Campus 3 acting up

Discussion in 'Stove Forum' started by hikerduane, Jan 27, 2018.

  1. hikerduane

    hikerduane Subscriber

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    Last time I used my Campus 3, my notes said it ran great. This time, it acted like the wick was bad, losing pressure, clogged jet. Plus I noticed with the cooler temperatures, it vaporized fuel better with the windshield on. Had a parts kit from the Fettlebox, so went ahead and installed the parts. No change. I was unable to unscrew the vaporizer so I could check the wick, but thought I would give the upper part a soak in vinegar. Stove started up like old after a double prime, went to get my camera and it had lost ground. Surging again, low flame. I let it run some and it finally got back to what it should be. Maybe carbon or crud in the burner.

    A few pics, the threaded section of the bell isn't too good and has a crack in the thin material. Not robust like other brands. The Campus 3 is much smaller than a 123.
    Duane

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  2. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner SotY Winner Subscriber

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    @hikerduane
    I reckon it’s most certainly the wick. However well treated in your hands Duane, these old stoves have history the present knowledgeable CCS member owner can’t account for because it’s been in someone else’s hands in years before. Bad fuel maybe, letting the tank run dry, resulting in burning of the wick can leave the wick in bad shape. Repeatedly removing the jet to extract the debris is a pain and could become a never-ending task if the wick is in poor condition. Simply using a pricker to clear the jet without removing it of course pushes the debris back inside the cavity, only to return to the jet sooner or later.

    Even if the wick’s marginally bad, as with your example (since it’s capable of firing up very well) residual carbon and debris from the past lies in wait ready to detach from the wick and head jet-wards. I’ve had that happen often when I’ve put off the job of removing a burner, usually because I’ve anticipated difficulty in breaking the bond of the threads. You might consider removing the jet every time there’s a blockage to steadily dispose, speck by speck, of the debris the wick’s shedding, but it could be a lot of firings before you get a clear run without a blockage occurring.

    I’d say that’s what’s going on. Personally I’d dive in and remove the burner, probably with the judicious application of localised heat from a fine, intense blowtorch at the base of the burner stem - jet removed, fuel tank rinsed out beforehand, fuel cap off. First though, I’d decide on how the tank is constructed - soft solder or brazed joints, including crucially that centre boss the burner screws into. I’ve mostly encountered brazed joints with self-pressurising stoves, so the techinique of applying heat to the stem to assist in cracking the thread joint bond is workable.

    John
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2018
  3. hikerduane

    hikerduane Subscriber

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    Thank you John for what I thought was going on also. So many different queues, hard to pin down one thing. I may try some heat around the base, this stove is so small, not like others. After fixing the nrv on my French stove a few days ago and getting my Coleman model 1 restored, I thought i had all my stoves working once again.
    Duane
     
  4. MrAlexxx

    MrAlexxx Subscriber

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    Smaller than a 123? That's cool!
     
  5. Trojandog

    Trojandog United Kingdom Subscriber

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    It took me ages to get my No3 to run sweetly. It seems to be very sensitive to how the wick is installed - how tightly it's wound, how tight it fits the pipe, how far up the pipe it goes. At least a dozen times I went through:

    Burner off, wick out, re-set wick, burner on, light, curse, let the stove cool down, start again.

    But once you hit that sweet spot, it's a joy to use.

    A job for a wet afternoon.
     
  6. MrAlexxx

    MrAlexxx Subscriber

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    We get plenty of wet afternoons here. Just need to find one of those stoves! :)
     
  7. Metropolitantrout

    Metropolitantrout Subscriber

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    @presscall
    @Trojandog

    Appreciated the sage advice. I've had a Radius stove act up the same way and I broke off a it's vaporizer b/c I did not realize it was brazed on. Once you break that brazed seal with heat and get it removed, is it necessary to braze it back on? Or are the threads on the vaporizer self tightening and not in need of brazing?

    Thanks! Jerry
     
  8. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner SotY Winner Subscriber

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    That’s right, Jerry, tapered threads (which can lock up over the years) but not actually brazed - there’s no need, they’re self-sealing.

    John
     
  9. Metropolitantrout

    Metropolitantrout Subscriber

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    Good!
    I was picturing Duane brazing and un-brazing his vaporizer each time he adjusted his wick. Thanks John. Nice stove Duane. Jerry
     
  10. hikerduane

    hikerduane Subscriber

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    Thank you, I've seen nicer, but only need one of these, at least it is complete with the pot handle. I'll start drying it out so I can replace the wick. Will fire up once more to see if it runs ok.
    Duane
     
  11. Metropolitantrout

    Metropolitantrout Subscriber

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    Nice enough to be a runner too.
     
  12. threedots New Zealand

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    Replacing the wick is a good idea but if the fuel is in anyway contaminated; don't use it or you are only going to have problems again.

    @Trojandog makes some good points with regards to how tight the wick fits and its positioning.
    Remember that once the wick gets wet with fuel that it swells and if tight to begin with, it will get tighter to the point that it can become restrictive to the fuel flow and cause the burner to chuff.

    I fit them as far it will go up the burner tube then withdraw it a millimeter or 2. That will ensure that the wick wire does not enter the hole at the end of the tube and possibly block the fuel flow so that it doesn't get enough fuel to begin with.
    John
     
  13. hikerduane

    hikerduane Subscriber

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    Thank you, that's about my procedure. Stove is drying now, will apply some heat tomorrow, avoiding unsoldering bits. The vinegar soak removed some deposits around the threads.
    Duane
     
  14. hikerduane

    hikerduane Subscriber

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    Tried taking the burner off last night after drying the fuel out. :) still had blue flames coming out every orifice. Unable to budge the vaporizer. Meanwhile, had to place the stove by my woodstove over night to dry water out of the fount as I tried once for a heat and quench. Then this morning while getting outerwear on to go outside, knocked the fount on the floor. Only bent one of the studs the windshield screws onto, dang it. Corrected that, squirted a little bit of meths down the vaporizer before installing the jet back to soak up any residual moisture. After priming, stove hesitated to burn, but after more priming alcohol in the depression, stove ran on its own. Nice, strong flame, evened out too, maybe some carbon in the jet finally cleared out. Slight yellow, then started surging and flaring up. My notes said I had sealed the jet threads before and it looked like there was a leak again causing the flare up it looked like, so took the jet out and added sealant. Will try firing up again, confident all will work fine.
    Duane
     
  15. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner SotY Winner Subscriber

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    Sounds like a result @hikerduane.
    Maybe so. Soaking the wick in water, drying it out, clearing up any residual moisture with alcohol before fuelling up and firing evidently had a beneficial effect. Hope the jet fix works.

    John
     
  16. hikerduane

    hikerduane Subscriber

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    Stove isn't consistent, ran it awhile after lunch, ok flame, pricked the jet a few times, ran strong. Guess carbon is still coming up. I flushed it some yesterday.
    Duane
     
  17. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner SotY Winner Subscriber

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    @hikerduane
    It’s a tough call with these small self-pressurising stoves sometimes, as with this Optimus 80 on which someone had attempted to remove the burner and the stem had snapped off, leaving a stubborn stub in the stove tank.

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    John
     
  18. hikerduane

    hikerduane Subscriber

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    @presscall, John, I can see the burner moved maybe a 1/4"/5mm? Fired up the stove this afternoon, ran good, maybe any moisture or carbon has worked out. Thank you for checking in and making sure I'm on the right track.
    Duame
     
  19. AngryDaddyBird Banned

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    Is there anyone who can tell me if there’s a place that can make the Campus 3 pot supports?
     
  20. Trojandog

    Trojandog United Kingdom Subscriber

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    @AngryDaddyBird I made some from galvanised wire but they sagged a little under the heat and I had to keep straightening them. I then made some from stainless steel rod I found on Ebay UK. I can't show you pics as the stove was a duplicate and I sold it, but it's just a simple L shape (unless you want the kink that the supplied pot sits in. I never used that pot so it never bothered me).