Coleman No. 527

Discussion in 'Military' started by SMolson, Apr 17, 2013.

  1. SMolson

    SMolson Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2009
    Messages:
    1,048
    A Coleman Military Burner Model No. 527. This is another stove that I inherited from Grandfather, 15 years ago. The story I heard was that he purchased this new in 1945, from Montreal QC, at a military surplus store. When I obtained it she showed little if any use, although the box had been opened.

    1366171986-IMG_2977_527_opt.jpg

    It came with a military-green canvas pouch (unopened) of spare parts, a folding aluminum pot stand, key/multitool on chain, a small metal cylinder holding 2 spare vaporizers wrapped in cardboard and a paper Handbook (user manual) all packed into a wax-covered box (wax for environmental/water protection).

    Canvas pouch with parts:
    1366172003-IMG_2978_Pouch_opt.jpg

    2 sets of tie strings on the backside of it:
    1366172008-IMG_2979_string_opt.jpg

    The cardboard packing box wrapped in cheese-cloth soaked wax (covering the box's labeling stickers)
    1366172020-IMG_2981_waxed_box_opt.jpg

    Cloth Seam:
    1366172026-IMG_2982_seam_opt.jpg

    Handbook (I'll post the book in the reference library). Number 12-43 printed on the front page, lower left perhaps indicative of the year (1943?)
    1366172037-IMG_2985_instructions_opt.jpg

    Model No. 527 parts list (part of Handbook):
    1366172044-IMG_2986_parts_opt.jpg

    Fuel tank with operating instructions, spindle/multitool on chain afixed to fold-out stove support. The cut-out in the tool is used to tighten/unscrew the fuel cap:
    1366172053-IMG_2983_coleman_instructions_opt.jpg

    Single small burner bell/burner plate (can be unscrewed to access jet):
    1366172062-IMG_2984_burner_opt.jpg

    Spare vaporizers/jet stored in cylinder under fuel tank, pump side. No rubber gasket on cap.
    1366172072-IMG_3011_spares_opt.jpg

    Burner bell, fuel control valve stem, tip cleaner lever (all fully operational). COLEMAN on molding.
    1366172089-IMG_2989_burner_opt.jpg

    Pump and fuel cap. Fuel cap with no rubber washer, just metal threads. Pump uses leather pump cup, different NRV system, standard Primus/Optimus style NRV removal tools will not work on this. No leaks in the pump chamber so had no need to access the valve.
    1366172190-IMG_2991_Pump_opt.jpg

    Stove and pot support in folded position.
    1366172102-IMG_2988_side_view_opt.jpg

    Pat No on opposite side of COLEMAN.
    1366172112-IMG_3014_opt.jpg

    Stove primed (with spirit) and running (coleman fuel). I didn't bother cooking up anything on it, not the most convenient stove for food prep.
    1366172122-IMG_3026_lit_opt.jpg

    Flame shot patterns at night:
    1366172130-IMG_0470_flame_opt.jpg

    1/16th of a second.
    1366172136-IMG_0462_flame_pattern_opt.jpg

    She has a nice purr when running, not overly loud like a Svea 123. Not the most practical stove for field-use: flimsy pot supports, no heat shield for tank, no safely pressure release, fuel control valve very low to the ground (need lots of clearance) making it a challenge to operate in all but flat surfaces, pump chamber overly large taking up lots of space in fuel tank, risk of metal seizing up (no gaskets), pump tube directly below fuel cap making filling without back-spilling a challenge, nice fireball occurs at every lighting (after priming), small priming well (fill the burner bell up to the first set of holes with spirit), no wind shield, etc. But she functioned well enough, put out lots of heat and i'm sure served her military duty well considering how many of these are around.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2015
  2. kerry460

    kerry460 Australia Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2010
    Messages:
    2,357
    G,,day . interesting stove, even if you dont use it ,nice to own, and it was your grandfathers which makes it special.
    cheers
    kerry
     
  3. itchy

    Offline
    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2009
    Messages:
    3,037
    Always been curious about these stoves. I don't think I have ever before seen pictures of one in that fine of condition, and with all the bits and pieces.
     
  4. snwcmpr

    snwcmpr Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2011
    Messages:
    12,462
    Location:
    North Carolina
    Very nice post. I have been wanting one of those. I had thought that for cooking, one would have to make a frame to stand a pot on.
    Thanks, Ken
     
  5. ulysses

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2008
    Messages:
    1,263
    A very nice stove, in the best condition I've ever seen one. Acquired in 1945, in the box, it probably is NOS. I've seen them with a stainless steel container / tray for sterilizing medical instruments, about the size of the cardboard box. There is a small rack that goes in the stainless container that allows the instruments to be plucked out of the boiling water, with a hook-like device.

    It would probably be used on a field table, where the awkward access to the fuel valve would not be as much as a problem. It would have been used in a field aid station, or perhaps a dental office. The two burner Coleman military stove (523?) was used in larger field hospitals to sterilize medical instruments.

    Paul
     
  6. Rick b

    Offline
    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2008
    Messages:
    1,612
    Location:
    Boise
    Wow. That is the nicest one I've ever seen. Most are missing the pot support..Thanks for posting.
     
  7. kablamachunk

    Offline
    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2009
    Messages:
    208
    i have one ugly one with coke can flame spreader with the sterilizing rack and pan but no stand(been looking for one(i use it to make pitch for model canoes))...i like that u do not have to prime them to start...yours is a beautiful stove and agree not seen one in better shape...great fotos !
     
  8. SMolson

    SMolson Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2009
    Messages:
    1,048
    Hi, thanks for all the additional info. I don't know whether he had purchased the pan/container with the insert or whether it was even available. If he did buy those other items, it was likely thrown out or recycled by those looking after his estate (I never saw it). He was not a stove collector, but instead liked looking for deals and acquiring/inheriting 'unusual' items, which this one I'm assuming met. He acquired many items during his lifetime and has a museum of sorts on one of his properties displaying some of them.
    The 527 met a specialty need and was constructed/designed as such so she's not anywhere close to a camping stove. But I appreciate her military history and what benefit she brought to the people working with them and their patients.
     
  9. idahostoveguy

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2009
    Messages:
    3,369
    That is a great heirloom. You had a awesome Grandfather. I only inherited the overweight genes and male pattern balding from both my grandfathers!

    Thanks for sharing probably the most complete and excellent version of this stove.

    sam
     
  10. SMolson

    SMolson Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2009
    Messages:
    1,048
    LOL idaho!
     
  11. SMolson

    SMolson Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2009
    Messages:
    1,048
    Adding some pictures of the pump rod/assembly. The pump plunger/rod is hollow to enable the air stem to fit inside.

    1366312080-IMG_3047_pump_opt.jpg

    Air stem sticking out.

    1366312089-IMG_3048_pump_opt.jpg

    Pump bolt.
    1366312095-IMG_3051_pump_opt.jpg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2015
  12. weasel

    Offline
    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2010
    Messages:
    307
    If that cv/nrv ever needs to come out, I have the tool for that. I would consider doing that if you use the stove anymore. It should have an nrv style pip in there.
     
  13. SMolson

    SMolson Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2009
    Messages:
    1,048
    Thanks weasel, much appreciated. I have a few other Coleman models (including a lamp I believe) with that same air stem and hollow pump rod. Can you post a picture of that tool? I may keep my eyes out for one as I will most likely require a compatible tool in the future. According to the stove break-down picture above, it appears to use a 'check ball', which I'm assuming is similar to that in the valves of fuel caps in certain old (
     
  14. SMolson

    SMolson Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2009
    Messages:
    1,048
    Her 11 page Handbook posted to Reference Library.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 1, 2015
  15. weasel

    Offline
    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2010
    Messages:
    307
    I got mine from OCP. Works great.

    P7310012.JPG