1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Coleman No 530 Pocket GI - Triple Duty

Discussion in 'Coleman No:530 'GI'' started by idahostoveguy, Sep 26, 2013.

  1. idahostoveguy

    idahostoveguy Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2009
    Messages:
    3,355
    Location:
    Potato Country USA
    These Coleman 530 GI stoves have been waiting in the fettle queue for quite some time, maybe years? I managed to get them all done in one day. They all had the same problems:

    1. Dry or dead pump cup leathers.
    2. Gummed up check valves.
    3. Fuel/Air tubes gummed up or wrong length.
    4. Generators all gummed up.
    5. Fuel filler cap gasket as old as dirt.

    Here's the interesting thing. Two of them had F/A tubes that were too long and were hitting the bottom of the stove. I managed to pull them out from the tank, perform surgery on the tube to shorten them. I believe they were F/A tubes from some lanterns because they were just too long. I didn't take any pictures of that, but I was able to pull the bottom off the F/A tube, cut the tube with a hacksaw about 1/4 inch or about 7mm, shorten the needle by as much, and then solder all the parts back together. They work now.

    Stoves are dated A46, B46, and A47.

    Here they are:


    1380172982-Coleman530_triple_duty_015_lowres.jpg

    1380173041-Coleman530_triple_duty_001_lowres.jpg

    1380173055-Coleman530_triple_duty_002_lowres.jpg

    1380173065-Coleman530_triple_duty_003_lowres.jpg

    1380173075-Coleman530_triple_duty_004_lowres.jpg

    1380173082-Coleman530_triple_duty_005_lowres.jpg

    1380173091-Coleman530_triple_duty_006_lowres.jpg

    1380173099-Coleman530_triple_duty_007_lowres.jpg

    1380173109-Coleman530_triple_duty_008_lowres.jpg

    1380173119-Coleman530_triple_duty_009_lowres.jpg

    1380173133-Coleman530_triple_duty_010_lowres.jpg

    1380173148-Coleman530_triple_duty_011_lowres.jpg

    1380173155-Coleman530_triple_duty_012_lowres.jpg

    1380173165-Coleman530_triple_duty_013_lowres.jpg

    1380173177-Coleman530_triple_duty_014_lowres.jpg



    And one more...




    1380173335-Coleman530_triple_duty_150a.gif


    sam
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2015
  2. Sparky

    Sparky United States Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2010
    Messages:
    4,609
    Location:
    Cypress, Texas
    Very nice! I have one of these with all the bits but don't run it much. Too much excitement starting it up!
     
  3. anlrolfe

    anlrolfe Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2009
    Messages:
    1,937
    Location:
    Kentucky
    Are you saying that these should have been issued to the "Signal Corps"?

    Ain't nothing that the eyebrows can't handle.

    (3) well preserved and distinguished "Veterans"

    AR
     
  4. Sparky

    Sparky United States Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2010
    Messages:
    4,609
    Location:
    Cypress, Texas
    I have seen movies made during WWII where they were using these stoves to throw flames into enemy held positions. They had them mounted on tanks. :p
     
  5. snwcmpr United States

    Offline
    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2011
    Messages:
    7,577
    Location:
    USA
    Very nice. I only have 2.
    I saw 3 of these in 2 weeks a few years ago, have 2 of them, and haven't seen one since.
    The 47 B supposedly didn't have the funnel, I read that they ran out.
    Thanks, may have to dig it out of the box and fire it up.

    Ken in NC
     
  6. itchy United States

    Offline
    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2009
    Messages:
    2,857
    Location:
    Durham, North Carolina
    Very nice work. I really like the look of these guys.

    I have one and have to agree the start up can disturb the neighbors (and I live on 4.5 acres). A few folks describe how they installed a primer cup and that seems like a good idea if one planned to use it on a regular basis.
     
  7. Murph

    Murph United States Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    May 14, 2010
    Messages:
    1,745
    I wouldn't have thought they would run out of funnels, since they were still making these stoves in Canada up until 1951.

    Murph
     
  8. Rick b

    Rick b United States Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2008
    Messages:
    1,612
    Location:
    Boise, Id
    Nice triplets Sam. Glad you were able to sort out the fa tubes. Nice flames shots too!
     
  9. DAVE GIBSON United States

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2004
    Messages:
    4,081
    Location:
    Minneapolis Minnestota USA
    i got one of these years ago at a hospital rummage sale.all the hand work in putting one together must have been quite a job,just the cotter pins on the pot rest kept someone busy.
    here's a question,a sort of chicken and egg one.
    the pot/case looks like it was made to heat C ration cans.the big one for the meat and the top one for making coffee.was it planned like that?
    the stove is a mis-mash of stove styles.Coleman tank and Primus burner that makes a sort of unstable pile when it's working.i always wondered if it was made tall so the case/pots were the right size to heat cans or it just worked out that way in the end.
     
  10. idahostoveguy

    idahostoveguy Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2009
    Messages:
    3,355
    Location:
    Potato Country USA
    Since this was strictly a civilian stove, I'm not sure C-rations was a rational for its design. The M-1941 or Coleman 520 was similar and was made for the military, but had a different cook set where the first were just the bottom and then later the two-part cookset. The biggest difference was that the stove had feet, some with three feet and later designs with four and back to three that folded out from under the fuel tank to give the stove some stability due to its height. I'm of the opinion that the 530 left the feet feature out for a number of reasons.

    IMHO, Putting the feet on was probably expensive, since the government wasn't buying any of these, they cut costs somewhere. Probably did not worry too much for civilians to find a level piece of ground to set the stove on since they were not under constant pressure of the enemy. They are heavy enough to be somewhat stable, with a full tank of fuel, it would be bottom heavy. They also didn't think it was too big a deal since Coleman was creating lanterns with even smaller footprints without any feet. I have, yet another one of these that is a good user stove and have not had any trouble brewing anything up or doing some cooking on it, on a table or on the ground. There's always a way to find level ground or make it leve. Also, the company and the USA had just been involved in the largest conflict in world history so, probably, getting one of these was both practical and patriotic. Some of the advertising sort of shows that. IMHO.

    In later years there were other stoves without feet like the Coleman 576, 505, and 440, just to name a few. They were a lot shorter and had a tank with a lot smaller diameter, so the company must have felt the design was safe enough for production.

    I've done a little cooking in the cookset, but I find the tall pot not as ergonomic as a short wider one. It is really designed well for boiling water, which it does quite well. Average boil time is a little under 6 minutes. The taller pot, must be more efficient for boiling than a short wider one.

    The rigid pot handle allows the pot to be held on the burner when the stove is slightly off kilter. You could probably get away with cooking breakfast in the shorter pan, like eggs, bacon and the like, but that is pushing it. I think the short pot is best suited to eating dinner out of it. Again, my humblest opinion here.

    As for priming, I never do that with these or the 520s, M-1942s, or M-1950s I have. I just pump the stove up, open the valve, light it, watch the 18-inch flame blast out the top, and then wait until the flame turns blue. I then open 'er up! It's very exciting to watch and do!


    sam