1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Coleman No:530

Discussion in 'Coleman No:530 'GI'' started by Archivist5, Jul 16, 2008.

  1. Matukat United States

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2008
    Messages:
    4,626
    Location:
    Pueblo West, Colorado
    :lol: :lol: The wood would be hard to get into the tank!!!
    I have an m1950? made by Rogers in 1964, Vietnam era, but same can as yours! (Thanks to Lance, the knight of the highways!)
     
  2. kellyblues

    Offline
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2009
    Messages:
    27
    Can someone explain how to post a picture to a topic after I have it uploaded?

    Kelly
     
  3. Spiritburner

    Spiritburner United Kingdom Admin Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2004
    Messages:
    9,615
    Location:
    N.E. England
    Hi Kelly,
    Here the link to the tutorial on adding pics to your post.
    https://classiccampstoves.com/threads//

    I know I'M missing it - not sure about everyone else but then I'm a Brit so we don't have that much exposure to these.

    I think I've understood what you wrote & have even seen some of the apparent contradictions you hint at on the web - but that takes me back to my first question - whats the difference between a 520 & a M1941 assuming the label on this linked picture is correct;
    http://wing.chez-alice.fr/USA/messgear/Stove_M1941.jpg

    You latest post raises a couple of questions - When you say the m1941 had a kerosene option are you taking about the M1941 shown at the above link or the tent heater - which I do know had a oil burning option.

    Was the M1942 you tried to post earlier not the Mountain stove?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2015
  4. flivver

    flivver United States Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2008
    Messages:
    1,230
    Location:
    Arizona
    Hi all: MY heartfelt thanks to all the CCS-ers that
    contributed to this post. I haven't laughed this hard in years. Hopefully someone out there has learned something. What that is I am not sure. Thanks again Mike...
     
  5. Spiritburner

    Spiritburner United Kingdom Admin Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2004
    Messages:
    9,615
    Location:
    N.E. England
    I know I must get around to fettling my 530 & the green 520 (that may or may not be a M1941) especially as I have the spares. I fettled the M1942 (stove, one burner) a couple of years back & am really impressed with it. Design-wise it seems way ahead of it's time.
    I may split this thread away from the original gallery entry but leave it in the same forum - useful info for the future especially when we have everything clarified.

    I know I'd like one of those nice nickled 1941 520's shown on Terry's site. ;)
     
  6. flivver

    flivver United States Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2008
    Messages:
    1,230
    Location:
    Arizona
    Hi Ross: I must apologize, I was so entertained by the posts I held back to see what would happen. To answer your question . Yes the 520 is "a" M1941, but not "the" M1941. Simply put the U.S. military labeled all contract mill spec. purchase items of 1941 "M1941". That"s why the wood burning tent stove and the Coleman 520 and countless other items are labeled M1941 etc. So yes there is most certainly an "M". Mike...
     
  7. Matukat United States

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2008
    Messages:
    4,626
    Location:
    Pueblo West, Colorado
    No new information, just another great page about the "portable stove of the future!" (add echo) from Coleman.

    http://www.kshs.org/cool2/colemanstove.htm

    Do listen to the podcast!

    Here we go again- From a profile of the Coleman company-

    http://www.fundinguniverse.com/company-histories/The-Coleman-Company-Inc-Company-History.html

    "When World War II began, Coleman was called upon to manufacture products for the various branches of the U.S. armed services, including 20-millimeter shells for the Army, projectiles for the Navy, and parts for the B-29 and B-17 bombers for the Air Force. In June 1942 the company was notified by the Army Quartermaster Corps with an urgent request--field troops needed a compact stove that could operate at 125 degrees above and 60 degrees below zero, was no larger than a quart bottle of milk, and could burn any kind of fuel. Moreover, the Army wanted 5,000 of the stoves delivered in two months.

    Coleman worked nonstop to design and manufacture a stove to the Army's specifications. The end product was better than the Army had requested: the stove could work at 60 degrees below and 150 degrees above Fahrenheit; it could burn all kinds of fuel; it weighed a mere three and one-half pounds; and it was smaller than a quart bottle of milk. The first order for 5,000 units was flown to U.S. forces involved in the November 1942 invasion of North Africa. Ernie Pyle, the famous World War II journalist who wrote about the common man's experience in the war, devoted 15 articles to the Coleman pocket stove and considered it one of the two most important pieces of noncombat equipment in the war effort, the other being the Jeep."

    Herb Ebendorf is one of the co-authors of The Coleman Collectors Guide. Mr. Ebendorf is now 98 years old and still shows up at the Witchita Outlet Store and Coleman Museum every now and then. I actually have a message on his desk with the question about the 520. When and if he comes in, ( he no longer drives ) and when and if he fancies calling a stove nut to answer a question... I'll let you know what he says!
    He used to come in every Tuesday and Thursday until he stopped driving last year, according to John at the Outlet store. Worked part-time steady till the age of 97 and now he's "semi-retired" O:)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 1, 2015
  8. Spiritburner

    Spiritburner United Kingdom Admin Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2004
    Messages:
    9,615
    Location:
    N.E. England
    Dude - I already quoted Funding Universe! Kelly has already been in contact with Herb who conforms the 1941 info here.

    For me that's not the issue.

    Firstly it is correct to refer to the 530 as a GI stove despite it's civilian status.
    The same as a popular boys doll that never actually served.

    That the Coleman 520 & the others made by other manufacturers is a M1941 as per your link showing the boxed stove with label.

    But mainly how many were made for the military. I may be reading Kelly's post wrong but from my UK viewpoint civil service/defense does not mean front line use. I take that as civilian government use & home front. So that leaves a 1000 in 1941 plus 'some'.

    & a supplementary - which is the Mountain Stove M1941 (520) or M1942 (burner, one)?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 1, 2015
  9. flivver

    flivver United States Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2008
    Messages:
    1,230
    Location:
    Arizona
    Hi all: Am researching U.S. mil spec. purchase orders, will get back to you all. Mike...
     
  10. Spiritburner

    Spiritburner United Kingdom Admin Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2004
    Messages:
    9,615
    Location:
    N.E. England
    Sounds good! Thanks for clarifying the M-date issue. I thought that was the case, then had doubts & am now back to square one! & thanks for kicking off another fascinating thread!
     
  11. Matukat United States

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2008
    Messages:
    4,626
    Location:
    Pueblo West, Colorado
    Dude? DUDE? :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: ! It's got to be a generational thing... my oldest uses "dude"...
    I am embarrassed! I went in a circle because I didn't read early in the thread.
    Kelly already did the leg work going back to the source- Herb Ebendorf at Coleman! :oops: :oops: :oops: :oops: Doh! I read the bit about talking with generals....and wasn't convinced! :doh: :doh:
    Now Mr. Ebendorf has a note on his desk to answer a redundant question.... :oops:
    All the best,
    Randy

    Edit-Sorry for my confusion Kelly!
     
  12. flivver

    flivver United States Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2008
    Messages:
    1,230
    Location:
    Arizona
    Hi all: I wish to give a public thank you to Mr.Ebendorf. I am sure many many others besides myself have benefited from Herb's generosity, giving of his time and research to folks like us. Over the last 25 years I have spent hours on the phone with Herb and received reems of Zeroxed, (copied)Coleman paper work from him to aid my research back when it had to be done the hard way before computers and the internet. To you Herb my heartfelt thanks. Mike...
     
  13. Spiritburner

    Spiritburner United Kingdom Admin Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2004
    Messages:
    9,615
    Location:
    N.E. England

    Got to be hip to attract the 'younger crowd'! ;)

    I'm a fan of the 'Big Lebowski' so do like to let slip the odd 'dude'.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2015
  14. Littledre United Kingdom

    Offline
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2009
    Messages:
    535
    Fascinating stuff. It would be nice to see some pictures of the 520's M1941/42/43/44/45 ???
    made by different manufactures and accompanied with a reference.
     
  15. Matukat United States

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2008
    Messages:
    4,626
    Location:
    Pueblo West, Colorado
    Hi All,
    I had also sent a missive to Jim Nichols, the president of the Coleman Collector's Club. Today, he e-mailed a copy of the Colemn Lite Newsletter by Herb Ebendorf, from 1988. The article verifies everything that Kelly has told us and gives more detail. It's a PDF document and is too big for upload but here is the pertinent text with a huge thanks to Jim Nichols!

    _____

    Months prior to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the War Department was giving thought to creating a detachment of soldiers equipped to fight in the high mountains and sub· zero temperatures. The Army commissioned the National Ski Association to assist in the development of equipment for the ski troops. In March, 1941 the Association came to Coleman with a request for a very special stove. Specifications
    called for a one-man stove, small in size, light in weight, strong enough to stand abuse, and simple and easy to operate.
    All parts were to be attached to prevent loss. The stove must operate successfully in weather 125 degrees above and 60 degrees below zero and that would burn any gas rated at 52 to 100 octane.
    Coleman engineers were dubious that such a stove could be developed, but agreed to try. Development of what would become known as the G.1.Pocket Stove began on April 1, 1941. On May 20 the first working model was finished.
    Without waiting for extensive testing, Coleman was instructed by the War Department to proceed without delay.
    First delivery of 1,204 stoves went to the Army Quartermaster Corp. Almost immediately QMC ordered 5,000 stoves to be rushed by "fastest express" to New York
    City. From New York City, the stoves traveled to the Mediterranean in time to go with the American forces in the invasion of North Africa.


    Thanks again to Mr. Jim Nichols and, although he has yet to ( and might not ) call, to Mr. Herb Ebendorf, the author of the above excerpt.

    Kelly- You have it correct over all the other sources on the web. Sorry again for second guessing you! If you would like the PDF of that document, let me know and I can e-mail it. Couldn't figure out how to post it. It has more in that article and a couple of pics, other articles.

    Best,
    Randy
     
  16. Littledre United Kingdom

    Offline
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2009
    Messages:
    535
    Randy, I would be interested in that pdf file. Please.
    Den
     
  17. Matukat United States

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2008
    Messages:
    4,626
    Location:
    Pueblo West, Colorado
    Send your e-mail to me in a PT and I'll forward it on to you.

    I was just reading the rest of the document.
    It states that the one millionth stove was presented to General Ike Eisenhower!
    edit-
    Ok, I see that your e-mail addy is in your profile. Getting on it now. :-)

    edit no.2 - Done!