Coleman No. 9D Broken Burner

Discussion in 'Fettling Forum' started by idahostoveguy, May 4, 2012.

  1. idahostoveguy

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    This was damaged in shipment. Any thoughts? Go or no go? Hate to see this 9D go the way of the parts bin, but it will probably end up that way. It will never look the same.



    1336151591-brokenburner-01.jpg

    1336151596-brokenburner-02.jpg

    1336151601-brokenburner-03.jpg


    sam
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2015
  2. RonPH

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    No idea on how to repair cast metal so I could not make any suggestions.

    Hope though that there is a solution or remedy other than a donor part.

    Ron
     
  3. orsoorso

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    which kind of metal is the broken casting? if it's cast iron and there are all the pieces it can be welded using a bronze alloy. a good exaust pipe repair workshop could do the job, and the results is like new" but it is costly.

    Orsoorso
     
  4. Sparky

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    Yes, brazing or Nickel rod arc welding but in addition to the cost, the repair will stick out like puke on a prom dress.
     
  5. itchy

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    Ah crap. I hope you can fix it.
     
  6. Big BTU

    Big BTU Subscriber

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    It can be fixed. Talk to a couple mechanics etc. Like it has been pointed out, you will see the repair but so what, adds character and another chapter to the stoves history.
     
  7. hikerduane

    hikerduane Subscriber

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    That's a bummer Sam.
    Duane
     
  8. weasel

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    Braze it and then spray it with VHT cast iron paint. Should look pretty good after that.
     
  9. idahostoveguy

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    I've heard of the bronze alloy fix on cast iron. Is that arc or mig welding? I have an acquaintance that does all kinds of welding and has all kinds of equipment.

    I'll look into it further.

    sam
     
  10. weasel

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    Done with torches.
     
  11. idahostoveguy

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    Ok, did a little searching on that. Looks like you need some really hot torches, like oxy-acetylene to get the cast iron hot enough, apply the braze, and then cool it down really slowly.

    Looks like I have a job for a neighbor of mine who as one of them ovens to cool stuff down with.


    sam
     
  12. orsoorso

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    Yes, oxiacetilene is the way, and for VERY slow cooling, put the still hot brazed piece in a hoven, 250 centigrade, (kitchen hoven at max shold be ok) and lower the temp after une hour to 150. after one more hour shut off. Best treatment before spaying HT paint would be sandblasting. but a bath of phosphoric acid coud do.
    NO electrolitic bath on a brazed cast iron-bronze piece.

    Orsoorso
    Orsoorso
     
  13. idahostoveguy

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    Thanks for the info. I'm excited to get this oldie back in service even with the war wound it received.

    sam
     
  14. idahostoveguy

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    Ok, so I put it back together...



    Raw. Right after solidification and a little grinding:
    1339131853-burner_012fixed.jpg



    Painted with cast iron VHT 2000F paint:
    1339131861-burner_013fixed.jpg



    Another angle:
    1339131868-burner_014fixed.jpg


    I'll put the stove all back together later.


    sam
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2015
  15. RonPH

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    Hey Sam, nice job :thumbup: did you do it by yourself? Hope to see the stove up'n running.

    Ron
     
  16. hikerduane

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    :) :) Hey, hey, looks great, hope it takes the heat Sam.
    Duane
     
  17. Rick b

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    Wow Sam, nice job, looks brand new.
     
  18. idahostoveguy

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    Yep, did it meself. I didn't want to pay 80 bucks for a welder to do it. Hope it works too.

    Melting point of grey cast iron is around 2150 to 2360F, depending on the cast iron, which I got pretty close to on most of the burner and then melted through part of it. Had to build it back up. Didn't realize I had the heat up so high. Now I know!!!

    I had to do some grinding to get the burner bowl level enough for the burner cap to fit properly. It stuck up in the air a bit. Now it fits (not shown).

    The real test will be the blue flames, if I can get one.


    sam
     
  19. idahostoveguy

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    I finally got around to finish baking the Coleman 9D burner. I only had a chance to get the first bake in. I did it all on my Coleman 426B with homemade file cabinet oven. It's nice and roomy inside of it and can stand the heat.

    You can barely see it in the picture but the needle is about to hit 550F and on its way to 600F. I had to put a shield above the tank to protect the fuel tank from the heat while it was at work baking my burner, since it was getting quite hot. The shield worked, by the way, and made it so that I could touch the tank with bare fingers. Whew!

    Here's the process for VHT cast iron paint as found on the can:

    1. Bake at 250F for 30 minutes.
    2. Let cool for 30 minutes.
    3. Bake at 400F for 30 minutes.
    4. Let cool for 30 minutes.
    5. Back at 600F for 30 minutes.
    6. Let cool.

    I didn't follow the instructions exactly since it is very difficult to get the heat to exact temperatures with these home made ovens or even the manufactured ones. The first run, I baked at 300 to 350F for about 1 hour and 20 minutes. I let cool for a few days. The second bake session I baked at 450F for well over an hour and let it cool for a couple of hours. On the final bake, I got the temperature to almost 600F and let it go for about 20 minutes and then lowered the temp by 25F every 10 minutes. At 600F, the paint cooked and smoke or vapor developed from the parts since I did the burner and the burner plates. I think this is where final crystallization occurs and creates the tough finish.


    1339906056-coleman9Dburner_001a.jpg


    Here's the burner a few hours after it cooled off. It was still very warm to the touch about 2 hours after I did the final shutdown of the oven, which I took about an 3 hours to let cool down. Didn't want to jeopardize the integrity of the cast iron by letting it cool too quickly.

    1339906066-afixedcoleman9Dburner_005.jpg

    Another shot of the burner showing the baked on VHT paint. Looks like it is going to stay. This would be the backside of the burner.

    1339906070-afixedcoleman9Dburner_006.jpg

    Here's the side where you can see the hot-blast chamber and the generator inlet hole next to it. The burner looks to be in fairly good condition. I put the burner plates on without the screws to show them off since I painted those with the VHT paint as well. They came out extra nice.

    1339906076-afixedcoleman9Dburner_007.jpg

    In the next three photos, I show the burner with the generator bracket on. It attaches to the burner itself with a small rod that is held in place using a cotter pin. It took me a while to remember how that piece fit on the stove and then I had to remember how it fit on the burner. First your hair, your hearing, your sight, and then your mind. Maybe not in the exact order but you know what I mean. Now what was I talking about?


    1339906080-afixedcoleman9Dburner_008.jpg

    1339906084-afixedcoleman9Dburner_009.jpg

    1339906092-afixedcoleman9Dburner_011.jpg

    The next four photos show the auxiliary burner control knob, which is a hard coil spring and knob. This is inserted into the burner and is controlled by plugging the hole within the burner.

    1339906088-afixedcoleman9Dburner_010.jpg

    1339906097-afixedcoleman9Dburner_012.jpg

    1339906101-afixedcoleman9Dburner_013.jpg

    1339906106-afixedcoleman9Dburner_014.jpg

    Here's everything assembled back to what a 9D should look like (at least the burner anyway), the case is in sad shape with multiple layers of black paint and some rust. We'll tackle that later.


    1339906111-afixedcoleman9Dburner_016.jpg

    Flames photos next...


    sam
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2015
  20. idahostoveguy

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    Ok, so will it survive the flames. After all that work, I sure hope so. It has taken about 20 hours in total time to get the burner back welded back together just right. Hmmmm. I guess I never told you how I did it. Well. I didn't braze it back together. I didn't have the resources for that. So, what did I do? I MIG welded it back together. Under the advice and watchful eye of a welder and adjusting the power levels to just the right amount, I was able to use a flux-core wire welder to put the pieces back together. I had to first, heat all of the parts so that the cast iron would not buckle under the shock of the high heat from the welder so I blasted them all with a MAPP torch until all parts were HOT! I then proceeded to MIG weld it all back together. I had to weld for about 3 to 5 seconds and stop to not get things too hot. Blast it with a torch and then 3 to 5 seconds more. After about an hour, I got things completed. I made one booboo leaving a part of the weld undone near the rim. I took a chance and melted the rim right down - stupid. So I took a couple more hours building the rim back up and then spent a few hours grinding it back down to make it look original. What a pain in the backside that was. It's as close as it will get. I spent some more time grinding down other spots to make it look a little decent and this is what we've end up with.


    The first photo is the first hot-blast procedure. I actually fire the stove up twice. Once during the day and the other in the evening. I couldn't really see the flames so, I did a second session to show the flames. You can just barely make out the blue flame underneath the generator. It's blasting away quite loudly at this point.

    1339908026-afixedcoleman9Dburner_017.jpg

    1339908035-afixedcoleman9Dburner_019.jpg

    1339908040-afixedcoleman9Dburner_024.jpg

    1339908047-afixedcoleman9Dburner_025.jpg

    1339908053-afixedcoleman9Dburner_030.jpg


    Second fire up session. First, hot-blast to get the generator warmed up. I let a little bit of fuel fill the hot-blast cup underneath, let it burn for a bit, and then crank up the fuel and light the thing up. The flames reflect back to get that generator really hot.

    1339908059-afixedcoleman9Dburner_037.jpg


    Once the hot blast is complete, I turn the valve off, move the generator to the burner inlet hole, turn the valve back on, and light the burner. Blue flames right off the bat. I guess from here on out the flames are shown off on both burners. Near the end are the simmer flames, which get the burner really hot. You'll see the flame plate getting red hot.

    1339908063-afixedcoleman9Dburner_039.jpg

    1339908068-afixedcoleman9Dburner_040.jpg

    1339908072-afixedcoleman9Dburner_041.jpg

    1339908077-afixedcoleman9Dburner_044.jpg

    1339908083-afixedcoleman9Dburner_045.jpg

    1339908090-afixedcoleman9Dburner_046.jpg

    1339908098-afixedcoleman9Dburner_048.jpg

    1339908111-afixedcoleman9Dburner_050.jpg

    1339908117-afixedcoleman9Dburner_051.jpg

    1339908123-afixedcoleman9Dburner_055.jpg

    1339908130-afixedcoleman9Dburner_060.jpg

    1339908139-afixedcoleman9Dburner_061.jpg

    I took the next picture of the burner right after shutting things down. I wanted to see the condition of the burner but also how well the paint held. Looks to be holding with a few singes down in the burner bowl. I hope that weld keeps holding. Looks like it is. I let that flame burner close to 30 minutes on high and let simmer. We'll see how it holds up over the next few months as I use this stove on my next few car camps.

    1339908149-afixedcoleman9Dburner_062.jpg


    Cheers,
    sam
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2015