Coleman Peak 1 - which model is this?

Discussion in 'Fettling Forum' started by OutdoorStefan, Aug 18, 2020.

  1. BradB

    BradB United States Subscriber

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    The three on the valve are 005. The 009 goes on the bottom of the fuel pickup. The thin goes at the top of the fuel pickup. I use Viton for all, rather than the softer blue ones sometimes sold for Canadian stoves. I don’t experience -40 degrees anymore so I don’t need the soft ones.
     
  2. OutdoorStefan Germany

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    Hi Brad, super, thanks!

    B = Thin

    A = ?
    C = ?
    D = ?
     
  3. BradB

    BradB United States Subscriber

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    A is 009. C&D are 005. My oldest is 1995 and newest 2005. All have a double o ring where yours has one on the valve. This one still has the original blue soft o ring. A36DB3BF-005C-46BF-B1CA-02587DEE5CB7.jpeg
     
  4. OutdoorStefan Germany

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    Hi Brad, please see my picture. C and D have definitely different size. You said that C and D = 005. Could you kindly double check? o-ring-2020-08-28-a.jpg
     
  5. OutdoorStefan Germany

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    ...or maybe someone else know the sizes???
     
  6. BradB

    BradB United States Subscriber

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    Your stove is older than mine and I can see some changes they made. The sizes I listed worked for mine. Perhaps the first 550B stoves shared some similarities with older A and 550 models. I don’t know as I have none of those stoves. I suggest you buy a viton kit with multiple sizes and use what works.
     
  7. OutdoorStefan Germany

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    Hi Brad, a viton kit is a good idea. recently I bought (fo a different project) an NBR-o-ring-kit. But I guess NBR does not work with unleaded fuel?
     
  8. BradB

    BradB United States Subscriber

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    I personally do not use unleaded in any stove. In the 550B the generator is extremely difficult to clean the deposits from unleaded gas. For me it has been impossible. Replacement generators are becoming scarce and are not made any more. If you don’t want to burn white gas you can burn kerosene with a change of generators. My models required only the generator change, but early ones required a change of the fuel pickup as well. In any case, viton o rings will resist fuels better than anything readily available.
     
  9. OutdoorStefan Germany

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    Well.... I ride a Harley Road King Classic - and I always carry up to 22 l unleaded with me. So arriving on the camping ground I simply take some of my fuel and put it into the stove. It is soooo easy 8]

    I will try to buy some spare generators on stock.
     
  10. BradB

    BradB United States Subscriber

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    I know the MSR videos show how they scour out the fuel line with a cleaning wire. Perhaps if you were clever you could devise a way to do that with your generators. Maybe with regular cleaning they might last much longer. Also, before storing perhaps a good soak in acetone and a scouring might help. But that regulating wire in there is oh so thin! Sounds like a good plan for the Harley. These stoves are quite easy to use and maintain.
     
  11. OutdoorStefan Germany

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    After using a second time the carburetor cleaner I get a lot of particles by washing with wash-benzin out of my stove (please see the picture). Is that ok? Or damaged I something now? Is this the original coating inside the stove? Do I have a problem now? How to go ahead?

    IMG_8755.jpg
     
  12. Yun¹²⁴ Korea, Republic of

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    Hello, -the gasoline from the gas station is absolutely not the suitable option for the 550B. And I personally think it is no good even for the dualfuel stoves. The Car-Gasoline contains too much additional chemi which means really no good for our health and so on.
    - so the Kero would be the good option, 550B can be switched to be the Kero stove although it works not super best with Kero.

    - as your photo, it shows too much a kind of oxideresidues and I personally think that fount is already ended of its life. Especially you are using gasoline for yr 550B, The pressurized fount, it is extremely dangerous with that condition as yr photo. A little leakage means - heavy fire with it.
    Above are only my personal opinions.

    -re. oring material, NBR is not okay for that purpose. Viton dupont (or same material, not even with viton name) is the designated material from oems.


    Re. Oring sizes
    I dont remember but it isn't a big deal because you can try only from US standard 005 to 010 (maybe) then you should find both...
     
  13. OutdoorStefan Germany

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    What do you think the particles in the picture are

    a) kind of oxide-residues
    or
    b) parts of the original inside coating?
     
  14. BradB

    BradB United States Subscriber

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    I have cleaned quite a few Coleman tanks on stoves and lanterns but I have never gotten that much junk out of a fount. Not sure what to say.
     
  15. Yun¹²⁴ Korea, Republic of

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    I think no matter what it is. In fact it is too dangerous to use with that ruined residues.
    Safety first!!
     
  16. OutdoorStefan Germany

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    I do not understand which trouble these residues could generate. The only question is
    a) is it the old coating or oxide
    b) how to remove it

    The stove itself is fine I think... :thumbup:
     
  17. OMC

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    @OutdoorStefan,
    This has been detailed 11 day Q & A and heading for more details. One way or another, we do want to get you to point you are posting comments/pics from motorcycle camping adventures. Might i suggest subscribe to the site btw, just me.
    The convenience of burning same fuel vehicle & stove spawned in 1920s and still has merit, i myself don't fault the concept. 550 is excellent stove but gen is a PITA to clean, so that's an already noted problem with this plan.

    Yun's safety concern is valid, abort this repair or not decision, is not to be taken lightly.
    If you abort now, anyone would be hard pressed to say that is a mistake.
    Rust from inside of thin steel petrol tanks are more concern than many others.

    Confession time only with hindsight, i regret not advising you upfront: before going any further (knowing *RUG was left in tank 25 years ) evaluate the integrity of the tank.
    *That is a nightmare scenario and could well be fatal for even thicker steel tanks.

    You can hear never-ending advise not to use RUG (regular unleaded gasoline),
    yet there are places in the world that do so and manage (<-- PS below re that ).
    I too advise against using it but if ever RUG is in a tank consider the shelf life of RUG is days, not weeks. BEFORE putting stove away empty the tank, flush tank (and run again w/proper fuel).
    ---------------------------------------------------------
    Your debris pile could fit onto your fingertip so if that is all there is, it may be possible tank has life left in it? It is doubtful.

    I myself can't recall any 550_ tanks fail due to rust <-- corrections encouraged, please, thanks.
    Myself (& many members) have to limit online hobby time. If I get a chance I'll go through my nastier 550s, peak inside and see if rust has compromised any tanks here (i know i do have old ones that were big time stanky upon arrival).

    PS Choosing a reliable portable gasoline stove <-- is on topic, worth reading.
    However much of that focus shifted to PT2, which, appears to be far less heat output that 550B.

    If a camper is dead-set on using RUG, what field maintainable models would one consider? (with heat output more comparable to the 550)

    A few specific models are suggested (in that thread), others models could also be considered/added to that thread US army M1950 comes to mind (maybe MSR XGK2 w/simmer plate?).

    @gieorgijewski is among members more familiar with burning auto gasoline,
    in that thread he later specifies [gasoline] stove must be:
    " strong enough
    compactable
    1 day tank capacity
    simply "as could be"
    [good point, we SEE 550B not at all simple]
    working - on demand
    working - after few months - stored with fuel
    PT2 is... "


    i comment: storing any stove w/RUG in it, 1 week max. (me: "not after few months!"), it is a given veteran user gieorgi seems to be less concerned and exactly 3 months may turn out ok but who will remember to flush tank after stored 3 months?... it is best flush it asap. Stored it's a stovie nightmare lurking on that shelf. In a car trunk or hot shed RUG will have nasty goop separate-out in the bottom of tank/container before you know it.
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2020
  18. OutdoorStefan Germany

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  19. snwcmpr

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    So many stoves.
    So little time.
     
  20. BradB

    BradB United States Subscriber

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    It depends how you cook. If you mostly boil water for dehydrated meals then the MSR XGK is often cited as the king of stoves for burning anything you have at hand. However, even with a simmering plate many say they are poor for that. The Dragonfly simmers well and hopefully someone who burns RUG in one will chime in here. If you want a classic stove to do that I would not be afraid to use a Coleman 502 with RUG. Its stick straight generator can easily be cleaned with a rifle barrel cleaning brush, which I would do regularly if burning RUG. Maybe owners of the Primus Omnifuel will chime in about its RUG capabilities. I am mostly a Trangia fan myself: easy to use, easily available fuel, windproof, and nothing to break. Since I don’t use a stove in super cold conditions it does everything I want.