Coleman Range Model 7 or 8 - 1927/30.

Discussion in 'Other Models' started by Doc Mark, Nov 3, 2012.

  1. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark Subscriber

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    Greetings, All,

    Newbie Nate's great post about his Air-O-Matic stove has reminded me that I never posted a thread about my own old Coleman Range!

    Some of our Old Timers may remember when I found this old Coleman stove of mine. After church one Sunday, a few years ago, I decided to pack a lunch, a stove, and head North in the Jeep, into the foothills of the Sierra, for a nice Sunday drive. I ended up in a small town which had a very interesting antique store, and there, in their fenced side yard, I immediately saw an old Coleman range, rusting away under the So. California desert sun!

    To make a long story short, I met the owner of that old shop, and, seeing an old jukebox in her store, mentioned that I used to work on Rowe jukeboxes. She immediately asked if I would take a look at hers, which had not worked in many years. Against my better judgement, and not without a huge amount of trepidation, I actually fixed her old Seeburg jukebox, with very limited tools, parts, and lubrication oils!! I'm still amazed it came together so well, and thank the Lord for guiding me on that "fly by night adventure"! Even though I used to work on the Rowe machines, I had never even seen the insides of a Seeburg, which was a box of a different design.

    After cleaning up, I asked the owner how much she wanted for that range out in her side yard, and she asked me to take her to it, and to anything else I might find interesting out there. As I showed her the range, and an old Coleman lamp, she was making notes in a huge red ring-binder notebook. Afterwards, whilst waiting for a price, she pored over her notes, very officially, then told me to go open up my Jeep, and pack up the range and lamp, as we were square after I had fixed her jukebox!! :shock: :thumbup: 8) :D/ :D/ :D :D THAT was a very nice thing for her to do, and I'm still appreciative, even after all these years!

    So, here is the range I got that day, along with the old Coleman lamp, and a double Sterno stove that I had found somewhere else on that trip. I wasn't going to buy that Sterno stove, but the Old Gentleman who ran that other shop was kind enough to tell me about the place where I might find some nice stoves, and he was absolutely right! So, even though I had to pay $5 for it, I'm glad I bought that double Sterno stove to thank him for his kindness!

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    All the rust turned out to be superficial, which is good, but the fiber knobs are probably history. I have very nice round rod of lovely oak that might make a good replacement knob, if I can't save the originals, or source some replacements. I think that, once this stove is completely dismantled, the rust cleaned up, lines blown out, and the fuel tank repaired , which is rotted out in the center of it's bottom, I should be able to get this Old Coleman back to something resembling how it looked when being used! I'm really hoping it will work a treat!

    I also have a beautiful old Coleman hand pump, made to go with the Model 457(G) stove/heater that will also work like a champ on this Coleman Range.

    Thanks to Nate for "reminding" me that I had this old Coleman Model 7/8, and thanks for checking out my old range, Folks. Take care, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2015
  2. Admin

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    Doc

    No need to feel upstaged by Nate, that old rust bucket of yours would clean up nicely. ;)
     
  3. Doc Mark

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    Morning, Ian,

    Hey, I'm very pleased that Nate posted such a fine thread whilst still so new here at CCS. Just tugged my memory somewhat, and reminded me of the old Coleman, waiting patiently for me to get to it.

    Thanks for the kind words on this old stove. I, too, think it will clean up very nicely, once I get the "gumption" up to give it a whirl. When that day comes, I will post "after" photos here, as well as flame shots. Talk to you later, and thanks, again. God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc
     
  4. Rick b

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    Hi Doc. Wow what a great story and to get such a stove and lamp in a trade for a some of your time is excellent. My wife got me a lamp, as far as I can tell from your photo, the same as yours, no markings on it that I can see, maybe there is something on the generator. (It stil hs the old Q99 generator). I havent done any cleaning yet, one of these days though...
     
  5. islandpiper

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    Both are beautiful stoves. I hope to get that lucky one day and find a real "goodie" like that. I wonder how many millions of these went into landfills. Where I grew up in Wisconsin every old dairy farm had a "washout" or a "gully" on the land someplace that was being filled by the generations of farmers with all their old worn things. Now, of course, many of us are paying more for old Coleman lamps than the old farmers did for a used T-Model pick up truck.

    I love the trade and swap stories. Everyone leaves a trade with a smile. So often no one leaves a cash sale with a smile.

    piper
     
  6. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark Subscriber

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    Greetings, All,

    It's been a very long time since I last had any movement on restoring my old Coleman #7, but recently, happenstance brought forth a fuel tank that is going to be fit this stove like a glove!! You may recall that the original Coleman steel tank was rotted-out beyond help.

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    Sourcing a replacement tank has been a long, unproductive, and disappointing journey. BUT, with they help of a very kind fellow member of the Coleman Collectors Forum, Bob Moore, who tipped me off that a nice, brass tank was available on the bay of evil, I know have an almost perfect replacement for my old rotted fuel tank!! Here's what I won:

    IMG_2422.jpg


    This tank came with a nice pressure gauge, too. It looks good, but in need of work, as it does not seem to function as it should. I'll check into rehabbing it, and see how that turns out.

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    The tank cap, and stop valve, both function perfectly, and are easy to loosen and tighten.

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    And, as this brass version is just a frog's hair later than my #7, but still in the same date range, 1924-1925, it has a fuel shut-off valve at the bottom of the tank, which works perfectly, and which I like, quite a lot!

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    I've tested the tank, and it holds pressure very nicely, and seems to do exactly what it was designed to do, with the possible exception of the fuel gauge. More on that, later.

    So, the next stumbling block will be repairing/replacing the four original fiber knobs on the stove burner assembly! Here is the original photo I took, upon having found this old stove.

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    I fear the knobs are in worse condition, now, but will have to remove the stove from storage, and unwrap it, to see their condition, now. Does anyone know how to repair such things? Is it even possible? Failing that, I'll need to try and source 4 OEM replacement knobs, if such things can be found. Otherwise, I'll have to "make do", and come up with something that functions, but is not original to the stove. I'll do that, if I have to, but it would be far better to have four replacement knobs, so the stove can be returned to original condition, as close as is possible.

    What are your thoughts on such things, Fellow Stovies? A CCF member recommended that I use a needle, and syringe to impregnate each knob with Alaphatic Resin (Carpenters Wood Glue), then, using plywood bits as a vise, as such, one with a hole in it for the knob rod, slowly press the knobs together, and allow them to dry. Using a "release" of sorts, was also recommended, and that would be easy to accomplish. What to you think, Gentlemen and Ladies?

    Now that I have the fuel tank, I'm ready to move on with the full restoration of this neat old Coleman stove!! Lots of snow right now, though, but work can be done, one small bit at a time, to clean up and paint the burners, get the knobs repaired, or replaced, and dismantle the stove cabinet for rust removal, and repainting. I did consider having the panels dipped in a special finish to forestall any future rust. In any case, I think this old stove WILL burn blue, once again, and whilst I has actually beginning to lose hope for that happening, my motivation towards finishing this project has gotten a huge shot in the arm, in the finding of this lovely, brass fuel tank!! God is good!! I look forward to hearing from you, with your thoughts on the knob restoration/replacement. Thanks for any help, or suggestions, that you can offer. Take care, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc
     
  7. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark Subscriber

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    Greetings, All,

    @Randy Field gave me a shout today, with questions about my old #7. I'm happy to report that he, too, has now found one, and wants to refurbish it, and fettle it back to life! Very cool! So, for Randy, and anyone else who might run into this problem, here are a few shots of one of the major problems I am having in getting mine running.

    The rotten fuel tank contains the remains of the fuel line connection. This is rusted fast, and no amount of 50/50 mix, and elbow grease is going to get it apart! SO, here is my rotted-out tank, once again, and the problem area.

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    Even the end of the tank was rotting.

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    And the parts that will not be separated using ATF/Acetone mix (50/50).

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    Why am I saving the worthless fuel tank, you might ask? Good question! It's because I want the fuel tank cap that is also stuck!!


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    I need to locate my torch, so can apply heat, and see if that helps the 50/50 so it's job. Failing that, I am going to get some Naval Jelly, and see if that will work! Once this part of it is complete, I will then deal with the rotting fiber knobs on the burner regulators. Old stoves are like Old houses: there is always something that needs fixing!! More later.... Take care, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc
     
  8. Randy Field

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    Wowsers! Thats a rotten tank if I ever saw one. Glad you have a backup plan. It will be fun to do these restos together and compare notes. I have an inspection camera to take a look inside the tank and will then pressurize and bubble test it assuming its clean enough to do so.
     
  9. Doc Mark

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    Greetings, All,

    @Randy Field , asked me a question as to how I knew that this stove was a #7 Range, and not a Bungalow stove. First and foremost, I was helped by Joe Pagan, and Terry Marsh, and it was they who dated the stove for me, and told me that it was a Model #7. Plus, here is a 1924 Coleman catalog page which clearly shows this stove is a #7:

    1924 Coleman Catalog .jpg
    I hope this help, Randy. Talk soon, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc
     
  10. Randy Field

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    Yes Doc,

    Thanks for the advertisement. That takes out much of the mystery of your sourcing info on getting a model # for your stove.


    Certainly a fascinating history lesson unfolding here. So it looks to me like the Coleman Master Burner was at the heart of many great stoves as well as the bungalow burner #140. This seems pretty evident. Furthermore, the 74 is same except that is sports 4 burners versus 3 burners. The number 8 was further refined with the added splash on the back; although, the #7 has punched holes in the top for addition of a splasher/shelf, it was not included or offered as an option. #9 would be same stove but without the tank, so it could be incorporated into a home running a hollow wire system. If we look ahead in Coleman's timeline there are other models with three digit model #'s I believe. Those starting with a 7 seem built around the same Master Burner but with more features.
    Does this all sound correct? Seems logical to me at this point, but not everything from Coleman moves in a standard straight line.
    It also seems odd Coleman would have not only the model 9 references above, but also the model 9 folding stove. Oh boy, the plot thickens.

    Oh, and thanks again! Blessings back to you sir!