Dae Lim or Dae Rim?

Discussion in 'Stove Forum' started by Afterburner, Nov 4, 2018.

  1. Afterburner

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    Annby stoves and their part are have most often marked with text 'Dae Rim' which in Korean is 대림 That text that I found from this instruction: https://classiccampstoves.com/threads/annby-no-l747-from-daelim-gas-co.9063/

    Google translates 대림 to Dae Lim. Character 'ㄹ' can be interpreted to be 'l' or 'r'. I am not sure if there is some reason/rule for that? :doh:

    So 대림 can be 'Dae Rim' and/or 'Dae Lim'. Company seems to prefer for 'Dae Rim'. Maybe for some parts the translator has converted 대림 to 'Dae Lim' so that why some parts have a text 'Dae Lim' on them.

    I ended up to this from my VERY preliminary try to study Korean alphabets. So maybe above is not so correct information. Maybe some our Korean member could help us with this matter. [-o<
     
  2. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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  3. Afterburner

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    Maybe foreman had told to employee to make roarer heads and stamp them whit text 대림 Employee Romanized text to 'Dae Lim' not to 'Dae Rim'.
     
  4. Afterburner

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    One Dae Lim company seems to be a big construction & Petrochemical Company.: http://www.daelim.co.kr/eng/daelim/overview/Intro.do Maybe that company didn't made stoves.:-s

    Search brings few smaller Dae Rim companies from Korea so maybe one of them manufactured Annby stoves. :-k

    Truly now we need consultation from our Korean members to open up this matter more.
     
  5. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark Subscriber

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    Greetings, All,

    I wonder of our excellent member, @gunsoo, can help with that? What say you, Gunsoo!! Thanks for any help you can offer! Take care, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc
     
  6. Afterburner

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    We need to wait help from @gunsoo in this matter...

    Also it would be interesting to know if 'Dae Rim' / 'Dae Lim' and 'Annby' has some more meaning that just a name.

    Many Korean company names have some meaning and their original name comes from Hanja character which has some etymological meaning.

    Like car brand name "Hyundai" comes from Korean hanja word 現代 , which means "modernity" and Samsung comes from Korean hanja word Samsung () , which means "tri-star" or "three stars". The word "three" represents something "big, numerous and powerful".

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyundai
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samsung
     
  7. Yun¹²⁴ Korea, Republic of

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    Hello, everybody
    I think I can tell something what you're looking for Korean and Hangul as the grammar if you still have some curiosities about it, yet pls be informed I'm not an English speaker.
    Yun¹²⁴
     
  8. Jeopardy

    Jeopardy Subscriber

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    That sounds like it is a common idea in the Far East then. Mitsubishi translates from Japaneses as "three diamonds" and their logo is a three pointed star made up of diamonds.
    Strange that 3 implies big , numerous or powerful when the Oriental character for four is avoided as much as possible because of the similarity to the character for death.

    Regards
    John
     
  9. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    Then there's the 3 Crowns....
     
  10. Yun¹²⁴ Korea, Republic of

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    Dear Afterburner,
    In Korean and Hangul, technically we have very few difference for the pronunciation for R & L even in Korean character [ㄹ], However it's totally meaningless in today's Korean so nobody cares it.
    In short, [ㄹ] from [대림] would be written in English as R or L as the speakers want, but I personally think L is the closer than R.

    However in this case, she had wanted to be called as DaeRim instead, but it's meaningless to know the reason why.

    Korean was not originally from Roman characters like roman alphabets, so it's really not possible to be trans-formed with the exact same pronunciation.
    It's almost impossible to explain better due to my poor English but hope now all is clear..

    It's feel pity, now all the Brass-stove manufacturers have been collapsed so there is no brand new productions anymore in Korea.
     
  11. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    A very clear explanation. The limits of transliteration between alphabets.

    I think transliteration is the right word. It is difficult to exactly preserve phonetic values even between lettering systems that have a common Indo-European origin, such as the Latin, Greek, and Cyrillic alphabets.