Early Primus No. 1 in altered format

Discussion in 'Stove Forum' started by Roger Baker, Oct 26, 2020.

  1. Roger Baker

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    I've been going through my garage lately, sorting out the accumulated stoves I've never found time to do anything meaningful with and came across this early (to me at least) version of the number 1.

    Someone had got to it before me, and I have had it so long I can't remember where or when I got it.
    Plainly it has had a bit of a hard time, and been in enemy hands for some of that. The silent burner is perhaps a later modification along with the abominable legs. I've never done anything to this apart from light it a few times years ago, and would be most appreciative of some advice over its age based on the features rather than the add-ons which could have been changed also. There is what looks like a cross (rather than an X ) underneath which looks to be original. There is no script on either flank of the air release screw, nor is there anything inscribed on the side walls of the tank. Still runs rather sweetly, and I'm definitely going to keep this. Not your usual shelf queen I know but it does have the marks and history associated with being used by men, and I respect that in anything old even if it has been butchered somewhat !
    Hope the pic's will be helpful.
    Thank you all kindly in advance, Roger. IMG_8848.JPG IMG_8849.JPG IMG_8850.JPG IMG_8851.JPG IMG_8852.JPG IMG_8854.JPG IMG_8856.JPG IMG_8857.JPG IMG_8847.JPG
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 26, 2020
  2. OMC

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    Welcome Roger,
    Thanks for posting.
    re your "would be most appreciative of some advice over its age based on the features.."
    We see it's pre-1911 from bottom stamp.
    Along with "PATENT" it looks like it has the PRI*MUS trademark logo with stove within the name, which places it post 1898 iirc.

    I'll guesstimate c. 1909 but I am quite sure the year range can be narrowed closer and based on the features.
    ====================

    EDIT, i trust Ian @igh371 will catch this edit. This one is not just a "run of the mill 3 legger" lol.
    We all will like to see a close up of the pump asm.

    Ian "...with no 'Primus' on the pressure screw, probably towards the earlier end of that period."
    While myself, seeing tank lid with "AKT.BOL.B.A.HJ..STOCKHOLM" lead to my hunch it was later c. 1909.
    I defer to Ian.
    -----------------
    PS i suppose "original" would be better but creating an EARLY 2 pinter w/removeable legs puts it into one niche i like very much.
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2020
  3. igh371

    igh371 SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Interesting modification that removable legs adaption, must have been useful for transporting at some point in its history. The various tank markings and scripts on the filler cap and pump tube cap all point to somewhere in the 1898-1908 decade, but, with no 'Primus' on the pressure screw, probably towards the earlier end of that period.
    The 'add-ons' can often be changed over time, but between c.1897 and 1911, with no date codings, it is only small detail changes in some of the fittings that can put stoves into any sort of date order. In this case, however, luckily, all of the fittings are commensurate with the earlier end of the same 10 yr time slot, so they probably haven't been changed.
    It would be interesting to see the pump rod assembly too, although that may be more likely to have been changed for a more 'modern' version (meaning one from post-c.1908).
    My kind of stove,
    Ian:thumbup:
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2020
  4. Roger Baker

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    Thanks to all who have responded. I had a feeling it was early 20th Century, and to be honest I guess precision doesn't matter a lot, but it beats all my other stoves and lanterns for seniority if it falls into the date range suggested.
    I don't recall taking the pump rod out before now, and it is rather unusual and the business end does have some features I'm unfamiliar with. Hope the pic's tell the tale !
    The legs are made from copper tubing, and somewhat clumsily soldered in place. The tripod has 2 perhaps shortened full length legs that look original-ish in profile, but the the third is rather crudely fashioned from some steel rod. I am a fan of collapsible models and this makes for an interesting adaptation for sure. I've seen a lot in the reference section with various bits of tripod soldered back on, and maybe this one had lost one or more of its legs at some point inspiring this approach.

    I've an X-plate 1936 No.1 with a silent burner too. Not sure if either of these should have them by rights, but they're both how I got them and from different sources. I do prefer the silent type in the house it must be said.

    IMG_8858.JPG IMG_8859.JPG IMG_8860.JPG IMG_8861.JPG
     
  5. igh371

    igh371 SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Hi Roger,
    That pump assembly is just what I would hope to find; original fitment for a stove of that age. There should be a fairly thin leather washer on the front side of that fixed backstop for the cup carrier to seal against on the pressure stroke. Nice to see the original brass petals insert also still in place to hold the leather cup in contact against the pump tube walls. All in all this is a very effective and efficient pump design. But so much more expensive to manufacture than the simplified 'modern' form which came in c.1909.
    Ian:thumbup:


    @Roger Baker
     
  6. Roger Baker

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    Hello Ian and thank you. I thought the backstop was rather a vague fit against the cup holder, and that explains perhaps why this is a bit reluctant to pump up easily. I'm not sure the pump leathers on sale today are thin enough to fit around the petals, as the ones I have and those on offer are made of boot leather it seems.

    I'm still in the dark about the silent burner being original for this model, though the one fitted does read Primus Sweden on the ring under the cap.
    All the best, and thank you once again.
    Roger.
     
  7. igh371

    igh371 SotM Winner Subscriber

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    The silent/roarer question is fairly straightforward. All Primus No.1 stoves were originally listed as equipped with roarer burners, and No.5s with silent burners. The burners themselves, however, are both interchangeable, and, especially in heavy use, can require routine service replacement. Rather like changing sparkplugs on a car! Consequently there are many stoves with 'wrong' burners on, often as a result of owner's preferences for circumstances of use; and sometimes just because of what was immediately to hand. All parts of a stove's history.
     
  8. Roger Baker

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    Thank you Ian. As I sort of suspected. I recently made the big mistake of standing the roarer off my 1939 Primus 51 in the dishwasher to try to clean it up non invasively. It didn't come as clean as I had expected, and the jet orifice had become enlarged. Whilst trying to replace the jet, it wound out with great difficulty, and a new jet wouldn't tighten up in the hole. Not sure if the new one was "duff" or the old one had brought a load of thread out with it. Anyhow after a rummage in the Misc. parts box I managed to find a replacement. These stoves are all getting old now, and not everything will withstand the prolonged use and heat, not to mention being undone. I can only imagine how often those who relied on them regularly, switched parts around as necessary. It's a good job there was a fair bit in common on thread sizes and dimensions in use back then, unlike nowadays.
    TTFN
    Roger
     
  9. Roger Baker

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    Having retrieved this from the garage, and become interested in it again i decided to give it a clean-up. This is the latest stage in this stove's reincarnation. Probably that'll be it for me and I'll dig something else out to fuss over. I got the brass tripod legs in a job lot of parts years ago, and never found anything suitable and deserving until now. This No.1 came with one rather badly fashioned leg anyhow, so it seemed a worthwhile deployment, and less in my box of assorted bits. I assume they are home made, but rather well executed in reality.
    Thanks to all who've contributed.
    Roger. IMG_8864.JPG IMG_8865.JPG
     
  10. Sternenlicht

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    Keep these nice legs! They make this common stove to a unique one!

    I like that shape!

    Ciao, Bastian
     
  11. ROBBO55

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    Congratulations Roger, it's cleaned up nicely :thumbup:
     
  12. Sternenlicht

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    Do not understand wrong, common shouldn't mean boring. I like that stove!

    Ciao, Bastian
     
  13. Roger Baker

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    Thank you all, for the words of support. I've always wondered what I'd end up doing with this one. I guess it's given me some inspiration, and I'm in "stove mode" for now and it seems the correct thing to continue with!
    Just dug out some old Brit stoves, so they're next on the agenda.