Early Zip Ztove

Discussion in 'Stove Forum' started by Daryl, Jun 4, 2020.

  1. Daryl

    Daryl United States Subscriber

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    Found in a backpack today at swap meet. Oiled motor and it runs. I did a bit of looking to find out when the early ones with 'C' size batteries where made but had no luck. Anyone date this one? Is this the same people that make the modern Zip Sierra stove? Anyone use one of these with charcoal? Might contact Zip Sierra to get the low down from them. Funny a second backpack had two red, white and blue Arno straps but no 99's rats! Will share in Gallery when I fire it up. Stay safe Daryl sunny SoCal
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  2. ArcticStoves

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    Hi Daryl: I'm hardly a stove expert, but these Zip Stoves were mentioned in the late 1970's hiking classic ''The Complete Walker'' a book by the now-departed elder, Colin Fletcher. I might be wrong, they might be later than that, and mentioned in the ''The New Complete Walker'' which came out closer to the mid-1980's.

    Never had one, but they are a grand idea!
     
  3. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner SotY Winner Subscriber

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    First generation, I’d say. 1973 or earlier. This ‘Off Belay’ mountaineering magazine in which the Zip stove was tested dates from 1973.

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    The testers mentioned they used charcoal (briquettes) in it, so yes, charcoal can be burned in it.

    The Zip Sierra is surely a descendant, judging by the features in common with the one I have. Remote battery pack and switch latterly obviously. I don’t know if the manufacturer of the Zip Sierra was the same company founded by the inventor, Fred Hottenroth, though.

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    John
     
  4. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark Subscriber

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    Greetings, All,

    I found my first Zip Ztove at "that same old swap meet", several decades ago, and it came with it's ratty old cardboard box (which was falling apart). I tried it with charcoal, and it work OK, but not as good as I'd hoped. Charcoal was the most clean fuel I tried, however. I also tried pine cones, which make a real mess out of everything, and created a hard pine tar residue that soured me on using that fuel again, unless it was an emergency. At least in that first Zip Ztove, it seemed that sticks were the best fuel. Easy to light, easy to refuel, sticks did a good job, though, of course, it left a real smoky mess of your pots. Over the years, I've bought more of those Zip Ztoves, though I do not use them. Here are a few photos of the ones I can find, right now. My oldest one, and it's ratty old box, are somewhere deep in the Hobbit Hole, and God knows where!!

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    And, a few more, one with it's complete cook set.

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    Got this last one at an Army Navy store, brand new, a long time ago. Looked interesting enough to add to my small collection of Zip Ztoves.

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    Sorry for the poor photos. Just snapped them with my cell phone, and the light wasn't that great. As for me, I find the Zip Ztoves to be interesting, and with proper fuels, they work well enough to warrant their use. But, I'm not one that likes sooty burner stoves, and this one is most certainly that, except when burning charcoal. For those who like cooking over a fire, these guys might be just the thing. One warning, though, above treeline, you will have to pack in your own fuel, as there is little to no fuel to be had up there. Take care, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc
     
  5. Daryl

    Daryl United States Subscriber

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    Thank you guys for the information. Feel free to post more about this 'dirty' stove if others want to add. I did read the many posts from 2011 about this stove. I Emailed ZZstoves.com which are in Al. now, they make the Sierra Stove today and they use the same logo as on my paper work. I ask the date the 'C' battery ones were made and if they are the same company that was in Ca. Notice on web page said they are closed until June 15 so it could be a while to get the story. I will see if I can get some action shot of this stove, early or late when it darker. Thanks again, Stay Safe Daryl
     
  6. Majicwrench

    Majicwrench Subscriber

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    "Found in a backpack" I ALWAYS give backpacks a shake to see if anything is inside when I see em for sale.

    I had a zip stove couple years back and sold it before I ever tried it. Looking forward to a report!
     
  7. Simes

    Simes Subscriber

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    A very interesting find @Daryl , and John has clearly done more historical work on fan stoves than I have. Great to discover one from that era.

    Silicon valley computer components combined with over supply of BBQ briquettes, result, new camp stove.

    Interesting charcoal was the design fuel, I always had a suspicion it might get too hot fan assisted, worth a trial in a Biolite or the Chengdu which needs a clean off burn on the grill. You could carry a few bits of charcoal if they last long enough to be an effective fuel source.
     
  8. Daryl

    Daryl United States Subscriber

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    Took the Zip Ztove for a test drive this morning and kicked in the turbo. Filled about 3/4 with 2" little finger size twigs, a squirt of DA and off it went. With a flip of the switch a lazy flame gets turbo charged which was very noticeable. Yellow flame turns brighter and the coals glow hotter. Needs very little wood to cook a quick meal and with fan on very little smoke. There was soot on bottom of pan. I did not see any embers drifting away from stove but would never use in a dry hay field. Could safely use where camp fires are permitted. If you like wood burners this stove would be a nice addition for quick meals. With fan on this stove can put out alot of heat or low heat with fan off. BSR No 3 tator tots eggs and diced pork belly. Stay safe 100_5277.JPG 100_5279.JPG 100_5280.JPG 100_5283.JPG 100_5285.JPG
     
  9. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    They've always been interesting little stoves, but the battery and motor thing to me doesn't appeal much. When I think how many times in former days I'd pull out a C or D flashlight to find it dead just when needed most...
     
  10. snwcmpr

    snwcmpr Subscriber

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    The TEG charging itself is a great development after this stove design.