Enameling and secondary burn?

Discussion in 'Stove Forum' started by Tucker15, Jun 14, 2021.

  1. Tucker15 India

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    Hello,

    I'm curious as to whether it is possible to enamel a plain iron stove after it has been already assembled, in the case of buying one from the second-hand market? I guess it would need to be disassembled and shipped to wherever you have your enameling done.


    My second question is whether any of the stoves have a secondary air combustion system, as I haven't been able to find anything about it online. Also a point of concern is the lack of a seal around the door to the firebox, how do you effectively control the fire if you cannot completely shut off oxygen? I would love to purchase a new little cod in the exact color I want, but it would seem that other small wood stoves of a similar price come with more features, albeit less pretty colors.
     
  2. Dutchmike

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    Hello Tucker, it seems you are talking about a woodstove or similar. This site is basicly about (classic) portable stoves for camping, using liquid fuels like kerosene or gasoline. It would be nice to welcome someone from Samoa though.
     
  3. ROBBO55

    ROBBO55 Subscriber

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    Welcome to CCS Tucker.
    Yes, a second hand stove would have to be disassembled before it could be enameled. It would also have to be sandblasted and probably acid cleaned also. Though the acid cleaning may be done by the enameler. Where you would get it done, I don't know.

    A secondary air combustion chamber?
    Are you talking about heating the wood without air to produce 'wood gas' , as fuel in the stove?
    Never seen one but look online at making charcoal.
     
  4. igh371

    igh371 SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Do you mean something like the combustion chamber 'air wash' system that is used for example by UK Clearview stoves (link). This system uses a super-heated downdraught system for introducing air into the combustion chamber. The super-heated air enables unburnt particles that would otherwise be emitted as smoke to be consumed inside the combustion chamber. This system is more than efficient enough for it to enable wood burning stoves to be used in UK Smoke Control areas, and with the added bonus that you get more heat from your fuel too. I've got 2 of these and no central heating.
     
  5. Lance

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    Some of the wood stoves used in the New England area of the United States, what is known elsewhere as the North East (other areas too I suppose) use a combustion chamber in the chimney to burn the unburned gasses. They look like the stove pipe has been expanded like a ballon in an area about twice the diameter of the stove pipe and about that long too. They do give off quite a bit of heat but the best part about them is they go a long way in preventing flue fires because they burn the creosote that would normally be sticking to the flue side walls and which could start the house on fire if allowed to burn freely.

    lance