Enders 9061D

Discussion in 'Enders' started by presscall, May 8, 2010.

  1. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner SotY Winner Subscriber

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    With all those components, you'd never think this was just one stove. Think Primus 210 by comparison. It's not just because the Enders has a regulated burner, an Optimus 111 doesn't have this many parts

    1273353233-1.JPG

    It's beautifully made. Even the hinge-pin connecting the two halves of the case is of brass

    1273353243-2.JPG

    The fuel tank's a work of art

    1273353252-3.JPG 1273353264-4.JPG 1273353276-5.JPG

    Where else would you find a primer cup built into a pair of antlers serving as two thirds of the pot rest?

    1273353285-6.JPG

    The burner control spindle and pricker control spindle components are meticulously engineered

    1273353303-7.JPG

    The pump tube with non-return valve and fuel cap with safety release valve for the Enders 9061D are the inner pair. The outer pair are for the Enders 9061 military version (olive drab case). The NRV and SRV are of different design

    1273353320-8.JPG

    The NRV cup on the 9061 military type doesn't contain a nitrile 'pip' but seals against a nitrile disc located in the end cavity of the pump tube

    1273353335-9.JPG

    The pump cup crops up as a topic in CCS posts from time to time because the cup washer isn't easily replaced because of the rivetted construction.

    Another detail to be aware of is that the seal of the cup against the pump shaft doesn't rely on a taper seal, metal-to-metal, as in a Primus pump but depends on a nitrile insert at the point where the pump shaft diameter reduces. That's a point to watch if it's perished or absent - the pump will be down on pumping efficiency if it is, even if the leather cup washer is good

    1273353346-10.JPG

    The other end of the pump. An 'O' ring will serve for the pump tube to tank seal at a pinch, but I like to use a flat sectioned nitrile washer to offer a greater area of contact. I really wouldn't fancy a gusher of pressurised white gas coming out of there with the stove lit

    1273353365-11.JPG

    Here are the fuel control valve and pricker control components lined up ready for reassembly. It's a case of installing them together because they're linked together to enable that push-me-pull-you relationship for stowage in the stove case

    1273353380-12.JPG

    Assembled

    1273353390-13.JPG

    The antlers pot rest fits on the base of the burner

    1273353463-14.JPG

    Assembled

    1273353490-15.JPG

    That pot rest has a twin-horned projection on the base, under the primer cup that fits in a track to operate that neat foldaway action the stove has and this is where taking out the hinge-pin for the two halves of the case pays off. It makes it a bit easier to do

    1273353516-16.JPG

    The hinge-pin is then pushed home

    1273353529-17.JPG

    The burner bell and silent burner components

    1273353541-18.JPG

    Stove reassembled and fired up

    1273353554-19.JPG

    Great stove ...

    1273353567-20.JPG

    ... the End-ers

    John
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 27, 2015
  2. RonPH

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    John, that enders is definitely not field maintainable. Easy to loose one of the smaller parts. Thanks for sharing again. I guess I will scratch this model on my list.....unless its a freebee.

    Ron
     
  3. mbechtel

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    Hi John,
    I've got one of these, but I've never taken it down to every single part like that! Holy Smokes!
    I'd say it's the Swiss Watch of stoves in a folding box. I'm not sure wether I should be impressed by it's incredible mechanics or cuss at it. I think as long as mine works I will choose to be impressed. If I ever have to disassemble it to that degree, I'll probably be cussing. You're a brave soul to rip that thing apart.
     
  4. Texas

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    Interesting. I have one that has what may be a date of 1962 on a red metal instruction tag in the lid and the case is an army drab green color. None of the parts are brass though. They are some sort of non-magnetic metal but don't know what.

    Bob
     
  5. Knight84

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    You have a 9061 Military Enders Bob.
    Most of the parts are brass or steel. They are just given a matte chrome finish.

    Great work John! :clap: :clap: :clap:

    Not sure about taking out the push pin but hey it works.

    It is field maintainable Ron. The German military used the same stove. It just has a lot more parts than say a Optimus 111. More to go wrong maybe but they are solid stoves.

    Jeff
     
  6. bajabum

    bajabum R.I.P.

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    :shock:
    I just oiled the pump cup on mine... :whistle:
     
  7. hikin_jim

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    BEAUTIFUL stove, John. I've had "Enders envy" ever since I saw one at one of our local mini-meets. They really are well built stoves. The design and manufacture are of such quality that one is instantly drawn to it.

    HJ
     
  8. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Hi John, Another great photo-essay on a truly classic stove.
    I have such a stove, and do operate it. However,I do question the philosophy of choosing this model for Military issue.
    It has more in common with a fine mechanical watch or sewing machine than a classic stove. Beautifully engineered, but far too many small parts, most of which a critical for safe and efficient operation.

    I am reminded of the WW2 poem "Naming of Parts" when thinking about how you would instruct infantry troops on use and maintenace of a military Enders stove:

    http://www.solearabiantree.net/namingofparts/namingofparts.html

    Best Regards,
    Kerophile
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 1, 2015
  9. itchy

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    Beautiful work John,

    Your ability to get thing apart, cleaned up and then back together never ceases to amaze me. I'd get stuck 10% into the disassembly.
     
  10. Sparky

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    Is this a German stove? It seems to reflect a German passion for sophisticated engineering and manufacturing that is all but un-sustainable for the common soldier. Beautiful stove none the less.
     
  11. lanevitt

    lanevitt Subscriber

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    The Panzer tank was just the same during the second world war, its drive train was so complex that if a crew had problems, they would abandon the tank after throwing in a few stick grenades !!

    As was the Machine gun of theirs the MG34 a superb design but over engineered, so was born the MG42.
     
  12. Matukat

    Matukat Subscriber

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    Amazing fettle John! I have the 9061 military as others here. For what it's worth, the last I looked I believe "Omaha Surplus" was still selling them. MHO, it's a VERY elegant design. Working properly, the box opens, the pan supports slide into place, prime and light.
    Your work is wonderful, wish I were as good at it!
     
  13. -/-

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    Their website is bonkers :cry:

    www.omahas.com
     
  14. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner SotY Winner Subscriber

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    Thanks all for the feedback and comments. I enjoyed your fettling tutorial on replacing the graphite packing Jeff. You're right about the pricker spindle packing being difficult! Mine came out with a bit of tugging and jiggling of the spindle

    Jeff's graphite packing replacement tutorial


    Jeff answered that one - tank and other brass parts (including the burner bell) have been given a matte chrome finish

    Here's the pump cap on my military Enders 9061, which shows the finish of the outer surface well. Mine's of 1962 manufacture too ('Baujahr' = year of construction)

    1273418093-21.JPG

    In terms of maintenance, it is a very well made stove and the sort of stripdown of it I did for fun really isn't essential practice!

    Nevertheless, let me show you a close-up of the original pump tube and safety release valve seals

    1273418105-22.JPG

    You can see from the chipped edges how the rubber had acquired a hard plastic consistency with age. They really had to be replaced!

    Consequences if not? The tank might have pressurised but would have leaked air/fuel vapour. At best, the stove wouldn't have reached optimum pressure and operated as well as it could. At worst, a flamer!

    Fettling a safety release valve isn't recommended by some, but we're dealing with an old stove here with no prospect of a new spare being available. 'New old stock' wouln't necessarily provide the correct release pressure either.

    Fettling the SRV with a nitrile pip of identical thickness to the piece of chipped 'plastic' and ensuring that the tensioning spring is in good condition is surely a reasonable, and in my opinion, safe option.

    John
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2015
  15. BernieDawg Banned

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    John, a big thanks to both you and Jeff for your tutorials. :clap:

    I have two of the beasties. One is intact and working (thanks to gracious and generous parts help from a UK stovie). The other was gifted to me and arrived completely parted out. I was dreading having to take apart my intact stove just so that I could puzzle out all the parts and where they go. Your invaluable posts have solved the problem for me. I even have some of the graphite tape to hand for the packing on the disassembled stove. :D/

    For those equipped with both the stove and a midi cap, they work well together. Though, perhaps a bit too much heat directed sideways, rather than upward, from the midi. The mini will also fit, but is either overpowered by the stove or sits too low for proper air/fuel mix. (Not promoting here, just providing more reasons/excuses to go play with stoves if you happen to have both items, stove and cap. ;) :p :lol: )

    Best,
    Gary
     
  16. Big BTU

    Big BTU Subscriber

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    John,

    Thank you for a fantastic tutorial! This is one of my favorite stoves and I have several of them and had fettled all of them back to working condition but I NEVER did a complete breakdown such as yours. :shock: :mrgreen:

    Thank you very much again for sharing.
     
  17. ajvuik

    ajvuik Subscriber

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    Ah yes, the Enders 9060/1. That is German engineering at its finest.

    I have an Enders 9061 and is hasn't failed me yet, although I do probably need to service it's NRV anytime soon. But I guess these stoves where designed so that didn't have to be serviced in the field... I guess that was a bit to optimistic imho.
     
  18. Knight84

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    Thanks John! :clap:
    Sorry to steal some of your lime light or thunder. :oops: ](*,) :doh: I was halfway through writing my post when I saw yours. Great minds think alike eh. ;)

    I think it is important to understand that the Enders 9061 is not a simple stove. But I believe the common soldier would be able to fix this stove. They can break down a rifle or operate a tank. Lets give them some credit. ;) The Military 9061 came with a full set of spares and wrench too. You can get the whole stove apart with the wrench and get to the NRV. The Optimus 111 would have a hard time at that. Sure the 111T multi tool would allow that. But that stove wasn't around then. You would need a wrench and a nrv tool to service a 111.

    Best Regards,
    Jeff
     
  19. Mikespike

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    Hi John,
    Thanks for the excellent pictures and making the point about how many parts this stove consists of. I have one but did only replace seals as you say. Definitely a fun stove for us guys who like to fettle but agree with other posters that this may not be the ideal stove for the ordinary soldier :)

    cheers
    Mike
     
  20. idahostoveguy

    idahostoveguy R.I.P.

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    Hello John,

    Beautiful work! I love the tear down and pics you put together. You've done a marvelous job on that stove. This will definitely be a post that I will come back to time and again as I have this same stove on my list of fettles yet to be done. I really appreciate the End-er-ing.

    Nice!

    sam