Enmanskök M/40 (Aluminum version)

Discussion in 'Trangia' started by EddieJ, Dec 16, 2012.

  1. EddieJ

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    Following on from the stainless version as posted by shed-man Steve, here is an aluminium version.

    By deduction it would appear that the most obvious difference between the two pan sets, is that with the aluminium version, the handle and catch have been rivitted in place.
    The aluminium also appears to be of an anodised finish. As accurately as I can tell, the weight of the complete set including fuel in the plastic bottle and the Trangia burner, is 1,120grams.
    The pan set on its own weighs 720grams.
    Capacity wise, the small pan holds 500ml of fluid, whilst the larger pan holds 1000ml.

    My set has the serial numbers NC65 on all components other than the burner, which just has Trangia and the three crowns. The burner was new, so my guess is that it could be a civilian designated burner.

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    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2015
  2. Christer Carlsson

    Christer Carlsson Moderator SotM Winner

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    Since it's out of aluminum, it just as well might be model 44 instead of 40.
    I don't know personally how to tell the difference between an alu m/40 and a m/44 just by the look of them, but hopefully someone else might know.
    It sounds plausible that the riveted handle is used on alu-versions.
     
  3. Svea 121

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    I have an aluminum one. It is stamped HP82 inside the lid (pan). It is painted dark green.
     
  4. Lennart F Sweden

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    They were usually painted dark green from the factory but some early ones seem to possibly been more grey or brown - when they were in military use you rarely found other than green, often burned black or sooty. The windshields were either matt black or anodized dark brown.
    The unpainted finish that's common today is probably a result of extensive cleaning with the intention to make it look like new.
     
  5. Odd

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    Probably chemical paint stripper...
     
  6. Lennart F Sweden

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    I think so...
    And today I got my first M/40 stainless - already had two complete M/44.
    This stainless is painted with a coarse matt military brown outside but the lower part has got a light retouch with the M/44 dark green to cover some burned paint - this comprehends with my theory that the rare grey ones are the earliest M/40 that were made of aluminium. Later M/40 were made stainless because the authorities feared a shortage of aluminium as result of air warfare.
     
  7. Lennart F Sweden

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    The military burner was made by Trangia and some other companies and resembles to the 1960s Trangia design but is considerable bigger and holds about twice the fuel of the civilian ones - the only storm cooker I know that works with both sizes are late versions of the polish Wisla.
     
  8. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    Always have liked that set. When I first started CCS about 16 years ago, you could buy them around here at a (now long-gone) surplus store for $7.50 apiece.
     
  9. Lennart F Sweden

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    Took a closer look at my M/40 and found some obvious differences in forms of handles, no year stamps and the only marking is the name of the factory - well known cutlery brand Gense.
    My M/44s are stamped NC62 and NC66 where the numbers are production year and NC is the code of one of the most common makers.
    Burners and windshields were separate items in the equipment list and usually produced some years later with SVEA as most common burner brand.
    This oldie seems to have been in the possession of the swedish soldier "1616 Berndtsson". IMG_20180519_215300.jpg IMG_20180519_215407.jpg