Fettling the Brandt & Steele 2-Burner Suitcase Stove

Discussion in 'Fettling Forum' started by Tony Press, Feb 11, 2019.

  1. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

    Online
    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2013
    Messages:
    5,160
    Location:
    Stinkpot Bay, Howden, Tasmania, Australia
    This stove is in the Reference Gallery here.

    The stove required a bit more than spit and polish to get it working.


    As it came:

    IMG_1465.jpg


    The stove was fully disassembled.


    The tank

    One task was to clean the great globs of plumbers' solder from the filler cap boss.

    IMG_1481.jpg


    This was achieved by using a propane torch to melt the solder, then wipe it off the stove with fine steel wool (wire wool). The tank was wrapped in wet cloth to stop solder from melting elsewhere.
    IMG_1482.jpg

    IMG_1485.jpg

    IMG_1486.jpg


    Having cleaned up the solder, I then had to re-solder the boss in a couple of spots.
    IMG_1488.jpg

    I then used a Dremel with a fine grind, and 800 grit wet-and-dry paper to clean up the remaining solder.
    IMG_1489.jpg


    The final result of this work was this.
    P1040235.jpg



    The biggest task was to get the tank functioning properly and not leaking. The fuel line from the tank to the burner had failed at some stage and had been glued to the tank with epoxy.


    After applying some heat to the epoxy, I unscrewed the fuel line from the tank.
    IMG_1472.jpg

    Disassembled the connecting nuts, noticing another dodgy soldering job, and some asbestos packing.
    IMG_1473.jpg


    Solder was smeared over everything so I re-threaded the thread on the end of the tank fuel pick up.
    IMG_1478.jpg


    In doing this, I noticed that the fuel pickup was held to the tank only by a small amount of solder and the remnants of epoxy. My first attempt at resolving this issue resulted in the fuel pick-up falling into the tank.:( ](*,)
    IMG_1500.jpg



    The only solution was to take the end off the tank. I hung the tank from the bench vise and used a propane torch to heat the solder holding the end cap on the tank:

    IMG_1501.jpg

    IMG_1502.jpg

    IMG_1510.jpg

    The offending fuel pick-up. Note the dodgy solder.
    IMG_1507.jpg


    Taking the end cap off the tank also melted the solder that sealed the convex brass cap covering the tank mounting nut preventing the tank from leaking through the nut.
    IMG_1508.jpg


    I re-soldered it back on to the end cap.

    IMG_1542.jpg

    IMG_1543.jpg

    IMG_1548.jpg

    IMG_1555.jpg



    Putting the fuel pickup back in the tank.


    While the end cap of the tank was off I refitted the fuel pick-up. One of the advantages of having hung the tank to get the end cap off, was that solder fell to the floor and splattered into thin sheets.

    IMG_1514.jpg

    I collected these up and punched a hole through them so that they neatly fitted over the fuel pick-up line and sat flush against the pick-up nut that would sit inside the tank.

    IMG_1515.jpg

    IMG_1516.jpg

    IMG_1518.jpg


    I then fitted the nut that sits outside the tank, and re-soldered the fuel pick-up line in the tank
    IMG_1520.jpg


    The next task was to carefully replace the tank end cap.

    The old solder on the tank and end cap was cleaned with a Dremel sand paper.
    IMG_1549.jpg


    I filled the cap that sits over the end cap mounting nut with water and used a propane torch to re-heat the solder and get a "first cut" seal of the end cap to the tank. I then carefully used a fine wire solder to fix any gaps in the seam:

    IMG_1557.jpg

    IMG_1560.jpg


    A subsequent pressure test showed that there were no leaks!


    The heat shield

    One of the brackets that fits the heat shield to the tank had been badly soldered in the past and needed a bit of work. I cleaned up the bad soldering as above.
    IMG_1683.jpg


    The other components of the stove

    The NRV.
    IMG_1474.jpg

    Compared to a standard Swedish Optimus NRV.
    IMG_1591.jpg


    The burners were both fitted with copper washers above and below the spirit dish. I attempted to refit with a crushable copper washer under the spirit dish and a fibre washer above, but this did not work out - I could not get a tight seal against the fuel line. I eventually used a 2mm thick lead washer below and a fibre washer above the spirit dish. Given the configuration of the stove, I am not concerned that the lead will reach a temperature that would compromise the seal.
    IMG_1476.jpg


    The burners were both very dirty and had obviously been well used.
    IMG_1493.jpg


    I cleaned all the burner parts in dilute citric acid solution, and then put the burners two in the ultrasonic cleaner for a few hours.

    I re-assembled them with new graphite and set the prickers to 4 clicks:

    IMG_1597.jpg

    IMG_1598.jpg

    IMG_1599.jpg

    IMG_1601.jpg


    Replacing the nipple (it's much easier to do this with the burner upside down).
    IMG_1603.jpg


    Testing

    The stove was re-assembled. I didn't do much work on the steel suitcase except clean it up, solder a bit of rust and panel beat some dings (except later when I made a new pot rest).

    I filled the tank with kerosene and gave it its first run. No leaks! Burning very well.

    Note the steel bars that came with the stove as pot rests.
    IMG_1685.jpg



    New pot rest

    Having made sure the whole this was running properly, I decided to make a fold up pot rest to fit where one was originally.

    I used 6mm stainless steel, bent freehand with the help of a MAPP torch, a vise and a stainless steel tube:

    IMG_1716.jpg

    IMG_1717.jpg

    IMG_1718.jpg

    IMG_1721.jpg


    Roughly based on the Optimus Campingo pot rest, here is my first cut. The problem was the centre bracing bar was in line with the filler cap making it impossible to close the lid of the suitcase!
    P1040261.jpg

    Mk 2.
    IMG_1766.jpg

    The pot rest works well even with two full kettles.
    IMG_1769.jpg


    Cheers

    Tony


    @presscall @Rodger Willows
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2019
  2. Rodger Willows

    Rodger Willows Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2017
    Messages:
    28
    Location:
    Tasmania
    Thank you for sharing a wonderful piece of fettling! @Tony Press
    Rodger
     
  3. teckguy_58

    teckguy_58 United States Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2011
    Messages:
    881
    Location:
    Washington USA
    @Tony Press

    Well done, Tony.
    Looks great and is running well.
    Thanks for sharing.

    Cheers,

    Norman
     
  4. shagratork

    shagratork United Kingdom Moderator Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2005
    Messages:
    9,591
    Location:
    Durham, N.E. England
    An awesome fettle!!! :clap: :clap: :clap:
     
  5. Rangie

    Rangie Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2012
    Messages:
    1,385
    Location:
    Caithness, Far North of Scotland
    Brilliant job!
    What an excellent, usable stove that is :thumbup:

    Alec.
     
  6. Marc

    Marc Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2015
    Messages:
    2,741
    Location:
    Oregon, USA
    Fantastic, well done. Nothing like getting into the bones of a stove.

    Nice job on the pot support. Are those stainless rods brazed or welded?
     
  7. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

    Online
    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2013
    Messages:
    5,160
    Location:
    Stinkpot Bay, Howden, Tasmania, Australia
    @Marc

    The stainless steel was brazed (hard-soldered) using a MAPP torch and 1.5mm silver-solder rod.

    Cheers

    Tony
     
  8. Marc

    Marc Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2015
    Messages:
    2,741
    Location:
    Oregon, USA
    Thank you sir! Didn't know silver solder would work on stainless, it just looked brazed and so I asked. That's fantastic.
     
  9. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

    Online
    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2013
    Messages:
    5,160
    Location:
    Stinkpot Bay, Howden, Tasmania, Australia
    Marc

    It was far easier to braze than I expected.

    I set it all up on a furnace heat brick. I used flux, applied the MAPP flame until the stainless steel was red, then touched the area with the silver-solder rod, keeping the MAPP flame on the area until the braze flowed.

    I surprised myself with how neat it was. I think the trick was having the two pieces very hot before applying the brazing rod; and being sparing with the amount of braze.

    Cheers

    Tony
     
  10. Marc

    Marc Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2015
    Messages:
    2,741
    Location:
    Oregon, USA
    Good stuff, thank you for the tips. Great work!
     
  11. ROBBO55

    ROBBO55 Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2014
    Messages:
    754
    Location:
    Somersby, New South Wales, Australia
    Excellent work Tony! :clap:
     
  12. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

    Online
    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2004
    Messages:
    8,316
    Location:
    Tacoma, Washinghton, USA
    Spectacular, Tony!
     
  13. MrAlexxx

    MrAlexxx Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2015
    Messages:
    888
    Wow all that soldering must of wore you out! lol Well done!!!

    Alex
     
  14. ally

    ally Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2014
    Messages:
    224
    I'm pleased with myself changing a cap washer

    I have much to learn...

    :)
     
  15. Simes

    Simes Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2004
    Messages:
    3,139
    Location:
    I'm on the way....
    Brilliant job there @Tony Press and congrats firstly on a job well done and second on a fine tutorial.

    @ally I'm easily pleased as well.
     
  16. redspeedster

    redspeedster Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2006
    Messages:
    2,457
    Location:
    County Durham