Fire Precautions

Discussion in 'Stove Paraffinalia' started by Spiritburner, Jun 16, 2019.

  1. Spiritburner

    Spiritburner Admin Subscriber

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    Of course it won't be needed but seemed an apt addition to the 'stove room'

    fire extinguisher.jpg
     
  2. IvanN

    IvanN United States Subscriber

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    That’s a cool addition. I’ve only needed such a thing when me wife wasn’t home, for some reason. She does act as a restraint to me lighting stoves in the front room.:roll:
     
  3. ROBBO55

    ROBBO55 Subscriber

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    Ross It looks perfectly at home in the stove room.
    A nice addition. :thumbup:
     
  4. Greeley

    Greeley United States Subscriber

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    I have one in my basement shop and one in the garage. Have not had to use either one yet but better safe than sorry. By the way Kidde had a recall on home fire extinguishers, not commercial ones, and I had four of mine replaced by them for free. Check out the Kidde website for details. Tom
     
  5. snwcmpr

    snwcmpr Subscriber

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    That looks nice there and that one looks much better than my models.
     
  6. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber SotM Winner

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    An old Pyrene extinguisher I think? @Spiritburner
    Carbon tetrachloride as the extinguishing fluid.
     
  7. SimonFoxxx

    SimonFoxxx Subscriber

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    Like stove founts, these fire extinguishers were usually made of brass, but some were chrome plated. They contained carbon tetrachloride, as advised by PressCall. Pity they produced some phosgene, when the fluid hit the flames.

    Cheers
    Simon Foxxx
     
  8. Spiritburner

    Spiritburner Admin Subscriber

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    Minimax. Aye - I'll not be letting that stuff out!
     
  9. nmp

    nmp United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Not good on hot metal so I have heard it gives of a deadly gas!
    Nick
     
  10. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    I was involved in some litigation about 30 or so years ago involving chlorinated hydrocarbons in paint strippers. They are nice for the task, given their high molecular weight.

    However, it was not uncommon for impatient DIY homeowners and others to apply a torch to 'speed things up.' Phosgene was the result. In the course of things, I learned a lot about phosgene. Much of the literature arose out of WWI, where the stuff was freely used. Nasty stuff, phosgene.

    One thing I seem to remember after all these years is that it is said to smell like newly-mown grass. This gave the men in the trenches some warning, sometimes.

    The other thing I remember is to avoid chlorinated molecules when you can.
     
  11. Marc

    Marc Subscriber

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    Learned that one doing auto mechanics. Carb cleaner and brake cleaner are largely interchangeable, EXCEPT in the case of chlorinated brake cleaner. Do not use chlorinated brake cleaner for carb cleaner, the exhaust when burning that stuff may kill you.

    @Spiritburner Beautiful fire extinguisher. Great photography and editing, too.