Full fettle of a Primus No.30

Discussion in 'Fettlers Master Class' started by Tony Press, Oct 11, 2016.

  1. LowellBoy

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    Hi, Tony! I've just discovered this site...and your inputs! Thank you so much for your patient and expert work, and for share a view of it! -Bob L., Belmont MA in USA
     
  2. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

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    @LowellBoy

    Thanks, Bob. I’m glad I could be of some use.

    Cheers

    Tony
     
  3. JP2

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    @Tony Press

    Hi, very nice, what is, It will be lacquered with VHT high temperature gloss clear and baked at 94C. Aerosol was not enough ???? And how long will you bake it. Very Inspiring. Thank for sharring
     
  4. JP2

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    Autosol, sorry
     
  5. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

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    @JP2

    On stoves that I've polished, I often use a clear coat to preserve the polished finish.

    In this case, Autosol was the polish and VHT-brand clear coat was used to keep the polished finish. Note: When these stoves were originally manufactured they were polished then lacquered before being sold.

    The clear coat I used requires baking at 94C (200F) for 1 hour to harden it and make it resistant to fuel spills.

    These days I usually use an automobile clear coat that will harden over time (7 days or more); or harden rapidly if baked at 65C for an hour.

    Cheers

    Tony
     
  6. JP2

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    @Tony Press

    Ok for that, now does that mean a stove with patima has no lacquered and if you like it that way, you should protect it with lacquer, also when you did polish a stove, does that mean that you did removed the stove protection.

    Thank you very much Tony with your explanations cause it clarified many things I have seen before.
     
  7. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

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    @JP2

    My views are:

    1. Protecting patina. If you have a stove that has good patina and you want to protect it, don’t lacquer (or clear coat) it. Clean the dirt off it with mild soap and then apply bees’ wax or good quality car polish.

    2. When you polish a stove to the extent I did above, you have removed all the original lacquer.

    3. Stoves lose lacquer through use. You can find stoves with a lot (or almost all) lacquer remaining. In these cases I usually clean with soap and apply beeswax.

    Tony
     
  8. JP2

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  9. Punch

    Punch Canada Subscriber

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    After removing NRV on a 1972 Hippolito there was a lead washer at bottom of tube which took a little picking away to remove it. Will be using Fettle box washer instead of lead.
     
  10. mortada aljanabi Saudi Arabia

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  11. Simes

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    @Tony Press. Yes a very nice.job and a timely resurrection for the work need on my new Optimus 5.

    I may use the toothpaste barrier to prevent run off of excess solder, and try and capture progress as you have done here.

    Well, once I get some spare time that is.

    One thing I did find useful, and has been suggested previously is the use of a paint scraper for removing paint from glass. It was helpful in my Turm work.