Gloria Light Company OXO Gas Camping Stove

Discussion in 'Other Brands' started by BernieDawg, Apr 10, 2010.

  1. BernieDawg Banned

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    Hola Stovies

    Here is a Gloria Light Company OXO Gas Camping Stove. The stove was purchased from a fellow in Amity, Oregon who had found it in a junk shop near Amity.
    The Gloria Light Company was a Chicago, Illinois based firm that started up in 1907. During the early part of their operations they produced lanterns, lamps and "hollow wire" lighting. You can see some lovely Gloria lanterns at Terry Marsh's website at this link:
    http://tgmarsh.faculty.noctrl.edu/intllantag.html

    Apparently, their lanterns/lights were designed to burn either gasoline or kerosene.

    The stove I found appears in the advertisements section of a 1922 Popular Mechanics you can view at this link:
    http://books.google.com/books?id=LtoDAAAAMBAJ&lpg=RA1-PA126&dq=gloria camp oxo gas&lr&pg=RA1-PA126#v

    During the 1920's the company promoted OXO Gas as a fuel. OXO Gas, as described in the company's ads, appears to have been vaporized kerosene. So, this stove was designed to operate with kerosene. I didn't know that and fueled it with Coleman fuel as it looked to me very much like a white gas burner. It works as well on Coleman fuel as kerosene in my testing. The first American dual-fuel stove? ;)

    Here are a few more links to some interesting advertising by the company:
    Heaters to Survive Icy Blasts Ad, Popular Mechanics, August 1925:
    http://books.google.com/books?id=QNsDAAAAMBAJ&lpg=RA1-PT1&dq=gloria camp oxo gas&lr&pg=RA1-PT1#v

    Furnace/Range Conversion Ad, Popular Science, December 1924:
    http://books.google.com/books?id=FSkDAAAAMBAJ&lpg=PA148&dq=gloria Light oxo&pg=PA148#v

    Testimonials by Arctic Explorers Ad, Popular Mechanics, October 1923:
    http://books.google.com/books?id=XdoDAAAAMBAJ&lpg=RA1-PA152&dq=gloria Light oxo&pg=RA1-PA152#v

    In my research, I was unable to find references to the company after 1932, so I suspect that the company did not survive the Great Depression. If we allow that this stove could be from 1922, then it's 88 years old.

    I suspect that this stove may be rather rare, and so, I have prepared a large number of photos to post. Thanks for the patience of all concerned.

    Before I go to the photos, I'd like to make some observations. The little disks on the burners are made of a ceramic material and are quite fragile. The company mentions in their ads the use of "lava" and I suspect these disks are what they are referring to. The generator has no cleaning needle in it. The generator is preheated by a separate burner arrangement surrounded by a fibrous material. I do not know what the fibrous material is. I have been choosing to wet the fibrous material with spirit to preheat the generator for operation and that has been working quite well.

    There is a small plate atop the manifold. When removed, it allows more air to flow into the mix. I have found that removing the plate after the stove has been started improves the quality of the burn. Perhaps this is an early mix adjustment similar in function to Colemans little start-up lever?

    The tank is of steel and looks to have been constructed with rivets and then sealed with solder. The tire valve on the stove may or may not be original to the stove and is soldered in place. The brass fuel filler and air valve has a steel check ball in it's base and resembles and functions like the similar filler/air valve on early Coleman products.

    The stove weighs 15 1/2 pounds dry. Most of the weight is in the cast iron burners, grates and manifold. It's a bit top-heavy.

    There is no way to use the burners separately, nor is there any adjustment available in the flame size. When it's on, it's on; when it's off, it's off.

    There is a rod threaded into the base of the manifold. The threaded part of this rod is only long enough to thread into the manifold and it does not extend into the manifold. I suspect it may be the way to drain the manifold should one flood it with fuel and that that is it's purpose.

    Sadly, the control knob fell apart in my hand when touched! I've got it glued up at the moment and will shoot a picture of it later and add it to this thread. It does not appear in any of these photos as it was under repair.

    The pressure gauge works just fine and is "red-lined" at what I take to be 15psi.

    1270928754-IMGP2773.jpg 1270928768-IMGP2775.jpg 1270928779-IMGP2776.jpg 1270928798-IMGP2777.jpg 1270928805-IMGP2778.jpg 1270928811-IMGP2779.jpg 1270928825-IMGP2780.jpg 1270928832-IMGP2781.jpg 1270928843-IMGP2782.jpg 1270928852-IMGP2783.jpg 1270928860-IMGP2788.jpg 1270928871-IMGP2789.jpg 1270928880-IMGP2790.jpg 1270928894-IMGP2792.jpg 1270928969-IMGP2793.jpg 1270928988-IMGP2794.jpg 1270928998-IMGP2796.jpg 1270929011-IMGP2798.jpg 1270929025-IMGP2799.jpg


    More photos (especially the cool burning shots) coming up when I reply. Back in a moment.
     
  2. BernieDawg Banned

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    And, yes, it has passed the "tea test". :lol:

    1270929760-IMGP2800.jpg 1270929769-IMGP2801.jpg 1270929779-IMGP2802.jpg 1270929788-IMGP2803.jpg 1270929796-IMGP2804.jpg 1270929805-IMGP2805.jpg 1270929814-IMGP2807.jpg 1270929823-IMGP2808.jpg 1270929831-IMGP2724.jpg 1270929838-IMGP2732.jpg 1270929845-IMGP2744.jpg 1270929852-IMGP2750_2.jpg 1270929859-IMGP2752.jpg 1270929868-IMGP2755.jpg

    Hope you enjoyed this one. I'll post later on the missing knob and perhaps some burning-on-kero shots since all these are of Coleman fuel. If I've mis-spoken on the history, or if you have some other thoughts on operation, materials, design or what have you, please speak up and let us know.

    Best,
    Gary
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 27, 2015
  3. Big BTU

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    Gary,

    your Gloria stove throws the coolest flame pattern :p . I saw the one of these that was recently on Ebay and was wondering how it would look when lit! She looks like a beast too, how heavy is it?

    Thank you for sharing.
     
  4. joakim_stromberg@yahoo.co

    joakim_stromberg@yahoo.co Subscriber

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    Wow, that was just impressing!
    what a stove
    Joakim
     
  5. RonPH

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    Hey Gary, another UFO looking flame stove there :thumbup: Now thats what I call even flame pattern. Nice work on it buddy. Are you going to do a full cosmetic restoration on this...at least on the burners as the tank still has markings which perhaps you would like to preserve using automotive clear coat if the heat does not reach that area.

    Ron
     
  6. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Afternoon, BernieDawg,

    One of the things that I dearly love about CCS, is that, just when we think we've seen it all, something new and outstanding comes down the pike!! Your absolutely wonderful stove is a brilliant example of that theory in action!! WOW!! :thumbup: :thumbup: :shock: :shock: ;) 8) :D :D :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:

    You mentioned that, when you saw this, "you had to have it", and now I can see why, Gary!! VERY nice old stove, very unique, and very rare, I'd say. I can't think of a better person to own such a wonderful treasure, than you, my Friend!! Well done, all around, and thanks, so very much, for sharing this wonderful stove with us! :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: Take care, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc
     
  7. z1ulike

    z1ulike United States SotM Winner SotY Winner Subscriber

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    That is easily the most interesting stove I've ever seen. It looks like there's a wick just in front of the six little burners below. How does that work? Do you soak the wick with meths to begin with, then light the 6 lower burners to heat the fuel going to the upper burners?

    Ben
     
  8. mr optimus

    mr optimus United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hi Gary what a outstanding stove i have never seen one like it and i also love the flame pattern its so unique and very interesting the most unusual
     
  9. Kingreddobermann

    Kingreddobermann Subscriber

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    It's amazing to think that my grandparents were young when this thing was manufactured. Tho we may never know exactly how it burned when new, it had to be real similar to what it is now. I would presume, Gary, you burned Coleman fuel in it? What I think is interesting is the way they set up the pre-heater. Not quite what I had in mind from the pictures I saw of it. Very impressive, and enough to make any ultra-lighter puke! Congratulations, an excellent find.
     
  10. -/-

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    Dang that thing is built like a V8.
    Intended for (food)industry with that big tank?
    It's so odd that it's interesting :-)
     
  11. yonadav

    yonadav Subscriber

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    Nothing beats cast-iron burners!
     
  12. Jan-Willem

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    That is a stunning piece of engineering. It is so strange a design like that can be somehow lost or forgotten.
     
  13. idahostoveguy

    idahostoveguy R.I.P.

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    Gary, that is so awesome! One of the most interesting stoves or burners ever. Wow!

    sam
     
  14. DAVE GIBSON

    DAVE GIBSON Subscriber

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    what a find!..looks like you could hit it with a brick and would still work.
     
  15. danta

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    .... very very nice :lol:
     
  16. Matukat

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    Amazing stove, but you know that!!
     
  17. linux_author

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    what kind of pan fits on the bottom row of burners?

    looks like you could make some spanking quesadillas on the top burners!
     
  18. hydro451

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    Hi all,

    Gorgeous Gary, the flames a perfect and the it looks just magical :mrgreen: :lol: :) :clap: - super cool to me - love it

    I'd stick with coleman fuel - looks perfect !

    Tom
     
  19. Hotlites

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    Hi Gary, I have two of these Gloria Stoves but I don't have the pressure gauge on either stove and these don't have that removable cast disc either. I haven't lit either one but I knew they were Kerosene stoves. Interesting they run fine on Coleman fuel also. I have an early Gloria Light Co. Sales Booklet that shows the stove but the description and photo do not include a model number. Larry
     
  20. Hotlites

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    Gary, The Gloria Booklet I have is probably dated around 1914 or so. The description reads;

    The Oxo-Gas Camp Stove

    The Stove of Many Uses

    Noiseless - Smokeless - Odorless

    The Oxo-Gas Camp Stove fills a long felt want for camping parties, motorists and yachtsmen. Simple, compact, economical. Dimensions: Width 7 in., Height 13 in., Length 14 in. Oil capacity 1 1/2 gallons. Will run 9 to 12 hours on one gallon of kerosene.

    It's intersting they gave all the specs other than its weight!! Cheers! Larry