Good oil for pump leather

Discussion in 'Fettling Forum' started by k1rod, Sep 8, 2009.

  1. Matukat

    Matukat Subscriber

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    I knew I could probably make a passable pump leather if I put my mind to it, but Sefa's are PERFECT and making one ( for me ) would entail finding the right tube to make a punch out of or trying to cut a perfect circle with a razor knife and then trying to form the thing in a home-made cobbled up mold made of wood.... ( if I am stranded in a junk yard, all of this might become necessary... do you think "Corinthian" leather would work??? :lol: )
    So.....
    What do you call a cow with no feet???




    "Ground Beef"

    :)
     
  2. k1rod

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    Now why does this conjure up images of Ricardo Montalban carving up the seats of a Chrysler Cordoba? :mrgreen:
     
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  3. fyldefox

    fyldefox R.I.P.

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    I suppose that looked after correctly brass stoves generally have an incredibly long lifespan, and it's amazing what you can do with a lathe, apparently.
     
  4. shagratork

    shagratork United Kingdom Moderator, R.I.P. Subscriber

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    I'm a bit late joining this thread.

    I have been using '3-in-1' oil for about 40 years.
    The pump leathers on the stoves from 40 years ago which I bought new still function perfectly.
    On stoves I have purchased second (or tenth) hand over the intervening years and have replaced the pump leathers, all still work perfectly after being soaked in the oil.

    3-in-one.jpg
     
  5. spudz

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    Ditto the 3-in-1, although in my case it is an Italian equivalent machine oil.
    I do still have a few of Sefa's pump buckets soaking in a jar of olive oil for almost 2 years now, just to see what happens. ... taste lovely they do ! :lol: :lol: :lol: ;) ;) ;)

    John
     
  6. fyldefox

    fyldefox R.I.P.

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    I use 3 in 1 as well, and in fact storing your leathers in it, in pots, means that they are well soaked, and always ready for use :D/
     
  7. redspeedster

    redspeedster United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hi
    IMHO oil on a pump leather is like sex or pizza, any is better than none. :)
     
  8. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Hi Matukat, A Neat is an Ox. a bovine, a cow! Neatsfoot oil is made from oil extracted from the feet of cows, it is not only a wonderful lubricant and water-proofer of leather but, when used in a cow, has anti-freeze properties.
    I use Neatsfoot Oil compound for all my leather pump-washers.

    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
  9. lanevitt

    lanevitt Subscriber

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    We used to use Neatsfoot oil on the combat high boots, they came out to replace to very old design DMS boots. ( the only posative thing to come out of the Falklands war) it would soften thick leather beautifully.

    As far as any Pizza is better than no pizza, I have to disagree on that, i can still taste my last Asda pizza :-&

    Andrew.
     
  10. Wim

    Wim Subscriber

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    On another forum where I am a member, there has been a lenghty discussion re the use of neatsfoot oil. It seems the pure oil is OK, but when used in a compound (with whatever it is mixed with, I dunno) it seems to destroy the thread used to make horse harnesses and other leather equipment made with "natural" (cotton?) thread. It does not affect synthetic thread and ofcourse our pump cups are pure leather, so no problem there! Just wanted to let you know.

    Regards,

    Wim
     
  11. lanevitt

    lanevitt Subscriber

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    I recall someone saying the same thing about the old dubbin, used on football boots.. okay on leather but rots out the stitching. :-k
     
  12. Henry

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    I seem to remember it comes from calves :?:
    I'm sure I've heard it called calves foot oil :-k

    I always use engine oil, never have any trouble. As Gazza says anything is better than nothing.
    Especially where sex and pizza are concerned ;)
     
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  13. Stonehopper

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    Neat, as mentioned, is an old word for cattle.
    The oil is derived from the shins and feet of Calves, but not the hooves.

    The 'compounds' may possibly contain spirit which is apt to rot stitching.

    Derek
     
  14. flivver

    flivver United States Subscriber

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    Hi All; Interesting discussion. Like Sefa I use motor oil and have ever since a campout as a teenager when necessity intervened. I have tried many different lubricants with mixed results including corrosion and buildup in pump shaft. No such problem with motor oil. I store stoves and lanterns in a non air conditioned garage in a area where summer temps often reach 125F in the outside shade and much more in my garage. I never have a pump leather fail or dry out that has been treated with motor oil regardless of how many years ago. I also used motor oil when I lived in an area where temps often dipped well below 0-F. Also motor oil is not hard to find. Mike...

    P.S. Neatsfoot oil is great for leather but causes brass pump tubes to corrode. REMEMBER that you are lubricating two very different surfaces at the sane time and the lube has to function well with both.
     
  15. brassnipplekey

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    Thats interesting information .

    I'm a 3 in 1 man meself .
    Have used vegetable oil in the past ... Don't do it .. It gells & sticks .

    Nick
     
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  16. Henry

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    Not on chips it doesn't ;)
     
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  17. anlrolfe

    anlrolfe Subscriber

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    I use MINERAL oil (aka baby laxative)

    For people that work in food services this may be familiar for sharpening knives and oiling cutting boards.

    It is the main ingredient in the candy Swedish Fish.

    It is not toxic that I know of. Does not gel or varnish over time like other oils. It will not turn rancid like veg oil. On cutting boards, it will not support bacteria growth. Toxicity and residue taste of petrol oils for kitchen knife sharpening can be eliminated by using mineral oil on cutting stones.

    Please let me know if you find anything contrary about toxicity.

    AR
     
  18. Spiritburner

    Spiritburner Admin SotM Winner Subscriber

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    AR - Can that oil be used for seasoning cast iron?
     
  19. flivver

    flivver United States Subscriber

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    Ross: I have found bacon grease to be idea for cast iron. I was tipped off by a hundred and one year old lady chef about 35 yrs ago, and I agree with her wholeheartedly. It permeates the metal and resists water and stays lubed even after long periods. Also it is a food product. Mike...
     
  20. Knight84

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    I totally agree with Mike about bacon grease. It is also a tasty way to season the fry pan. The doctor won't like it one bit but what does he know.

    I have used mineral oil one some stoves and it works great. I have never heard anything about it being toxic.

    Jeff