Gustav Barthel, Juwel 34, ~1980's, grey-black paint scheme

Discussion in 'Juwel No:34' started by SMolson, Aug 13, 2014.

  1. SMolson

    SMolson Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2009
    Messages:
    1,048
    A Juwel 34, early 1980's, in black/grey paint scheme. This one came to me as a gift from a friend in Germany. Was used by her father on his holidays and trips on the Elbe River. It was very lightly used when I received it, in good condition.

    Came with spare parts tin, regulator key/multitool, funnel and case/pot support with strap.

    1407899109-IMG_7253_Juwel_34_opt.jpg

    Like many other such models, everything packs away in its own cylindrical draughtshield. Shown with everything unpacked. No stamping on brass burner plate.
    1407899118-IMG_7249_Juwel_34_opt.jpg

    Fuel control stems comes off the fuel tube at a squared angle.
    1407899136-IMG_7254_Juwel_34_opt.jpg

    Hexa-sided jet
    1407899144-IMG_7255_Juwel_34_opt.jpg

    Fount stamping includes JUWEL 34
    1407899153-IMG_7259_Juwel_34_opt.jpg

    Nur für Benzin d'essence for benzine (gasoline). Brass fuel cap stamped with G/B logo.
    1407899162-IMG_7260_Juwel_34_opt.jpg

    G/B logo Gustav Barthel Dresden and a triangle with 2 horizontal parallel lines.
    1407899169-IMG_7261_Juwel_34_opt.jpg

    Bottom of fount nests inside bottom cap when packed, rests on ground when deployed for use.
    1407899348-IMG_7278_Juwel_34_opt.jpg

    No stamping on underside of fount.
    1407899217-IMG_7282_Juwel_34_opt.jpg

    The spindle/multi-tool is used to loosen and tighten the heavy, solid brass fuel cap and to access the SRV. Hole in the handle part will not fit this one's jet. O-ring in fuel cap makes solid seal to fount when tightened.
    1407899227-IMG_7283_Juwel_34_opt.jpg

    BARTHEL-labelled spare parts tin contains/holds the key/multi-tool, foldable pricker, 10 spare pricker needles/carriers (labelled 028), 1 SRV rubber washer, graphite washer (for regulator valve) and 1 jet.
    1407899272-IMG_7265_Juwel_34_opt.jpg

    Foldable pricker showing removable/replaceable needle end.
    1407899280-IMG_7288_Juwel_34_opt.jpg

    Draughtshield with 4 pot supports, each is rotated 180 for deployment, pushed into place.
    1407899298-IMG_7277_Juwel_34_opt.jpg

    Stove with nice long key/multitool firmly in position.
    1407899432-IMG_7268_Juwel_34_opt.jpg

    Stove nestled inside her draughtshield/pot support.
    1407899307-IMG_7271_Juwel_34_opt.jpg

    There is no heatshield for these, potential increased risk of overpressurization.
    1407899314-IMG_7270_Juwel_34_opt.jpg

    Both end caps in place, stove all packed up. Comes with cotton strap and metal fastenings to keep everything snugly in place.
    1407899359-IMG_7247_Juwel_34_opt.jpg

    Top cap stamped Nur für Benzin Juwel 34 Gustav Barthel Dresden

    1407899367-IMG_7246_Juwel_34_opt.jpg

    This stove didn't need anything replaced or fixed, she was good to go.

    Primed with methyl hydrate
    1407899376-IMG_2631_Juwel_34_opt.jpg

    Running at near full power
    1407899385-IMG_2668_Juwel_34_opt.jpg

    Great little stove, well designed, good pot support for stove size, she thrums along sounding like a Svea 123 (not as loud though), good fuel control, nice long key doesn't have to be removed during operation (e.g. doesn't get too hot), solid steel case, nice parts kit, easy to pack up, etc. The only negatives, imo, is the lack of a heat shield, steel fount (rust risk) and the design of the fuel cap (necessitating the use of the key to tighten/loosen). Thumbs up and looking forward to using her on the next camping trip.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2015
  2. DAVE GIBSON

    DAVE GIBSON Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2004
    Messages:
    4,265
    very good photos.i have seen these before of course but got the impression they were a cheaper take off on the 123 but from your detailed shots i can see it's a real solid stove.
    the question is given a choice which would you take on a longer trip where failure would be a major hassle.
     
  3. geneislucky

    geneislucky Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2013
    Messages:
    334
    A very nice gift you received, Steve. Nice looking stove. As always, a wonderful presentation. Thanks.
     
  4. OMC

    OMC United States Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2013
    Messages:
    4,298
    Location:
    ILLINOIS, USA
    SMolson thx for yet another excellent post.
    Hey Dave 'n all,
    Gustav would be happy to hear his is not just a cheaper SVEA 123 type. SMolson questioning Gustov's german engineering as overheating concern? Are the tanks w/heat shields usually brass I wonder? They would conduct that radiant heat moreso than the steel tank (stronger too). Painted steel...and that's some good paint aye? The SVEA's tank warms w/our hands, No 34 instructions are in German SO i'm wondering does that steel tank warm by hand in instructions? I kinda doubt it and if so it exemplifies a difference there as well.
    Jet size is only 1 factor of flame but IIRC SVEA is .23? and looks like No 34 is .28?
    Re wondering which stove one might prefer maybe simmer ability is different? Fuel capacity? 34 size vs SVEA? The 34 likely a lot heavier but being they're both pocket stoves, who cares?.
    Artic member-mg3442 compared the 2 at full roar here
    https://classiccampstoves.com/threads/26883
    I sure like his posts too btw, haven't heard much of late.
    We may think a No34 w/bigger jet (if I got that right) would be hotter but that's not what he found w/his sampling.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2015
  5. Dutch_Peter

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2012
    Messages:
    368
    Hi SMolson,

    Nice :thumbup: 8)
    One advantage of the Juwel over the Svea imho is that the Juwel does not have a wick, so it will save you any 'wick problems' that you could have encountered with a Svea, like running the stove empty and scarring the wick.
    A disadvantage imho is the steel on the Juwel. It will rust and needs repainting, as your stove seems to have undergone ...

    Peter
     
  6. Admin

    Admin Courtesy of Iani

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2008
    Messages:
    1,350
    Peter

    I don't know where you get your information from, Juwels do have wicks
     
  7. Dutch_Peter

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2012
    Messages:
    368
    Hi Iani,
    Whoops sorry my mistake. I stand corrected ..
    Peter
     
  8. SMolson

    SMolson Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2009
    Messages:
    1,048
    Hi Peter,

    Maybe your Juwel 34 (assuming you have one?) had its wick removed for whatever reason? They've been around since the early 1940's I believe, a nice long run.

    Hi OMC. Perhaps you are correct about the German engineers figuring they didn't need a heat shield, I have no idea. Some of these models came in brass, including the 33's, or nickel plated and likewise had no heat shield. The Primus 70/71's, Radius 42's, Optimus 80', etc had tin heat shields in their little squared or shapely cases. I haven't looked at any of the 34's instructions, but cupping your hands around the Juwel's steel tank with the regulator open did flush some fuel out of the jet. So that method will work if you wanted to prime with coleman fuel from the fount. I haven't run any controlled timed tests or quantitative competitions on any of my similar-modeled stoves. Lots of factors to consider and it would take a lot of time. You'd have to run the same test multiple times on different models of the same stove to get a good average, then do the same with other models. You'd also need the proper equipment to do the measuring in certain tests. Design a testing matrix, assign weights to each attribute or evaluation, run them through it and compare the results. Winner gets bragging rights.

    Hi Dave - On the next trip out I'll bring this one as a replacement for the Primus 71. I like the 4 pot supports versus 3 of the Svea 123, but either way it's still going to be tippy with anything but the smallest pots. Designed for the solo traveller or in a support role for tandem+ groups. On our overnight trips these smaller compact stoves are great and fill the role of quickly boiling up ~1/2 liter of water for tea, coffee, noodles, washing, hot chocolate, yeast water, soup, gravy, sauces, instant oatmeal, couscous, rehydrating vegies/fruits, etc. The larger stoves with more fuel capacity and wider, beefier pot supports are used for longer-duration cooking and larger pots/pans requirements.
     
  9. idahostoveguy

    idahostoveguy R.I.P.

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2009
    Messages:
    3,374
    Nice Juwel. Great flames coming from that one.

    I seriously like the grey color.



    sam
     
  10. Admin

    Admin Courtesy of Iani

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2008
    Messages:
    1,350
    S Molson said :

    "Some of these models came in brass, including the 33's, or nickel plated and likewise had no heat shield."

    What evidence do you base your claim that they were nickel plated ?

    I have got a chrome plated 34, which the previous owner had plated.

    Early Juwel 34's came in 2 colours non-metallic, blue and green, the green being the least common.

    Sometime in the early 60's, smooth and hammered silver was used. There is also a green hammered paint in various shades.
     
  11. OMC

    OMC United States Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2013
    Messages:
    4,298
    Location:
    ILLINOIS, USA
    Hi Iani,
    SM in answering me has excellent input to the substance of the question don't you think? Re the nickel or not, you have extensive jewel 33 /34 knowledge and as far as you know there were none done in nickel, ok. Gustov's silver is easy to mistake for nickel at a glance / in a pic and I'd say again, that's some good paint.
    I want to THANK YOU as I recognize you've contributed mightily to CCS content including Jewel 33 / 34's. I AM still thinking Gustov got it right w/his design BUT I was wrong w/my details. SM, quite nicely, enlightened me re Gustov's brass stoves etc, i stand corrected in that aspect.

    You know your 33 / 34's, do you think it's not there in 40 yr run cuz a heat shield is not needed on 33/ 34? (thicker tanks? I do not know).

    SM thx again for addl info and thank you both for your contributions.
     
  12. SMolson

    SMolson Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2009
    Messages:
    1,048
    Hi Ian,

    That plated 34 may be the one I was referring to, came up very late 2012 or early 2013 via ebay. I saw it listed, was plated (I assumed it was nickeled), certainly not painted steel.

    1408291274-Plated_34_opt.jpg

    So the owner of yours plated it himself?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2015
  13. Admin

    Admin Courtesy of Iani

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2008
    Messages:
    1,350
    He only said he had it chrome-plated, appears to be the same image.

    I think your stove with the triangle and the two bars is an earlier one.

    I have got paperwork that dates the triangle to as early as 1966.

    The particular model that I have got with the triangle, has some form of filter plug, that goes into the underside of the jet.

    The paperwork itself is dated 1966, although it has been over-stamped, suggesting that the filter was introduced sometime during 1966.
    I also have paperwork that shows the same plug, being around in 1967 - the filter works well, I have not come across it after 1967.

    OMC
    There is a stove in the Russian section, that has a true heat shield which may be of interest.
    As for 33/34's time has proven that they have never needed one.
    As I said before, elsewhere, that so called heat-shield on the Svea 123 is a tool tidy/strengthener, without it the central tube would just collapse.
    An elephant could stand on a 33/34, whereas they couldn't do that with a 123.
     
  14. SMolson

    SMolson Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2009
    Messages:
    1,048
    Thanks Ian for the information. The daughter didn't know the date he had acquired it. Thought it was one of his later acquisitions (~1980) and comparing it to those currently in the Gallery it appeared to be most similar to those in from the early 80's. Is the paperwork you have referencing the triangle posted in the Library? I'll remove the jet this week and check it to see if there is the same filter (fine brass mesh?) plug. I don't have another 34 to check it against, she's the only one. The reference material in the Library is somewhat lacking for these models given their impressive production date range.

    I'm very cautious of the overheating issue regarding these types of coleman-fuel powered stoves. The distance is very short between burner bell (combustion area) and fount. In conjunction with a small and easily/quickly heated fount it creates a risky combination, even those with steel founts. Throw a pot over top of that and there's even more heat/less ventilation in the case area. I've seen at least a dozen Svea 123's with bloated tanks for sale on ebay, Radius 42's (including one of mine ) and a few Phoebus 725's with steel tanks, including one of mine (not posted yet). Phoebus 725's have a woefully poor and flimsy heatshield imo. The other types (Radius 42, Primus 71, Optimus 80's, etc) all have duo purpose heat shields/case supports as do many other different camping models running coleman fuel/MF: Optimus 111B,, Hikers; Radius 43B's; Enders 906X, Campus 5 (using their case frame), etc I don't see the same frequency of bloated or damaged tanks in kerosene (regulated) stoves due to overpressurization (albeit most of these are larger and not so squat), even the standard Kerosene versions of the camping models already mentioned.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2015
  15. Admin

    Admin Courtesy of Iani

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2008
    Messages:
    1,350
    No, the paperwork is not in the gallery.

    Not all Juwel 34's with the triangle had the filter in it.

    I'll be sending you a PT

    The distance/overheating issue should be no problem, it is to do with the servicing of the tank.

    Steel or Brass tanks suffer ballooning, if not looked after.
     
  16. SMolson

    SMolson Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2009
    Messages:
    1,048
    Thanks Ian,

    Pictures of the 34's jet, no brass filter in mine.

    1408929997-IMG_7858_Juwel_34_opt.jpg

    1408929992-IMG_7854_Juwel_34_opt.jpg

    Both the original (used) and the spare (below) marked with 3 and 33.
    1408930003-IMG_7851_Juwel_34_opt.jpg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2015
  17. SMolson

    SMolson Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2009
    Messages:
    1,048
    Update on the manufacture year of this Juwel 34: between 1973-79.

    According to the ' GDR Product Quality and Labelling Marks ' PDF document:

    "1973 change in delta with lettering ASMW, reduced representation without lettering only with top and bottom line" To view it in English, use the 'Translate to English' option from within your browser (I use Google Chrome).

    According to Juwel 34 instruction manual in 1979+, the Juwel 34's had a different style of fuel tank (no seam lower base), and mine has the seam.

    So safe guess is 1976, +/- 3 years.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 1, 2015