Help identify this stove please

Discussion in 'Stove Forum' started by Moo, Jan 24, 2021.

  1. Moo United States

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    Hi all I’m new here. I was at my local scrap yard the other and came across this stove. At least I think it’s a stove.
    I seems very weird, I have no idea how the burner would work, where you fill it from (take the pump out?), or who makes it.
    I’ve been searching online for a while and haven’t seen anything even remotely similar to it. Any info would be appreciated.

    33660E9F-7240-4918-99D6-162CB73A71B1.jpeg 4EBAB1A2-D415-4499-B01E-BC6BC484F8B0.jpeg 8B0B2E8C-780E-4844-94C0-F46960B3D884.jpeg 8AFC4F5F-E9EF-4806-AF30-1A6B3BD1E15F.jpeg DEFF5746-3631-423C-885C-4A980373476D.jpeg 1C51C552-46D9-4E1C-B8F1-52FE15F55BFB.jpeg 29443E94-2C63-406E-AD55-AC50B4B500DE.jpeg A3EEDEDC-A639-4345-884B-12E3D288BBD6.jpeg 80504B46-2D82-486D-B2D1-9EE8471FFEAC.jpeg 88766779-4415-403E-8369-5011F94B928C.jpeg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 24, 2021
  2. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    I'd say it's a furnace; i.e. a lead melter and the like. Those with knowledge will be along soon.

    Welcome to CCS.
     
  3. Majicwrench

    Majicwrench Subscriber

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    Yup, some sort of lead furnace. Quite a few of them around. Bet they are a hoot lit!!
     
  4. cottage hill bill

    cottage hill bill Subscriber

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    It is a plumber's furnace. Before pvc became the standard for plumbing (1960s) cast iron pipe was used. To seal the joints in the pipe the joints were packed with oakum. Oakum is hemp fiber, often untwisted rope, either greased or tarred. Oakum was driven into the joint with a set of specially shaped tools (I still have a set) then molten lead was poured over the oakum to lock it in place. Some furnaces, yours seems to have this feature, allowed the handle to lock at 90 degrees so you can rest a soldering iron on it for heating.

    Unless you are heating a large pot to boil these are pretty much useless as a stove because they just put out too much heat. I don't recognize the brand of yours, but it looks like a nice example. A big plus is it has the windscreen, the sheet metal bowl at the top. those often go missing and are impossible to find by themselves. The coil in the middle is essentially a giant generator. There is an orifice at the center bottom. There may be a preheat cup at the bottom. The usual drill for lighting is to give it a few (5-10) pumps, crack the valve and let some fuel drip into the preheat cup. Close valve and light preheat cup. Pump the tank up some more. When the preheat cup has burned nearly out crack the valve then gradually open the valve more as the furnace heats up and can handle the increase in fuel.

    Do this out side until you learn how to control the beast. If the generator is not up to heat when you open the valve it can shoot a stream of flaming fuel 3-4 feet straight up. If there is a crucible in the furnace when you do this the stream is deflected back down into the coil and you end up with burning fuel being splashed down over the tank, out the sides in all directions and more excitement than you probably want.

    I think the grey oval on the side of the tank is where the badge was. If you search the net for plumber's furnace you may be able to identify the brand by the fuel control knob. Accessories for your pot would be a pot and a ladle like these.
    pot and ladles.jpg
     
  5. lant-ern

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    It looks like it a Clayton & Lambert lead furnace .

    Ernie
     
  6. Moo United States

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    Thank you all for your input. Now that I know what I’m looking at, I actually believe, based on internet pics, that it’s a Dunlop lead furnace.
    Thanks all, I never would have figured that out without the help.
    Now I should go find some soldier molds...