Home made regulator burner

Discussion in 'Fettling Forum' started by Twoberth, Feb 15, 2020.

  1. Twoberth

    Twoberth United Kingdom Subscriber

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    After reading all the responses to this question, I was convinced of the benefits and I decided to make my own.

    Instead of a design with a pointed spindle I decided to make one like a ball valve, but with a hole in a rotating bar rather than a ball. I chose a burner with a lot of thread below the hex nut, as I needed to beef up the nut to provide a platform for the regulator housing.

    First job was to clean out the inside of the base of the burner so it would accept the steel insert and be clean enough to 'take ' the braze. I achieved this by drilling a slightly larger hole out with a 10mm drill.

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    Then I beefed up the nut by brazing on another cut down nut

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    The insert was cut from 10mm bar, with a 3.2 mm hole in it.

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    and brazed into place.

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    Then a 4mm hole was drilled horizontally through the reinforced nut, and an M6 bolt turned down in the lathe to be a tight fit in this horizontal hole. (You don't need a lathe - you could just braze on 4mm stud on the end of the M6 bolt. This was how I later did the long spindle control shaft).

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    Next job was to drill the 'valve' hole in the end of the spindle using a 2mm drill.

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    If all works according to plan, the burner would be 'off' with the spindle hole horizontal, and 'on' with the spindle hole vertical. A quarter turn total control!

    Next job was to finish the spindle and to build the housing. The spindle was finished by cutting of the bolt leaving four complete threads, and brazing on a long 4mm control shaft using Silverflo 20.

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    The housing was made from three different diameter brass and copper tubes brazed together with a M6 nut brazed in the fat end, and a M8 thread formed in the other end. The tubes and nut were brazed with high temperature Silverflo 20 filler, and after threading the spindle into the housing and fitting it all into the burner, the housing was brazed into place using the lower temperature Silverflo 55 so that the previous braze joints didn't remelt.

    The spindle was only threaded in place temporarily to correctly align the housing around the hole in the burner nut, so before the final braze the spindle end and the threads in the nut and on the spindle were coated with permanent marker ink so that the braze didn't stick to them, and I could remove the spindle afterwards.

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    Next the spindle bits were assembled to fit together. Two washers each end of a roll of graphite sheet and a short M8 bolt with a 4mm hole through it.

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    All fitted into place and tightened up.

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    The stove works OK, and simmers (sort of). There is not much control (1/4 turn max), so it is a delicate balance between low simmer and out!

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    It works well enough for me to appreciate some of the features and benefits of a regulated burner. Best feature is being able to simmer and then go back to full power without pumping.

    In case you are wondering about the 'engine room'. It is an old trusted Monitor that I use for testing burners, and for heating my Kubex oven. I cut the legs off so it fits under a variety of pot stands,

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    but kept the legs for when it is on coffee duty.

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    I know, I should get out more.
     
  2. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner SotY Winner Subscriber

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  3. Twoberth

    Twoberth United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Having made the regulated burner (which I enjoyed and learned a lot), tested it and thought about it, I am still not totally convinced that (for me anyway) it is necessary on a single burner for camping/outdoor use. Certainly, if you buy one and it cannot simmer it is not much use.

    As I said earlier, the best feature (IMHO) is the ability to simmer and go back to full power without having to pump and possibly spill the food in the process. But having said that I don't cook many camp meals that require simmering and then going back to full power with the same pot on.
     
  4. phaedrus42

    phaedrus42 Subscriber

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    An impressive and ingenious piece of engineering! Perhaps you could improve the simmering adjustment by filing a groove into the edge of the hole in the spindle. That should broaden the range of simmer adjustment.

    Come to think about it, a groove around the spindle instead of the hole may also give a more linear adjustment...
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2020
  5. Twoberth

    Twoberth United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Good idea, @phaedrus42 , I have about 4 thread widths (0.4cms) to move the groove across the width of the main fuel supply hole. My only concern is causing a leak by compressing/relaxing the graphite packing as I thread the spindle in and out.
     
  6. phaedrus42

    phaedrus42 Subscriber

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    I see what you mean yes. Coleman lanterns work that way though. They have a ferrule/ring/retaining wire circlip arrangement on the two sides of the packing, so that if you open the valve all the way it compresses the packing and makes it seal better. For the rest of the spindle travel the packing is not under compression.
     
  7. Afterburner

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    Nice work & interesting test version of a DIY regulated burner! :thumbup::clap:
     
  8. Simes

    Simes Subscriber

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    @Twoberth I'm not sure if this repeats previous suggestions, but have had a thought about 'cam' profiling that won't go away.

    With a circular hole your cutoff at the end of the travel is pretty quick, the hole needs to be elongated so cutoff (throttling) is more progressive.
     
  9. Twoberth

    Twoberth United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Good idea @Simes
    The subject of simmer control is topical here at the moment with several good ideas.

    I was going to try a looser fitting spindle so that there is a permanent gas leak around it even when ‘off’. So the quarter turn control would be full to simmer, and to actually turn off you would need to use the air screw. However this would negate one of the benefits.

    Yours is a better idea and I will try it first. Thanks.