Homemade regulator roarer burner

Discussion in 'Fettling Forum' started by Twoberth, Apr 15, 2021.

  1. Twoberth

    Twoberth United Kingdom Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2017
    Messages:
    1,123
    Location:
    England
    This is not really a fettle, I just wanted to see if I could make a roarer burner with regulator from scratch. This is what I did.

    Dome a circular piece of brass (with towing hitch ball or similar) to make the bottom of the vaporiser .

    2021-03-20 001 003.JPG

    Prepare top and bottom vaporiser pieces for brazing.

    2021-03-20 001 004.JPG

    2021-03-20 001 005.JPG

    Braze with silver braze and clean up.

    2021-03-20 001 006.JPG

    2021-03-20 001 012.JPG

    I keep old 'base nuts' from knackered burners. When cleaned up with a cap soldered on they make great travel caps.

    2021-04-15 002 003.JPG

    2021-04-15 002 002.JPG



    This time I incorporated one into this burner.

    (I used copper plumbing tubing instead of brass as it's what I had available.)

    Make the two inlet tubes with the correct length and shape, and braze them to the 'base nut' at the correct angle so that the other ends mate with the underside of the vaporiser. Then drill two holes in the underside of the vaporiser for the inlet tubes, and a align the free ends of the inlet tubes (suitably angled) over the holes in the vaporiser and braze.

    2021-04-09 001 001.JPG

    2021-04-09 001 003.JPG

    2021-04-09 001 005.JPG

    Then fit the regulator barrel (shown in the post here) to cradle between the inlet tubes and measure and make the outlet tubes to fit the barrel and underside of the vaporiser. Then drill the holes for the outlet tubes in the vaporiser, and fit and braze the tubes to the regulator and vaporiser simultaneously. Then braze the lugs on to the inlet tubes to hold the flame ring.

    2021-04-10 001 003.JPG

    2021-04-10 001 001.JPG

    2021-04-10 001 002.JPG

    Here it is fitted to the SVEA tank

    2021-04-10 001 004.JPG

    2021-04-10 001 005.JPG

    Flame distribution is even around the domed vaporiser.

    2021-04-15 001 006.JPG

    and flame with the flame ring fitted

    2021-04-15 001 012.JPG

    and regulated back to a 'pilot' flame.

    2021-04-15 001 018.JPG

    The key to successful brazing (IMHO) is in the preparation. I am in no way an expert, but I have found that if I make sure that the tubes ends are contoured correctly and that the mating surfaces are clean and fit together as perfectly as possible, then the actual brazing is relatively easy.

    Have fun!
     
  2. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2004
    Messages:
    11,308
    Location:
    Tacoma, Washinghton, USA
    I beg to differ!
     
  3. ajvuik

    ajvuik Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2007
    Messages:
    640
    Location:
    Netherlands
    That is one cool project! Nicely done ✅
     
  4. Big Si

    Big Si Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2008
    Messages:
    1,020
    Well done, interesting project.

    Si
     
  5. Twoberth

    Twoberth United Kingdom Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2017
    Messages:
    1,123
    Location:
    England
    Thanks.
     
  6. Lance

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2004
    Messages:
    5,444
    Location:
    Northwestern Illinois
    Twoberth; you are correct, proper preparation of the parts makes a sil-braze job much easier.

    Clean is the magic word when it comes to soldering or sil-brazing. I always start with cleaning all the parts I'm going to join then I head out and clean my hands and the tools I'll be using. Even the least bit of oil or dirt can ruin a solder joint.

    I've seen shipyard workers try unsuccessfully to sil-braze pipe for three hours that I was able to join in ten minutes, all because he didn't clean the inside of the elbow he needed to finish the project.

    When i taught sil-brazing at the service school I attended (even though i was a student) (more on that another time) I made all the other students go out and wash their hands after they had prepped the material. The senior instructor said that wasn't necessary but I insisted they do it. Since the instructor had said it wasn't necessary two of the students did not wash their hands, came back to the classroom and attempted to join the sections of pipe. Each of them had handled the ends to be joined and thus their pipes failed a pressure test. I knew it was going to happen and told them exactly why they failed. The following class, a week behind mine, the senior instructor sent the students out and had them wash their hands and dry them good too. Even a drop of water can ruin a solder or sil-braze job.

    Lance