How to make an Optimus 111 replacement cookie cutter

Discussion in 'Fettlers Master Class' started by Twoberth, Oct 11, 2019.

  1. Twoberth

    Twoberth United Kingdom Subscriber

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    I am just fettling one of the earlier models of an eleventy one, and the ‘cookie cutter’ is missing from the shaft.

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    I decided to cast a new one using liquid cold enamel (coloured epoxy resin). I have another cookie cutter to use as a template, but what should I use for a mould material? I tried plaster of paris and delf clay (these absorb the liquid), latex, BlueTac and others - and then I found a simple cheap mould material using silicone caulk and liquid soap described here.

    Prepare enough silicon to make a good impression of the template cookie cutter. To help release the template after making the impression, spray the template with silicon spray (I used FabSil, for waterproofing tents) and dry with a hair dryer.

    Push the template firmly into the mould material using a jig to make sure the template remains vertical and is supported while the mould cures. Leave overnight and remove the template. (ignore the donut in the photos).

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    Mix enough resin and hardener to make the first cast of about 5 ccs to cover the base of the mould and cover all the raised lettering. Make sure the bottom of the inprinted mould is horizontal and that the shaft is secured vertically in the jig just above the lettering and make the first cast. Leave overnight.

    This first cast should give a good definition of the lettering, and secure the shaft in place.

    Then to reinforce the brittle enamel, scatter some suitable fibres into the mould making sure they don't touch the sides. I used copper wire strands from some electrical wire.

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    Then pour some more mixed resin onto the fibres/strands up to the desired thickness adding more fibres as you wish. Make sure these additional fibres do not touch the sides and are fully submerged.

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    Leave overnight again, before carefully demoulding the casting.

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    The mould can be re-used, although they are dirt cheap to remake.

    To highlight the lettering, I mixed red and black enamel until I matched the brown colour of the template cookie cutter, and then painted/smeared it into the indented lettering.

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    and left it overnight to cure before polishing the surface.
    This is the finished cutter

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    Yo can clearly use any colours you like. I also made the more common brown cookie cutter, and used typing correction fluid to contrast the lettering (a tip I got from this site).

    More pictures of the finished cutter. It looks suitably distressed and suitable for an old stove.

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    Here it is at home on the eleventy one, with replacement windshield, rag and a stainless simmer plate.

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    Lots of materials science under the surface here (pun intended). Mould curing reactions, epoxy technology, fibre re-enforced composites. However its all very simple to do in practice - have fun!
     
  2. Rangie

    Rangie Subscriber

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    Very nicely done! :thumbup:

    Alec.
     
  3. Simes

    Simes Subscriber

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    My you've been busy. :)
     
  4. Spiritburner

    Spiritburner Admin Subscriber

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    Very useful tutorial. :thumbup:
     
  5. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark Subscriber

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    Brilliant idea, and very well done!
     
  6. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    @Twoberth
    Useful source for the mold. Blu-Tac sort of works for smaller items, but the silicon stuff is obviously better.
     
  7. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

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  8. anlrolfe

    anlrolfe Subscriber

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    Is been a while since I've checked in. Fortuitous that I clicked on this link first.

    Salute !!! Job very well done.
     
  9. Big Si

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    A very nice job, well done. I've in the past used the same idea to make (re-cast) candles for my Erco candle lantern.

    Si