Intro, beginning Turm collector

Discussion in 'Stove Forum' started by Tall Paul, Oct 23, 2013.

  1. Tall Paul

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    Hello everyone. This is my first post to this forum, altho I have been lurking for about a year now. I have been making "beer bottle" alcohol stoves for a couple of years, by the dozens. They are great little alcohol stoves, but my main dissatisfaction lies in the fact that they can be easily tipped, and that the flame is uncontrollable. Adjustment is possible, but technically difficult to achieve. They run full out or not at all.

    When I first started looking over this site, I poured through the stove gallery for hours on end. I came to the conclusion that, based on style and utility, I favored the German stoves, im particular the Ernst Hahnel Vulcano, the Turm Touring, and the Turm Sport, book style. Not sure if there is a sub-model designation of that or not.

    It took me a while, but I recently purchased a Turm Sport as mentioned above. I'm in the process of restoring it, or Fettling as this site refers to it.

    I have been trying to find out more about the Turm manufacture, but have not been able to find out much. From what I gather, the last stoves were produced in the 1970's, but little documentaton seems to exist to support this. My stove, based on the brand new in the box one that Matoshi showed is a bit earlier. It has the yellow and blue paint, a fact not revealed until I was able to get the red paint off that someone bathed it in.

    I would love to talk shop with other Turm lovers.
     
  2. snwcmpr

    snwcmpr SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Welcome to CCS.
    I personally find a comparison of Turm to homemade a bit of a stretch. That said, the Turm is an awesome stove. And, so are homemade.
    For adjustable homemade stoves ... a ring can be added to limit the flame, that adjusts the flame. A ring can also be added to limit the air coming in.
    ...Link... to my 'kitten stove' with simmer ring. I personally prefer the chimney style flame to the blossom flame. A wide pot is required to make use of the wide flame pattern.
    Or ... I haven't seen a better homemade alcohol stove than this guy's ... Link

    Again, welcome,
    Ken in NC
     
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  3. Murph

    Murph United States Subscriber

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  4. cazna

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    Hi Tall Paul

    I too am a fan of turm stoves, I have two tourings and one sport old model and one sport new model like the touring, The touring has a brass tank and the sport has a steel tank.

    I also have a turm 38.

    Im not sure how many turm models were made.

    I love how they prime, Just let out a little meths, Light, And if its not primed enough just let a little more meths run out before the flame goes out until its going, Unlike an 8r or 123 or 71 etc, Its two fuels, One for the stove and one for priming, And if they don't prime first go then you need to wait till the flames gone, Add some more, relight and so on.

    I also love the trangias, But its surprising how much hotter vapourised meths burns compared to raw meths, But a trangia has other great features that turms do not as well.

    I also have an adler and an austrail 66 meths burning stoves similer to turms design.
     
  5. Tall Paul

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    Thanks for the warm welcomes. Snwcmpr, I am familiar with Tetkoba's work, he has been on my favorites list for a couple of years. I also enjoy the fundamental research of ESNISHI into the basics of pressurized alcohol burners as well as Norkis Sorrano's coil stoves. It's always interesting to see how the design boundries of alcohol burning stoves can be pushed.

    I am working on my own design of a pressurized stove and will eventually post pictures of it in the frankenstove section.
     
  6. Tall Paul

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    Cazna, I am not familiar with the adler and austrail 66 stoves. Are there photos of them in the stove reference section?
     
  7. cazna

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    Heres an Adler, But mine has a green base, Very small stove, Odd as in the on off is at the base of the tank so it has poor control, You turn it off and it has to burn all the fuel out of the tube before it will turn off.

    https://classiccampstoves.com/threads/13812

    I don't think I have posted the Austrail 66, That's quite a big cast iron single burner made in austrailia some time.
    Its this style, Big bigger and all cast iron.

    https://classiccampstoves.com/threads/
     
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  8. snwcmpr

    snwcmpr SotM Winner Subscriber

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    This thread has reminded me of how many stoves I have not posted pictures of in the gallery.
    The Turm is one of them.

    Ken in NC
     
  9. Tall Paul

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    Well, I managed to get 99.9% of the red paint off of the stove, revealing the original paint underneath. Acetone was used to remove the paint, as it appeared to be an acrylic-based paint, which proved correct.

    I managed to clean it up somewhat, using small rotary steel brushes in my flex-shaft tool. It burns, but with a soft blue to yellow flame. I suspect that there may be some debris built up on the jet, which I have yet to clean out. I ran alcohol through the stove before inserting the filter (which was in good shape), just to see if all the ports were clear. It flowed correctly, so I installed the filter and did a burn test.

    It has a little leakage problem in a few places, which I am working on correcting. I picked up a couple of rubber o-rings, one to install on the grey valve control knob, which is leaking when the stove is closed, and a smaller one to install on the outer end of the flame control shaft, as I do not like it when flame shoots out of it when the valve is running full open. Hopefully this will fix it.

    I still have to put a new gasket on the end of the generator tube where the screw is removed, and another on the tank fill cap. This should correct all of the leaking.

    Hopefully, the o-rings I purchased will not heat up and melt, sticking things together. I did not look to see their exact composition when I bought them, was in a bit of a hurry.

    I tested the stove with a large pot holding about 4 cups of water. I put about 4 ounces of alcohol in the tank before lighting it. The stove ran for over an hour and still had some fuel left, but only heated the water to steaming, which it maintained throughout the burn. The stove was sitting outside with a slight breeze blowing, not sure if this was a factor or not.

    I wish there was a way to remove the hinge pins, so that I could remove all the original paint and have it repainted properly. I haven't done the electrolite bath yet, just brushed the rust off of the pot stands. The burn tray has some rust spots, so it needs to be fully stripped, de-rusted and repainted.

    This is an interesting little stove, with a surprisingly heavy case. It was definately built to last.