Is a trivet necessary?

Discussion in 'Stove Forum' started by Greeley, Apr 19, 2021.

  1. Greeley

    Greeley United States Subscriber

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    A neophyte's question, I guess, but is a trivet necessary on a Primus-type stove, or are the three tripod "legs" sufficient for holding a pot above the burner? Does the trivet make it any more efficient?

    Tom
     
  2. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    The trivet is not necessary, though it is useful for larger pans on the larger stoves as an added measure of stability. Typically the one-pint and smaller hiking stoves don't have them at all.
     
  3. David Shouksmith

    David Shouksmith Subscriber

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    Not necessary but useful because they distribute the heat from the stove more evenly over the base of the kettle or pan or whatever. My suspicion would be that if they were useless then stove manufacturers would have ceased supplying them to save money...
     
  4. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner SotY Winner Subscriber

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    The dome of an outer cap on a silent burner sometimes requires the extra clearance.
     
  5. geeves

    geeves New Zealand Subscriber

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    Some work as a wind break although that doesnt seem to be the main design. Really they are just for looks and to give the pot a more stable base
     
  6. Jaime Massang

    Jaime Massang Australia Subscriber

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    I beg to differ from some of the opinions expressed. I think a trivet is essential from a safety point especially for the smaller demountable traveler tripod stoves.
    The unsupported 120 degree space between any two of the three legs can allow a cooking utensil to pivot on any two legs notwithstanding how centered a pot is.This can be dangerous especially where the diameter of a pot base is large relative to the tripod configuration (or where a 'heavy' fry pan handle is inadvertently positioned in the unsupported region).
    I have a small Hipolito No. 0 which is a traveling model (and a mighty stove for other reasons) with removable legs. It has a pressed metal trivet which actually positively engages the leg crooks and sort of locks them in position. I believe a trivet also distributes the heat more evenly in the case of a roarer. Regards, Jaime.
     
  7. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    If by "smaller demountable traveler tripod stoves" (a mouthfull, that...) is meant one-pint classic hiking stoves such as the Primus 210, the Optimus 00, the Burmos 21, the Svea 121, and yes, the Hipolito 0, and many others: a trivet is totally uneccesary, uneeded, and inessential. Which is why none of them came with one (other than the cute little one with the Hipo 0). Likewise with the various 96s and others of the half-pint class.

    Your Hipolito 0 you describe as a 'traveling model'. Is there one such that would be a 'non-traveling' model?
     
  8. hikerduane

    hikerduane Subscriber

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    I won a Valor trivet today to go with my 55. Shipping was crazy via RM. Trivet was 3GBP. I can see at times that a small pot is better situated with a trivet, otherwise it is a balancing act for me on some stoves when using my small coffee percolator.
    Duane
     
  9. Jaime Massang

    Jaime Massang Australia Subscriber

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    In Australia, in less fortunate times, a lot of tripod stoves were actually used as the main home cooking facility. By 'smaller demountable traveler tripod stoves' I was referring to those which came in tins especially of a smaller size; could be dissembled (hence 'demountable'), and taken on travels (hence 'traveling')."Hiking" is good term but I used 'traveling' in general to describe also bicycle, motorcycle and car transportability (I wasn't thinking so much of Shank's Pony).
    "A trivet is totally uneccesary, uneeded, and inessential" is a valid opinion until a pot and its piping hot contents tips over and burns someone i.e could have been avoided by a trivet bridging the gap between the upright stove supports.
    I didn't know Hipolito were the only ones to supply trivets on "one-pint classic hiking stoves". It shows there must have been a good reason to go to the extra manufacturing expense. Or it shows how advanced they were.
    Technically, two pint stoves are also transportable but I think most would understand why stove makers came out with 'demountable' one pinters i.e they are designed to be compact, disassembled and can be packed away for travel purposes, hence 'traveling model'.
    Anyway I am about to throw the three burner Weber in the boot and make that a 'traveling model' also.
     
  10. Jaime Massang

    Jaime Massang Australia Subscriber

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  11. Jaime Massang

    Jaime Massang Australia Subscriber

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  12. ArchMc

    ArchMc Subscriber

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    I bought an Optimus 00 new, directly from the US manufacturer rep (Optimus USA) in the early '80s. It did not come with a trivet, nor was a trivet offered as an option.

    ....Arch
     
  13. threedots New Zealand

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    I would say that a trivet is more necessary on a stove that is designed to have one.
    The clearance that is necessary from burner top to pot bottom allows for a more complete fuel combustion and is affected if the trivet is not present on these stoves. Pot to burner clearance can be a lot less causing incomplete fuel combustion which increases dangerous carbon monoxide fumes.
    Some stoves don't have much difference in this crucial height if the trivet is not present. Whether that is intentional or not in their design I do not know.
    John
     
  14. Jaime Massang

    Jaime Massang Australia Subscriber

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    You're probably right Arch.
    The traveling (or travelling) models came in compact tins or cases and existing trivets probably didn't fit.
    They were probably also omitted to save weight (e.g. for hiking purposes).
    More's the shame really and it makes me even prouder of my little Hipolito '0' with its little pressed tin trivet.
    In my opinion, it really does make the stove safer for the reasons already discussed.
    I actually make my own trivets from aluminium strip and round 6 inch air fryer cooling racks (aka cake rests in Australia).
    I've posted pictures before which included them. I found they also act as mini windshields at the flame ring or outer cap level.

    Jaime.
     
  15. Wim

    Wim Subscriber

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    Some of the larger 1&3/4 pint traveling/hiking/whatever your preference to call them stoves came with a trivet. As the box they came in is bigger, it is easier to include a trivet. Also, no matter how little, a trivet costs money to make (and,maybe, a slightly bigger container) so it might simply be a cost saving exercise to not include them. I like the little Hipolito one, makes it easier to use a small Bialetti or similar coffee maker.