Is MPL brand mineral turpentine good to burn?

Discussion in 'Stove Forum' started by Masjaf, Jan 12, 2020.

  1. Masjaf Spain

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2020
    Messages:
    4
    Location:
    Spain
    Hello,

    I am looking for some advice regarding the burning of MPL brand mineral turpentine here in Spain. The label says white spirit although it seems to contain smaller chain alkanes.

    I am using the Primus Omnifuel II. I have already been burning the fuel without too much soot for some time, but I had to use the warranty service to replace some parts after the stove started malfunctioning even with regular maintenance. I am concerned about health effects and if it perhaps damages the stove parts.

    I have attached the data sheet of the product (unfortunately it is in Spanish). It doesn't seem to contain any additives but I am unsure about the small part of aromatics it might contain.

    Here is also the product website:
    SIMIL TURPENTINE 1L – MPL

    Do you have any recommendations on what to burn here in Spain? I am in the Valencia region and have had little luck finding something like kerosene or naphtha. I have read that automotive gasoline isn't ideal for burning, but many people do burn it. I'm not sure if auto gasoline would be better or worse than aguarras simil. What do you think?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2004
    Messages:
    11,446
    Location:
    Far North of Scotland
    From this thread:

    International Fuel Names

    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
  3. Masjaf Spain

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2020
    Messages:
    4
    Location:
    Spain
    I have viewed that thread but as far as I know gasoline usually also contains aromatics and it might contain more than the mineral terpentine in question. I am just hoping someone might know more about this brand or have some suggestions on what to use in Spain.

    The stove malfunctioned and I am trying to find the culprit. It might have been poor quality because I bought it with a discount.

    It might have also been the fuel. In which case I need to find something else to burn.
     
  4. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2004
    Messages:
    16,999
    Morning, @Masjaf ,

    Welcome to CCS! I wonder if our very good friend, @pau-i-amor , could shed some light on your questions, as he, too, is from Spain. He's near Barcelona, and is a very good man, and a good friend! Good luck in finding the info you seek. As an aside, my wife and I got to spend a few weeks in Barcelona, last year, and we loved it!! So much to see, and so much wonderful food! My workable, but limited Spanish came in handy, and we found the people in that area to be very friendly and courteous!! We look forward to going back, someday! Take care, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc
     
  5. Simes

    Simes Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2004
    Messages:
    4,171
    Location:
    I'm on the way....
    Welcome to CCS @Masjaf.

    The technical info you have attached, from first view without translation would suggest it is a standard list of health impacts for petroleum products Hxxx etc.

    Don't drink, rub in your eyes and will kill you if not handled with a complete vapour sealed suit. But that's industry standard warning.

    The link reminded me I had responded having checked the long ECHA number on the bottle of white spirit I have for paint brush cleaning, there should be one on your label as you're still in the EU. It may help to identify what you have.

    An alternative in the UK for cheap kero is bbq lighting fluid from some outlets at the end of the summer. Again check the label as not all fluids are the same.

    I have to admit I've not tried the UK Turpentine substitute in a stove and have no direct experience to report.
     
  6. Afterburner

    Offline
    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2014
    Messages:
    1,978
    As @Doc Mark mentioned @pau-i-amor would be "the man" to help to find kerosene or stove grade white gas at Spain.

    Is this a Spanish outdoor shop: https://www.ferrehogar.es/epages/eb2406.sf/es_ES/?ObjectPath=/Shops/eb2406/Categories/GAS ? They seem to have kerosene for lanterns (same works fine for stoves also) and white gas from Coleman & Primus.

    At pharmacy they might have "cleaning benzine" that is actually pure Heptane and it works fine for stoves. Price might be (much) higher than industrial quality Heptane.

    Those stove and lantern kerosenes and white gases are best for stove use!

    Turpentine might contain quite much impurities since they are just for solvent use. Same with automobile (/engine) fuels, they always contain chemicals to protect the engine and to improve combustion in car engine. I would try to use of them.
     
  7. Marc

    Marc Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2015
    Messages:
    3,666
    Location:
    Oregon, USA
    If you have a hardware store or home improvement type store which carries gardening supplies, they may have something like Aspen or other alkylate small engine fuels. The four stroke version, without the oil, will work in place of gasoline.
     
  8. Masjaf Spain

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2020
    Messages:
    4
    Location:
    Spain
    Thanks for the suggestions, I'll try to check some more stores for the alkylate fuel and check that online store to see if I trust it.
     
  9. itchy

    Offline
    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2009
    Messages:
    3,120
    @Masjaf

    It looks like you have found a good and suitable substitute for Coleman fuel. It appears to be just Naphtha but is being marketed as a substitute for turpentine.

    Any petroleum product going to contain, in addition to the main component, a low level mixture of longer and shorter chain hydrocarbons as well as a few aromatics (like toluene or benzene) simply because the expense of further purification cannot be justified for solvents and fuels. I think the main thing to worry about would be possible additives, especially chlorinated compounds, and there does not appear to be any. But, as already stated, avoid direct contact like you would for most other petroleum fuels.

    Do you know what was causing problems with your stove?
     
  10. Masjaf Spain

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2020
    Messages:
    4
    Location:
    Spain
    In a few days I will receive replacement parts for the stove.

    I am thinking there was something wrong with the lindal valve or hose. It seemed like something clogged it which made the pressure fall, which in turn made the fuel burn slow and only then I started seeing a lot of soot on the spindle, where the fuel enters the vaporizer chamber. I cleaned the whole thing up so many times but I still could only use gas, which also wasn't working as well as it did when I got the stove. A few more cleaning rounds and then the stove didn't even function on gas.

    I ran the stove on the Aguarras simil at least 70 times with some regular cleaning of the jet and spindle before problems started appearing. After doing all the maintenance that Primus expedition service suggested and the stove still not working they decided to send me some replacement parts.

    I found Aguarras simil to be cheap and it seems additive free but I wasn't sure. Other than buying it online none of the local stores around here seem to sell something like kerosene. Decathlon didn't have any liquid fuel for stoves either.
     
  11. pau-i-amor

    pau-i-amor Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2012
    Messages:
    490
    Let me write in spanish. May be Masjaf would understand catalan language, since catalan is co-official language in Valencia region.

    Bienvenido al foro @Masjaf

    Existe una equivocación recurrente en cuanto a la denominación de ciertos combustibles. Intento explicarlo:

    White spirit es lo que se conoce como aguarrás, o sea, esencia natural de trementina, que se obtiene de la resina de los pinos.
    White gas es lo que se conoce como gasolina blanca, o sea gasolina no destinada a la automoción. Esencialmente es octano y heptano. Se utiliza en las casas para quitar ciertas manchas de la ropa.

    Como aguarrás hay dos tipos: El "puro", o sea el producto natural obtenido de la trementina que por su precio tiene un uso restringido. Por ejemplo, los artistas lo emplean para disolver la pintura al óleo.
    Y luego está el Símil aguarrás -que és lo que lleva la botella de tu enlace- que es un derivado del petróleo, normalmente fracciones ligeras que aparecen durante el proceso de refinado.

    Si tu hornillo lo permite, puedes utilizar keroseno. Normalmente se le llama petróleo o parafina. El más indicado es el empleado para las estufas de petróleo llamadas "de infrarrojos". Estas estufas no tienen salida de humos al exterior, lo que obliga a emplear un combustible sin aditivos ni aromatizantes.

    Una búsqueda por internet te permitirá encontrar facilmente Fuel Coleman, Heptano, parafina y Exano en muchos lugares.

    Que es mejor quemar en tu hornilo? Lo primero es estudiar que combustible son aptos para cada hornillo según especifica el fabricante. En el gran grupo de la gasolina de automoción (sin plomo) / gasolina blanca yo te recomendaría esta última. La gasolina de automoción contiene muchos productos que son beneficiosos para el motor (lubricantes, antidetonantes...) pero que no te sirven en nada al usarlo en un hornillo y, además, pueden ser tóxicos. Aún peor el simil aguarrás, ya que esa denominación admite todo tipo de elementos volátiles y ligeros, que están pensados para disolver pinturas y no para quemarlos en tu cocina!

    Si tu hornillo admite parafina / keroseno o petróleo yo te recomiendo que te decantes por este combustible. Aunque te cueste un poco más el calentamiento del hornillo, su poder calorífico y su mayor seguridad frente a la gasolina hacen de la parafina el mejor combustible en climas templados como la costa mediterranea.

    Como encontrar estos productos: Gasolina blanca se vende en España con el nombre de Fuel Coleman y como te indica el amigo @Afterburner, lo puedes comprar online en Ferrehogar y otros.

    También puedes comprar Heptano, calidad comercial, en Manuel Riesgo HEPTANO COMERCIAL 5 L - Manuel Riesgo . Si vas a usarlo en ambientes MUY FRIOS puedes comprar, en esa misma casa, Exano.

    En los centros de bricolage de Francia se vende Essence "C" que es gasolina blanca.

    En época de invierno en las grandes ferreterías o los centros de bricolage encuentras la parafina para estufa de infrarrojos. La marca Qlima es buena. Como que no es tan volátil como la gasolina puedes almacenar este combustible en casa sin peligro.

    Tengo un hornillo Omnifuel en casa. Me lo prestaron para que lo arreglase. En este caso fue por un uso continuado de gasolina de automoción. En otra ocasión conocí un hornillo que se atascaba porque su propietario guardaba la gasolina en un botella de plástico de agua. La gasolina iba disolviendo el plástico hasta que obturaba el gasificador. Ahora ya está reparado.

    He utilizado el Omnifuel con Heptano. No lo he probado con parafina, pero seguro que funciona bien!

    Para un uso continuado de gasolina de automoción te recomiendo los clásicos, duros e indestructibles hornillos soviéticos Shmell1 y Shmell2

    Y por último: Por favor, NO QUEMES MÁS AGUARRÁS!

    Un saludo
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2020
  12. Afterburner

    Offline
    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2014
    Messages:
    1,978
    My Spanish knowledge is very-very limited just to get food, drinks and accommodation but that "El amigo Afterburner" sounds very nice for my ears. :thumbup::lol: