JUWEL 17

Discussion in 'Juwel No:17' started by kerophile, Sep 20, 2006.

  1. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Hi, I thought I would share with you some images of a Jewel 17 I acquired in October last year.

    This is a really nice 1.75 pint collapsible stove made in Germany.
    Note that the pump knob doubles as a cap for the "reserve" tank.
    The flame spreader is actually made out of steel.

    1354575337-P1000574_edited.jpg

    1354575345-P1000575_edited.jpg 1354575354-P1000576_edited.jpg 1354575363-P1000577_edited.jpg

    The container is actually better than the stove so I will show it in a separate posting.

    Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
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  2. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Hi, here is the second part of the Juwel 17 post, The Tin.

    I aplogise for the "flare" in the photos and I really will need to take a course in photography once I have cracked stove fettling!

    However, aren't the Graphics wonderful?
    1225698643-P1000578_edited.jpg

    A German Artist's impression of the export of the Juwel stove, and the wonderful lands where it could end up being used.
    1225698649-P1000579_edited.jpg 1225698656-P1000580_edited.jpg 1225698668-P1000581_edited.jpg 1225698675-P1000582_edited.jpg

    They don't make them like they used to!

    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 27, 2015
  3. Gordon

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    Kero: As a compulsive collector of Juwels I have to say that you have done a fantastic job of your 17. :lol: Do you have any other Juwels in your stash? 8) BTW your polishing technique produces great results! Have you gotten into replating in you stove reconstruction efforts? I know that nickle is used extensively but some of the "silvery" plate must be a thin coating of tin. Certain items, such as heat shields, seem to rust out much faster than you would expect with a good plating of nickle. Do you have any idea what metals have been use in plating our stoves and which parts get plated with which metal? Again: Great work there!! :) :) Gordon
     
  4. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Hi Gordon, you raise a number of interesting points, which I will try to answer:

    1. This is my only Jewel, as I came to the brand through the 1.75 pint collapsible stove connection, rather than through the maker.

    2. I have not yet indulged in re-plating although I have the ability.

    3. I touched on my Philosophy of Restoration once before. I will remove tarnish from Brass, Carbon and crud from legs and windshields but I would draw the line at plating or re-plating. I guess these arguments are well rehearsed in the Art world and Auto restoration, but I feel it is all too easy to flip over into pastiche when restoring or "improving" a classic stove.

    4. One exception would be replacement legs, as long as the intention was not to deceive. Originally, you are quite right, these were "tinned" with solder to provide corrosion protection in use, and aid assembly by soldering. When legs require replacement, we can no longer purchase them from the Primus Catalogue, so we must make them ourselves. Bryan Miller has taught me how to make them from either mild steel or stainless steel ( the latter is difficult because of the work-hardening propensity of SS). However, good "tinning" is difficult for the amateur. Exeter Yak is doing some development work on hot-dipping, but I believe that true tin plating might be more accessible for the amateur stove restorer.

    5. I have examined a number of different stove legs in order to understand the coating techniques used, and how these changed over time. The majority of manufacturers used solder-dipping but an Eriksson, collapsible, 1.75 pint stove I have, appears to have electro-plated legs, and the legs of this Juwel 17 also look perhaps too shiny for hot-dipped solder.

    6. Where Manufacturers did offer plating of their stoves it was almost invariably Nickel plating. There is no doubt that there was also a lot of individual enterprise at work and a number of stoves were no doubt retro-plated at the individual's workplace, without the permission of the management!

    7. Manufacturers also used "brass" plating to produce "Brassed", steel flame rings, and the outer caps of steel silent burners to improve their appearance at the point of sale. There was never any intention that these coatings would survive the normal service conditions of a stove.

    Aren't Stoves fascinating?
    Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
  5. Gordon

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    In regards to hot dip tinning (soldering?) do you know a source that would address the proper technique? Is a flux used? Do you think they use 100% tin, no lead? I have two complete different models of the NOKO stove from Austria. In four years of collecting I have never before seen either model as a complete stove, other than these two. Ian kindly published to this site some photos I sent him a while back of one of the stoves. The other just arrived a few days ago. Since they are so unique I would like to completely restore them to their original conditon, including metal plating or dipping as applicable. Your suggestions would be greatly appreciated. :lol: :lol: Gordon