Liquid fuelled stoves of the Swedish Armed Forces

Discussion in 'Other' started by stejar, Jan 5, 2015.

  1. tekkster

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    Wow....incredible.
     
  2. UncleRob

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    Thank you for that superb account.

    You imply the that so-called "Military Trangia" (ENMANSKÖK MT) only got its windshield and burner in the early 1960s. So from 1940 until the early '60s it wasn't a stove at all, just a couple of mess tins? That would explain why the windshield and burner are often seen without the mess tins.
    Do you know why there were both stainless and aluminium versions of the mess tins? There are various contradictory explanations around, such as the one which says the stainless version was introduced during WWII because of a shortage of aluminium. Do you know where the truth lies?
    Finally, heres a picture of an Optimus 111 which has features of both the first version (No FIV-number on the plaque and no “utgåva 2” inside) and the second version (Silver sticker and no embossed 111 on the lid) .

    SwedishArmyOptimus111Top.jpg

    Thanks again for a great post.

    Rob
     
  3. stejar

    stejar Subscriber

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    First, thank you all that has added information on this subject. As my work tend to leave me with very little “hobby time” for long periods, I am notorious bad at re-visiting discussions like this one.

    UncleRob: I have never seen any rock-solid proof that it was aluminium shortage that caused the stainless version of the KOKKÄRL M/40, but it is very probable that that is was happened. Sweden has no aluminium mines, but plenty of iron. And thanks for the photo of the “hybrid” Optimus 111!

    As it turns out I have some added information on the Optimus 181 F used by the Swedish Armed Forces:

    Optimus 181 F in VÄRMESTÄLL fm/60 (Heating Rack Trial Model/60) and M2824-102119 VÄRMESTÄLL (Heating Rack)

    This set is seldom seen. I have not found any traces of the Trial Model in any data base I have access to or in any other public database. As it is a set only intended for tests and trials it is not that strange. (“fm/60” stands for “försöksmodell 1960” i.e. Trial Model 1960) None the less, I had expected to at least find it in the Swedish Army Museum's database. As this set was used in military trials that took place in the early 1960’s, it was no longer in the inventory in the late 1960’s and left no traces when the Material Administration database was re-done at that time. Un-like many other trial models it was included in the Armed Forces inventory as M2824-102119 VÄRMESTÄLL, but probably only in small numbers.

    The set consists of the 3-part box, two Optimus 181 F and some accessories. The box is very sturdy (even for army issue) but very simple with just an open-front box, a lid and a grate. The two Optimus 181 F are rare examples of of-the-shelf stoves actually stamped with the military “Three Crowns” markings. The marking on these two can be found on the flat iron that supports the burner. Which accessories that were included originally is impossible to say. When I found it, it contained a plastic alcohol can in its un-opened original wrapping, a fixed wrench and two siphons (including one Optimus). It seems reasonable that these accessories are original and included in the kit from the beginning. Apart from that, there were an opened package of Radius 0/87 cleaning needles. They make less sense since they are intended to be used with for example Radius 1 and 5. The burner on the Optimus 181 has a built in cleaning-needle and don’t really need an external one.

    There is a really tight fit when one tries to close the box. The scruff marks on the Optimus sticker at the front of the stove are tell-tale signs of that. The normal transport configuration appears to be with the right stove turned around so that both founts are facing each other in the middle of the box. Even though there appears to be plenty of room for the two Optimus 181 to move sideways within the box, the fit is so tight that they don’t actually move at all.

    Värmeställ 12.jpg

    Värmeställ 15.jpg

    This set is unused, although there are some marks and rust on the box after over 55 years of occasional handling.
    /Stefan

    More photos here.
     
  4. snwcmpr

    snwcmpr SotM Winner Subscriber

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    WOW!!!
     
  5. stejar

    stejar Subscriber

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    KOKKÄRL FM/55 (Mess Tin Trial Model 55)

    Strictly speaking this is not a stove, but it is added as a complement. The Mess Tin Trial Model 55 is made of stainless steel and consists of the lover part (with two handles with hooks and a locking mechanism on the short sides) a lid and a handle/grip. The grip is used to lift the lid when it is used as a pot and put over open fire. The lover part can be also used as a pot if hanged over open fire in the hooks. The handles with hooks can be attached to another mess tin so you can carry a whole stack of KOKKÄRL FM/55 if you fetch food or water for the whole squad. You can also attach the steel three-part cutlery set M/29 to the handle/grip.

    There is not much information on this piece of equipment, but it is briefly mentioned in Leif Högbergs book “Snuskburken” from 2013.

    It is obvious that there was a lot of trials going on in the 1950’s on how to equip the soldiers with mess tins and stoves. KOKKÄRL FM/55 was not adopted but instead a windscreen and burner was added to the mess tin KOKKÄRL M/40 to provide every soldier with his own stove. Another example from this time is the testing of Esbit 27 KOKUTRUSTNING, ENMANS M/1957 (cooking equipment, one-man m/1957) that resulted in the procurement of Optimus 91 (ENMANSKÖK JÄGARE MT) in the late 1950’s or early 1960’s.

    Kokkärl fm55_4.jpg

    Kokkärl fm55_5.jpg

    Mathämtare A.jpg


    More photos here.
    /Stefan
     
  6. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Howdy, Stefan,

    I have to say again, this is a wonderful thread, and I thank you for all the hard work you undertook to make it happen!! Yes, for me, this is one of my most favorite posts here on CCS!!!! Well done, and HUZZAH for your dedication to and love of these Swedish Military stoves, and thank you for sharing all there here!! Take care, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc
     
  7. Jack Enright

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    Hi, Stefan,

    firstly, many thanks for all the time and work you put into compiling this record of Swedish military stoves, and for sharing it with the rest of us.

    I've just bought a part-complete Enmanskök MT on E-bay, though it has not yet arrived. This is the link to the item in question:
    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/262930459894

    What it includes is the following:

    Kokkärl M/40AL, Mess Kit, Aluminium
    Vindskydd M Stöd, Windscreen M2824-001129-3
    And a burner which appears to be the same as the one you've shown in the picture above:
    Spritbrännare Alcohol Burner M2824-001119-4

    It doesn't include the cutlery set, the cup, or the plastic spirit bottle, though.

    The windscreen is stamped with Svea's three crowns, NC 66 below them, and SVEA below that; the outer pot with the bail handle is stamped NC 61; the frying pan is stamped NC 59 on the inside of the rim; and the base of the burner has the three crowns, NC 65, and SVEA underneath it.

    Do these numbers mean that the parts were made in 1966, 1961, 1959 and 1965 respectively?

    With regards to the burners, you said:
    So, even though my burner is stamped SVEA, was it actually made by Trangia? (always assuming that it is one made for the Enmanskök, and not a later civilian replacement).

    In the section above on these kits, you said:
    It's hard to be certain about the colour of the set I've just bought, as I think the colours are a bit distorted in the photos uploaded by the seller, but it looks more like the old Wehrmacht 'feldgrau' to me; half-way between green and grey, rather than the deep green shown in your picture you've shown of the M.40 Mess Kit, above.

    From the look of the paint on the underside of the large pot in the set I've bought, it appears that colour of paint has been on the pot for some years - and not recently put on by the last owner just before he offered it for sale. So is that colour likely to have been the original, or might it be an originally unpainted one made for the Civil Defence, and painted later?

    Thank you again, Stefan, and best regards,

    Jack
     
  8. johanKK Sweden

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    Some army staffs had it too in there kitchen detc.