Lux No.1 c1934 Internal-NRV chromed

Discussion in 'Lux' started by igh371, Feb 3, 2017.

  1. igh371

    igh371 SotM Winner Subscriber

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    DSC05325.JPG

    Here is a chromed Lux No.1 stove that does not seem to appear in even the 1912 and 1913 catalogues, namely one with an internal NRV pressure pump assembly. All of the engravings and legends, the Lux log on the filler cap, the trade-mark Lux-type spirit cup etc etc are all exactly as one would expect from a late-period Lux 2-pint stove. But all 'normal' Lux stoves have an external NRV pump assembly very similar to that also used by Svea; and this is all that is shown in all extant catalogues upto and including 1913. But not this one! So my initial assumption is that this was a development that could only date from the very very end of Lux production, presumably in 1914, just before the stove side of the business was sold to Optimus.

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    (It is possible that this other gallery link also has a Lux No.1 with an internal-NRV pump, but it was not made obvious in the posting)
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2017
  2. Afterburner

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    Nice one! :thumbup: Does it have a Lux burner?
     
  3. igh371

    igh371 SotM Winner Subscriber

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    The burner is unbranded.
    Which also reminds me, another point of interest is the pump tube end - huge - same size as that fitted to eg the Primus 7xx series 'furnace' burners!
     
  4. Afterburner

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    That makes pumping more easy. I like those huge pump knobs.:thumbup:

    Those early stoves have been on use in times when all correct spares were not available in local store so maybe they have used parts that local store had happen to had in their stock. So old often stoves have parts from various brands.
     
  5. Christer Carlsson

    Christer Carlsson Moderator SotM Winner

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    That's a very interesting stove, Ian.
    I do also assume that it's from the very last period of the stove production under Lux, so 1914 would be a very fair guess.
    The tank lid is also of the last model which was continued by Optimus, just with their logo instead, of course. It's not shown in the 1913 and earlier catalogues.
    Same goes with the nickel plating; it's not mentioned as an option anywhere.
     
  6. abbahco1

    abbahco1 Subscriber

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    I have two Lux stoves from this period, a No. 1 and a No. 16 (which appear to be identical). Both have the Optimus-like features: globe filler cap, angled airscrew, dimpled, non-integral spirit cup. I am thinking that Optimus must have purchased Lux in 1914 and retained the brand name for a time, as the design of these Optimus/Lux stoves in no way resembles those illustrated in either the 1912 or 1913 Lux catalogues (or any of the Optimus stoves from that period, either). In fact, the design of these two stoves of mine resembles much more the Optimus look of the middle-later 1920s, so I wonder if Optimus sold some of its products with the Lux brand considerably after the time it acquired Lux. Of course, this is exactly what Optimus did in the 1960s, after it acquired Primus and Svea: simply manufacturing its own models with these brand names. Optimus seems to have done something similar with Sirius: same filler cap, airscrew mount, spirit cup etc. The leg design on my two Lux stoves is exactly the same as that of this Optimus stove from a 1920s poster. Optimus draft.jpg
     
  7. abbahco1

    abbahco1 Subscriber

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    That pump knob is not original to the stove, nor is the cast-iron top. I'll post some photos of two Lux stoves (Nos. 1 & 16) from that period which have all original parts. I'm quite sure that these are manufactured by Optimus in the 1920s under the Lux brand.
     
  8. igh371

    igh371 SotM Winner Subscriber

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    @abbahco1 That is a very very interesting proposition you raise regarding a possible continuation of the Lux brand name on stoves by Optimus into the period 1914-1924. One photo possibly relevant to this discussion which I unaccountably missed from the original post above is the tank base marking:
    DSC05323.JPG
    This base stamp includes the full 'AKT.BOL.LUX' provenance. And this does raise a further question. As far as we are aware Optimus only certainly acquired the stove manufacturing plant from Lux. The Lux company itself was not acquired, that continued as a major manufacturer in its own right but concentrating on other aspects of its business. Now Optimus may also have acquired rights to use the 'Lux' brand name on stoves too, but I question whether Optimus would have been able to claim and use the full Lux company provenance for products even if they were able to use the brand name. How would Swedish company law have operated in this area? It would not have been comparable to the later situation regarding Primus and Svea where, yes Optimus 'badge engineered' some of its products to utilise those brand names, but they certainly did not use the old owners' company names on those offerings. So more questions!
    Ian.
     
  9. abbahco1

    abbahco1 Subscriber

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    Mine have the same stamp. My inquiry is based mainly on style: these look nothing like the Lux stoves up to 1913 (see catalogue) and a lot like Optimus stoves of a decade later. My assumption was that Optimus bought Lux and adopted its characteristics (globe filler cap & dimpled spirit cup) but I can't see evidence that either Lux or Optimus used those features as early as 1914. So, it's a bit mysterious.