M-1941 US Military

Discussion in 'Military' started by Archivist, May 11, 2008.

  1. Archivist

    Archivist Archivist

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    Courtesy of David Baker

    WWII vintage stove, these were made By various makers - Coleman, AGM,
    The Coleman models was also known by model no:520.
    This stove was also known as the Ernie Pyle stove after the American war correspondent.

    Date & maker not given with this submission.

    1354822325-m1941.jpg
     
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  2. flivver

    flivver United States Subscriber

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    Hi all: The stove that is referred to as the "Ernie Pyle" stove is the earlier version of the 1941 520 that has the nickel tank, very similar to the post war civilian 530. The nickel 520 was only made for a short time then came the green version. See 530 post in reference gallery for in depth discussion. Mike...
     
  3. Littledre

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    You're 100% right Mike, the Ernie Pyle version is very rare but when they do come up on ebay they sell high. One did show up in May and I had a snipe at £100 but never got close. :cry: That particular 1941 520 never had any tools and was minus its carry tin, it was also in poor condition but to have a chance of owning one [-o< A complete 1941 520 in mint would make a stack. :shock:
     
  4. Spiritburner

    Spiritburner Admin Subscriber

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    I know what you guys are saying. The stove Ernie Pyle had was earlier but was the nickname not applied to the later variants as well? I can't imagine people making the distinction at the time.
     
  5. Littledre

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    No Ross, the EP stove was nickel plated with brass fittings and the latter 520 was green paint over steel. There was only 1000 1941 520's made but 100 of thousands of green tank 520's The stove presented to EP was one of the 1000 nickel plated stoves. So call it a limited addition if you like.
     
  6. flivver

    flivver United States Subscriber

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    Hi Ross/Den: Time muddles all. In the U.S. today all hand crank phonographs are generically referred to as victrolas. At the time of their manufacture "Victrola" was a trademarked name that referred to a type (style) of machine manufactured by only one U.S. company (Victor Talking Machine Co.) It makes it very hard for collectors to identify machines with out actually seeing them as all types are now called the same.
    WW11 soldiers that I have talked to including the solider that gave me an early nickel 520 style Ernie Pyle stove, stated the 520 of all years was known as the type of stove E.P. carried verses the M42 A.G.M. style. They did however state the actual E.P. stove was the earlier nickel (special) variety. Pictures of Ernie being presented with the stove and later using the stove were widely published in both GI publications as well as papers in the U.S. usually accompanied by a Coleman ad. Coleman printed many ads during the war about Ernie receiving the stove noting that it was the low production early variety and that the GI's were receiving a stove of the same type. Distinguishing his stove from the huge supply of 520's to come later in the war that were painted green and no longer had the word Coleman stamped on them. This has been lost to history and today all 520's are mistakenly referred to by many as Ernie Pyle stoves, instead of E.P. "type". Sad to say I no longer have my Ernie Pyle stove but I do have the 1941 green 520 style which to my mind is the real GI stove as this is the one they carried along with the M42 etc.. Mike...
     
  7. Spiritburner

    Spiritburner Admin Subscriber

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    I fully & completely understand that.
     
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  8. Spiritburner

    Spiritburner Admin Subscriber

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    My mistake. I didn't realise this was a more recent faux pas.
    I'd thought, through his continued praise of the stove, that 'Ernie Pyle Stove' had become a nickname for all 520's at the time - despite the differences & limited numbers of the stove actually given to Pyle.

    http://www.privateletters.net/EXTRA/capparelle/19.jpg
    from
    http://www.privateletters.net/photos.html
     
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  9. flivver

    flivver United States Subscriber

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    Hi Ross: Awesome links!!! With time words change, maybe I am a little anal. I just believe we should know the history. On this site it is especially important. If one spent a large sum on a green 520 thinking they were buying the very type Ernie had, then post purchase realized it was a later type. That would be a bummer, but of course as collectors we realize this is all part of the game. We just like to keep those mistaken buys at a minimum. Sure soldiers at the time were endeared to the stove fore many reasons, but remember Ernie was a respected known reporter and long time journalist that championed the U.S. solider but his real fame came after his death at the end of the war. Mike...
     
  10. RonPH

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    Thats one reason why I treasure my M1950 and Rogers stoves as they are part of our history albeit my Rogers stove has not seen action as its an NOS and quite reasonably priced. We who have them are lucky to have one in working order. Had purchased one months ago which had serious brass stress and had to let it go as parts rather than sitting as a paper weight. I will have to check the pump handle if it indeed contain some of the parts as it did look weird having a fat pump shaft. Thanks to the more experienced CCS members a little bit more knowledge on military stoves.
     
  11. RonPH

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    I then proceeded in pulling out both stoves from their snug bag/tins and opened the pump handle and I did find (in both) complete sets of parts. Ingenious. As one CCS member suggested, upcoming camp stove manufacturers should take a hint on 1) supplying extra parts for the stove and 2) a nice nich within the stove to keep those parts rather than in a plastic bag separately (and forget where you placed it).

    Come to think of it though some micro stoves do not have much moving parts or parts that require replacing and much so they are being sold more of a "disposable" rather than repairable.

    Indeed, I learned something today.
     
  12. flivver

    flivver United States Subscriber

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    Ron: I have had no experience with M1950 but am well aware of it's sterling reputation and I believe it was manufactured for many years, a great soldiers stove. Nice find. Mike...