M-1942-MOD ( Preway 1945)

Discussion in 'Military' started by Knight84, Sep 27, 2009.

  1. Knight84

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    Here is my M-1942 Mod. Made by Prentiss Waber (Preway) in 1945
    Stamped
    U.S.
    M-1942-MOD.
    PW-1-45

    1254019996-IMG_2042_opt.jpg
    1254022557-IMG_1495_opt.jpg

    Down on the creek near the waterfall.
    1254020019-IMG_2018_opt.jpg

    Next to the M-1950. Similar in height, weight, and of course diameter.
    1254020031-IMG_2048_opt.jpg

    The stove comes with a tool that clips onto the pot support. The stove weighs 674 grams with the tool, no fuel and no spare parts. The part supports and tank appear to be made out of stainless steel.

    From what I have been able to find Bestor Robinson was the inventor of the stove. He was a citizen of the United States and a rock climber and skier. He was also Club Vice President of the San Francisco Bay Chapter of the Sierra Club. He helped the U.S. Army with mountain training, climbing and skiing. Many members of the Sierra Club joined the what would be the 10th Mountain Division ski troops

    He filed several patents in his time.

    The patent for the pot support arm or leg.
    Patent No. D133440

    The patent for the original M-1942 stove (wheel model)
    Patent No. 2354221

    Another patent of the early model.
    Patent No. 2455950

    There is also another design of the stove here. This design seems to never been made.
    Patent No. 2331931

    A design for a folding leg.
    Patent No. D133054

    He also invented the M 1942 two burner stove. Patent No. D133049
    Patent No. D133049

    The M-1942 Mod exploded view (Note the grahite packing for the cleaning lever is not present nor is the knob for the lever.)
    1254020831-IMG_1969_opt.jpg

    The early wheel model M-1942 used the standard Coleman fuel tube. The M-1942-MOD uses just a simple pipe.
    1254021055-IMG_1976_opt.jpg

    As you can see the cleaning lever is unique design. Note: don't remove the cleaning lever. You will most likely destroy the graphite packing.
    The packing is in the parts clip on most stoves I have found or fixed over the years.
    1254021412-IMG_2050_opt.jpg

    A closer view of the cleaning lever and eccentric block.
    1254021425-IMG_2052_opt.jpg

    In this picture you can see where the eccentric block goes. The small hole to the left is where the fuel comes from after it comes by the control valve. Fuel does not pass by the block like on the Coleman 520 (M-1941)
    1254021858-IMG_2056_opt.jpg

    The pump exploded view. There is storage for spare parts inside the inner pump tube (smaller tube)
    1254022211-IMG_1982_opt.jpg 1254022378-IMG_1983_opt.jpg

    The M-1942-MOD compared to the Coleman 520
    1254022387-IMG_1988_opt.jpg
    There are some other pictures in this Post

    From left to right. Coleman 520, M-1942-Mod, M-1950, and Optimus Nova tools.
    1254022758-IMG_2059_opt.jpg

    There are some pictures comparing the generators of the other military stove here(internal link) Link

    I believe the M-1942-MOD was a huge jump forward for American stoves. I think it was a shame that companies like Coleman failed to build upon this stove. Though I do find it funny how later Coleman stoves would have very similar feet/legs. I guess the patent ran out. At least they made stoves that could truly simmer on the other hand. :lol:

    Cheers,
    Jeff
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2015
  2. idahostoveguy

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    Jeff,

    You do great work. I really like these posts you are doing.

    Thanks,
    sam
     
  3. Lance

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    Jeff the patents did not run out. These stoves were DOW Department of War sourced, as such all patents were owned by the US Government. In an effort to make them avaiable to the troops as soon as possible the designs were given to many manufacters for production.

    Bester may have patented the designs prior to the war and then offered them to the government in support of the war effort. Or as happened in the Manhatten Project, the inventor of a device may have actually patented the device but he was then paid by the Government, a meger sum, for his invention.

    This happened for many war sourced items, among them being all the new developments for the A-bomb, quonset huts, PSP (pierced steel planking), The and went on to include almost any device needed or used for the war effort.

    Typically the Governmnet never sold the patents back to the original inventor.

    lance
     
  4. Knight84

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    Thank you Sam. I really have enjoyed toying with these stoves. The medical stoves are my next goal. But I think It has made me a bigger fan of kero burners. Its seems the more time and deeper I get into these stove the more I like the smell of kerosene. :lol: :lol:


    Thanks you Lance!

    Seems like the Government got a good deal. :lol: There are no patent numbers stamped or marked on the M-1942 nor the M-1950. Unlike the Coleman 520 burners.
    Thanks again

    Cheers,
    Jeff
     
  5. itchy

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    Very nice work and research. Thanks.
     
  6. Knight84

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    Thank you itchy!

    I wanted to add these photos of the burner heads too but they slipped my mind.

    This is a burner head from the M-1942-MOD. Both the M-1942 and M-1950 are made out of stainless steel with a brass liner and nut. The brass liner is riveted to the brass nut. It also appears to be brazed in place. You can see the drain holes in the bottom of the burners. There are three drain holes and three large rectangle holes/openings that allow for air flow and also the pot supports fold through.
    1254180474-IMG_2101_opt.jpg

    From left to right. M-1942-MOD and M-1950
    The two burner heads are very similar.

    1254180489-IMG_2099_opt.jpg

    Cheers,
    Jeff
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 27, 2015
  7. hikin_jim

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    A fabulous stove. Love the photo outdoors -- the rightful place for a good stove like this.
     
  8. trk

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    How did you remove the washer with notches in it? Mine looks like it is made out of brass?
     
  9. Knight84

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    Hello,

    Yes the part in question is made of brass.

    1318647674-100_2565_opt.jpg


    The first one of these stove I fixed I used a pair of long needle nosed pliers. It has standard threads. You just need to loosen the nut a bit. The nut just holds down the pot support. The last one of these stoves I fixed all I needed to do was unscrew the whole valve assembly.
    You may be able to 'cheat' and just unscrew the valve from the tank. But sometimes you need to loosen off that nut before the pot support will turn.

    Cheers,
    Jeff
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2015
  10. trk

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    I was able to "cheat" by unscrewing the whole valve assembly. Thanks for the tip. There appears to be a groove around the opening of the tank with nothing in it. Is there a gasket that is suppose to fit in the grove? If I need one, do you know where I can find a replacement? Also,I could use a new on and off valve knob.
     
  11. davidcolter

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    The gasket to seal the fuel filler goes inside the turned-over lip of the pump tube. You will need a new one of those, if the original one is still there it will be rock hard and wont seal. Same with the pip inside the pump check valve. M1950 spares from oldcolemanparts.com will fit the '42 as well.
     
  12. trk

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    Is there a gasket that goes between the top of the M-1942 tank and the bottom of the pot holder? If so, where can I get a replacement? Also, do I need to put some type of sealer on the threads that screw into the tank from the valve assembly?
     
  13. Knight84

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    Hello,

    I am glad that worked out for you.

    There is no gasket there. The threads are not tapered either. The threads make a seal and all the seal needed. You could put some gas thread tape on the threads or use a gas safe thread sealant but no real need. It isn't a high pressure tank.

    That said I pressure test all my stoves before lighting them after fixing.

    I believe I have a few spare knobs for that stove. And the red knob for the cleaning lever.

    Cheers,
    Jeff
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2015
  14. ww2nut

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    Hi Jeff,

    I have the 1942MOD made by Aladdin. I have got it for a while now but I can't seem to get it up and running.I'm still looking for someone who knows where I can get the wrench and maybe a manual of some sort. Can you help me out?

    Mike
    The Netherlands
     
  15. Ian

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    Don't know about a manual, but you can get a very good replica M1942 wrench from here.

    I've recently bought one and Joe's service is 1st rate all-round.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2015
  16. ww2nut

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    Great find Ian.
    That helps me a lot.

    Thanks