M-1942 running

Discussion in 'Stove Forum' started by davidcolter, Oct 7, 2011.

  1. davidcolter

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    I came home today to a parcel from the US. Inside was an M-1942 via eBay.

    I think it had been given some attention in its previous life because the fuel cap seal was fresh and pliable. The NRV pip was rock solid so I replaced that. After a dab of oil on the pump leather and a good pressure test I took it outside behind a windbreak of tomato crates (which look a bit like old ammo crates if you squint and wish very hard).

    I filled it with Aspen, primed it with a few seconds of fuel and lit it. The generator was hissing in no time so I opened it up and it roared into life. I had a tin of beef chilli in my stainless GI canteen which it cooked through quickly.

    I will save the proper pics until I have cleaned off the grime a bit but for now, enjoy this:

    IMG_20111007_201656.jpg
     
  2. Knight84

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    Sweet!

    I look forward to seeing the fettled stove. Never get tired of seeing the m-1942.

    I have to take a few more pics of mine running with the silent damper.

    Jeff
     
  3. davidcolter

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    There was a break in the rain this morning so I made breakfast:

    The case is very dark, unlike my M-1950 and M-1941 tins. It doesnt look like paint, maybe its phosphate or anodizing... does anyone know more?

    IMG_20111009_095032.jpg

    I love the way the pot legs fold and latch. It has the wrench, I passed up on several that didnt.

    IMG_20111009_095122.jpg

    It was well used when I unpacked it. Believe it or not, this is actually cleaner than it was. It is a 1944 Aladdin.

    IMG_20111009_095133.jpg

    So I lit it up:

    [media=youtube]u38qYj4tuRc[/media]

    And brewed up with my GI canteen cup:

    IMG_20111009_095548.jpg

    And then cooked up some noodles in my Crusader canteen cup:

    IMG_20111009_100431.jpg

    I love the '42, its so simple. Stainless steel construction has kept it in perfect working condition despite being nearly 70 years old. What a classic!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2015
  4. toonsgt

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    A true classic, and will outlast all of us. I wish more stoves were stainless.

    Check the weight of the case compared to your others. I have a couple of steel ones that are much heavier than the aluminum ones. They are interchangeable as far as fit goes. Not sure of the treatment of the steel. Kind of looks zinc galvanized.

    Not sure which was in shorter relative supply, steel or aluminum. Production of everything here was on such a huge scale at the time. Not sure how true this is, but I heard that the vast majority of pots and pans and other scrap that was collected from households across the country to aid in war production ended up not being used. The scrap drives were allegedly organized to give the public a feeling that they were helping the cause. Can anyone confirm or refute this?

    Mike
     
  5. davidcolter

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    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2015
  6. Texas

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    David, that doesn't look like "parekerizing" to me but I may be wrong.

    Mike, I kinda doubt that statement that much of the scrap wasn't used altho I have no real knowledge of the times. I do know (have heard) that food, gasoline, tires, etc were in short supply. I came along at the very end of WW2 and there just wasn't much aluminum in use back in the 40's-50's.
    Best,
    Bob