`Magnetic tank cleaning

Discussion in 'Fettling Forum' started by fyldefox, Dec 3, 2008.

  1. fyldefox

    fyldefox R.I.P.

    Offline
    Joined:
    May 30, 2005
    Messages:
    3,103
    This is another technique which might be of use in cleaning the inside of tanks.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 1, 2015
  2. North61

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2007
    Messages:
    242
    Location:
    Whitehorse, Yukon
    Now why didn't I think of that? Great idea. Thanks.
     
  3. sefaudi

    Offline
    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2004
    Messages:
    620
    So, the matter is to get a Neodymium Magnet.

    Really are they so strong?
     
  4. DAVE GIBSON

    DAVE GIBSON Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2004
    Messages:
    4,229
    very--very clever and well thought out.putting the magnet in the polishing cloth and the steel wool follow up are a step beyond what i would have done..those magnets can be found on the web.
    i have a plain magnet,but very strong,i'll have to try it out with that--
     
  5. parramethtrol

    parramethtrol Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2008
    Messages:
    2,727
    8) the best idea's are usually the simplest :clap:

    i read that you can clean the inside of engine blocks by electrolysis by filling the cavity with soda solution and then feeding a wire inside some plastic tubing that has small holes in down through the opening then connecting the wire and engine block to the charger in the normal way,i haven't tried it but reckon it would work on steel tanks

    that and the polishing method in the link could be very effective,now i need an old steel tank to try it on ;)
     
  6. BernieDawg Banned

    Offline
    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2008
    Messages:
    1,656
    This is an absolutely superb idea! :clap:

    For years I cleaned the algae off the glass on my aquariums (no longer have them) using a pair of magnets that were faced with a Scotchbrite-like material. I never put that idea together with cleaning fonts/tanks. :doh: I've been using sand, BB's and a slosh of kero to do the job. And, boy, do I get worn out shaking that tank around. This adds another tool to the kit.

    Thanks Fyldefox for bringing that idea over from BBL! Most excellent! :thumbup: :thumbup:

    Cheers,
    Gary
     
  7. 111T

    111T Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2007
    Messages:
    1,863
    Location:
    Olean New York USA Earth
    Yeah they're very, very strong. That's a pretty good idea! :idea: :clap: :clap:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2015
  8. fyldefox

    fyldefox R.I.P.

    Offline
    Joined:
    May 30, 2005
    Messages:
    3,103
    Thinking about it, it should work better with non-magnetic rather than steel tanks :-k
     
  9. Dutchmike

    Offline
    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2007
    Messages:
    723
    Location:
    Netherlands
    Hello All, on steel tanks they will not work for the obvious reason of clinging too tight to move.
    But why bother? Anything to be (re)moved from inside the tank, be it sediment and / or oxidation, can be achieved simply by pouring in some nuts and bolts (the small size, that is, and no fluids) then shake and stirr. Scraping with just a washer might be appealing to those who can not bring themselves to an upper-body workout, but the former method is by far the speediest, as we can observe that action = reaction!

    Mike
     
  10. sefaudi

    Offline
    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2004
    Messages:
    620
    Hey Keith, you are 100% correct as with steel tanks, the magnet will loose most of its power onto the tank itself.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2015