Making a Silent Burner Cap

Discussion in 'Fettlers Master Class' started by BernieDawg, Oct 16, 2008.

  1. BernieDawg Banned

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    Hello gents

    I'm lucky enough to own a Primus #100. But, sadly, I'm missing both the flame plate and the silent burner apparatus for this stove. So, I decided to make my own.

    This is the stainless flame plate I made. It is made from 0.040" stainless sheet that I rough cut out with abrasive cut-off wheels. I filed it to finish shape and peened the dish shape with a hammer on my bench vise. I can bend the "legs" up or down to adjust the height from the orifice for ideal burning.

    Pic1.jpg Pic2.jpg Pic3.jpg Pic4.jpg Pic5.jpg



    This is the silent burner cap I fettled. It is a nominal 1 and 1/2" copper plumbing pipe cap. I cut down the height and used a paper template I made with Photoshop to layout the holes. I taped the template around the cap and used a spring-loaded center punch to mark the holes. I used a #56 drill and drilled 156 holes in 39 ranks of 4 holes each. The holes are spaced 3mm apart on center vertically and horizontally. "On center" means 3mm from center of one hole to center of the next hole. The center punch puts a small dint through the paper into the cap so that the drill tends to find and follow the dint. I really think that's the way to go with this project if, like me, your tooling is pretty crude. Whilst I have a drill press, I think it is possible to do the same job with a hand drill, good eyes and some patience.

    Pic6.jpg

    Pic7.jpg



    This picture shows the cap with an adapter plate and an inner cap. The inner cap is a 1 and 1/4" nominal copper plumbing pipe cap. I've cut it down in height and drilled a 5/8" diameter hole in the middle. The adapter plate is sized to fit on the "ledge" in the burner basket of the #100. I've brazed a 5/8" diameter piece of brass tubing in the center to align and hold the inner cap. The outer cap can move just a tiny bit from side to side when in place and I probably should put some nibs on the adapter plate to stop that movement.
    Pic8.jpg

    Some burning shots.
    Pic9.jpg Pic10.jpg Pic11.jpg


    These are the three copper plumbing pipe caps that work well with burner conversion projects. From the left, 1 1/2", 1 1/4", and 1" all nominal. ("Nominal" means "name". Which in this case refers to what you call the cap. The cap is actually a different outside diameter than it's name. For instance, the 1 1/2" is really about 1 5/8". :roll: ) The 1 1/2" cap works well as a #5 outer cap, the 1 1/4" works well as a #5 inner cap or a #4 outer cap, and the 1" works well as a #4 inner cap. The actual size of these caps is very close to the size of the Primus caps they replace.
    Pic12.jpg

    I've done some of the work for you should you feel compelled to ruin your eyes and drive yourself bonkers by making your own caps. :lol: The picture below shows the types/sizes of caps I have in my possession. From the left - brass P4196, Primus metal 4204, Primus metal 4205, brass 2183, and 4206.
    Pic13.jpg

    Here's the hole drilling data:
    Primus 4196 - brass
    5 rows of 52 holes spaced 2mm OC horizontally and 2mm OC vertically - uses a #55 drill, 260 holes

    Primus 4204 - Primus metal
    5 rows of 52 holes space 2mm OC horizontally and 2mm OC vertically, use a #55 drill, 260 holes

    Primus 4205 - Primus metal
    4 rows of 64 holes spaced 2mm OC horizontally and 3mm OC vertically, use a #56 drill, 256 holes

    Optimus 2183 - brass
    4 rows of 64 holes spaced 2mm OC horizontally and 2.5mm OC vertically, use a #56 drill, 256 holes

    Primus 4206 - Primus metal (I think?)
    6 rows of 74 holes spaced 2mm OC horizontally and 2mm OC vertically, use a #57 drill, 444 holes

    My copper cap
    4 rows of 39 holes spaced 3mm OC horizontally x 3mm OC vertically, use a #56 drill, 156 holes (so see, I cheated some) 8-[ :lol:

    This is the automatic center puch I use. "Automatic" means it's spring-loaded. Lean on it until it pops with a snap sound and it "automatically" strikes the work leaving a dint. Less than $20, mine is a General Tool model.
    Pic14.jpg


    This is the paper template I cranked out in Photoshop. I cut it out of the sheet before taping it to the cap.
    Pic15.jpg

    ---UPDATE---
    Since I originally posted this thread I've acquired a lovely Enders 100 from a very nice CCS member. I've found that it has a deeper burner basket than the Primus and the silent conversion caps I've fettled work better. Here's a couple of snaps. The full Enders 100 photo set is in the Stove Reference Gallery: Link
    Pic16.jpg Pic17.jpg

    One last note. The copper caps have demonstrated through use that they have a "limited" life. After burning, a layer of fine ash is on the surface of the copper. It flakes off as the cap cools down. I'm told that this is probably the copper oxidizing away. So far, I haven't seen any of my copper caps disolving into nothingness - they look just fine. But be aware these won't last as long as the Primus metal ones. On the other hand, a working copper cap is better than no cap at all.... ;)

    If you have any questions feel free to PT me. Sadly, my ISP sees CCS as a spammer so I can't subscribe to any of my threads or posts. :(

    Cheers,
    Gary
     
  2. parramethtrol

    parramethtrol Subscriber

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    :shock: :shock: :shock: awesome got to be another for the fettlers masterclass . if i had a hat i would take it off about now :clap: :clap: :clap:
     
  3. bark2much

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    Fantastique!!!
    That is a great piece of work, Gary! Theflame spreader looks and works just fine! Well, Looks like we have a master fettler amongst us. Maybe in the future you could come to rescue a few of us burn with too many thumbs.
     
  4. algentry1

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    You are now the first Official Member of the Stove Maker's Club, as invented right now, by me.


    Way Neat!!


    Best,
    Al
     
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  5. Radius1

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    Really good!
    High quality workmanship, and high quality photo`s :clap:
     
  6. Big Si

    Big Si Subscriber

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    Really really nice work there mate :) :) . I was thinking about having a go at this type of thing. You must have the patience of a saint. Keep up the good work. I'm amazed.

    Si
     
  7. Spiritburner

    Spiritburner Admin Subscriber

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    Simply outstanding! Thats certainly got the WOW factor!! :clap: Only one place for this - Moving it now! :clap:
     
  8. fyldefox

    fyldefox R.I.P.

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    Great stuff Gary :clap: :clap: :clap: you obviously have a wealth of patience :lol:
     
  9. barrabruce

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    :-k :shock: :lol: :lol: Excellent.
    About time someone did this.

    :evil: Now no reason I cant do the same with a black and decker holding the cap in my hands.

    Whats the drill size you used???

    Gealous of your work great work.


    Barra
     
  10. jlgatton

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    Absolutly beautiful work. I hope you ar patting yourself on the back, since we can't. You have just set the bar a little higher, well done.
     
  11. Bom Bom Bom Bom

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    I postrate myself before you and acknowledge your undisputed position as a Master Fettler.

    May your nipples never clog, your pump rod never fail and your valves never blow.
     
  12. bark2much

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    Amen, amen!
     
  13. angleofdangle

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    Wish i'd said that, so eloquent ! :lol:

    Regards,
    Alan
     
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  14. shagratork

    shagratork United Kingdom Moderator Subscriber

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    Good grief, what a FANTASTIC thread - absolutely brilliant, Gary! :shock: :shock: :D :D
     
  15. Murph

    Murph United States Subscriber

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    Alright, mates, back from baking my brains in the Arizona desert for nine days, and had a wonderful thought! :idea:

    I realized that if you made silent caps using automotive freeze plugs instead of copper pipe caps, the life of them would be FAR superior to the ones many of us have cobbled up using copper caps, and easier to silbraze, TOO! :whistle:

    No need for thanks, just ship the Guinness here, a case will do nicely, consider it priming the pump for the next idea! :D

    Murph
     
  16. yonadav

    yonadav Subscriber

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    Hey Murph,

    For those of us who live in frost-free climates (myself included, of course), what the hell is an automotive freeze plug?

    Yonadav
     
  17. Robtz

    Robtz Subscriber

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    May I?

    A frost plug is a metal cap held by friction set into the outside of (in this example) an engine block of a vehicle. In said vehicles, a number of plugs may be thus included in the block design. The plugs in normal situations form a 'plug' in the water-cooling core / channels / tubes within an engine; the water used to keep the engine at a particular temperature, unless it's a VW :thumbup: .

    Due to the inherent nature of water to expand when it freezes, without an element of pressure release the consequential effect can be a disasterous engine block fracture. Instead, the expanding ice forces the plugs out of the block before the pressure causes this damage.

    On engine start and with an astute, usually male, driver, one would notice the temperature climbing rapidly (due to the ice turning to water which is then forced through the opening of the non-existant plug) and immediately disable the engine using the key leaving a relatively simple, albeit unexpected job of inserting any (the same) frost plugs that had been ejected from the engine block. Refilling the water and glycol mix (there to stop the water freezing in the first place) a driver is able to continue his travels without the expense of a new engine :clap: .

    Of course, if it were a female driver ... :-#

    Looking for a hat and coat about now.

    Rob
     
  18. yonadav

    yonadav Subscriber

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    Thanks, Rob.

    Now, what's so nice about these plugs to make them candidate burner caps? Size? Shape? Material?

    Yonadav
     
  19. Robtz

    Robtz Subscriber

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    As frost plugs are generally made of steel rather than copper or brass, they would tend to last longer as a silent cap, although they would also be commensurately harder to manufacture, being of tougher material. It's all a balance.

    The shape is the same as the copper end caps that this thread started with i.e. a 'cup' shape, and therefore, with the right diameter, emminently suitable for a silent cap blank.

    Rob
     
  20. Murph

    Murph United States Subscriber

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    I did some more checking, and they ALSO make these plugs in brass!!!

    Murph