Manaslu 96

Discussion in 'Japan' started by presscall, Sep 8, 2018.

  1. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    It’s not your average ‘96’, not just distinguished (though mainly so) by the one-pint stove pattern roarer burner. Dismantling it enables me to show you what I mean.

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    Assembled ...

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    ... and packed away. In terms of dates of production over the past ten years or so to date, I think I’m right in saying that the version in a tin came first, then this one in a red zipped bag, latest in a black zipped back, but please do correct me if I’m wrong, anyone.

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    I’ll get the non-Manaslu component out of the way first, an English Lion brand 5/8 inch spanner (wrench) that I opened up the jaws of to fit the Manaslu’s 16mm burner flats. I also ground the inner curve of the jaws to a profile to fit the flats. I’ve nothing against the Manaslu item (though thinner steel stock isn’t so kind on brass flats) but the stove came without its spanner, so I pressed this one into use.

    D425828A-10A5-40A5-9B5B-C54F3E9AE7F9.jpeg E5B82DD6-F10E-4B37-99CA-28CC295C66EA.jpeg


    The Manaslu jet (on the left) isn’t the usual pattern (that groove below the lower part of the flats) - those two types to the right are what’s usually encountered. Though there is a chamfer at the outlet of Manaslu jet’s jet hole, it’s very subtle. Guides the jet pricker into the hole well enough though.

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    One other thing is that the jet orifice is 0.3mm diameter and a 0.32mm jet pricker doesn’t fit it. The Manaslu’s does, or a 0.23mm pricker would serve of course.

    Here’s one of those generic jets installed in the Manaslu burner. Threads are a match. I doubt the 0.02mm oversize would affect (make rich) the combustion unduly, though it’s something I’ll get around to trying out.

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    The jet seat was machined in hexagonal stock. Usually the jet seat is a threaded cylinder, brazed in place.

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    Though the jet seat has the look from the side of being a hexagonal nut brazed in place, the depth of threading confirms it’s of more substantial stock, properly rooted in a hexagonal hole in the burner tubing. Note the number ‘609’ on the burner hexagon flat facing the camera.

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    Number stamped on the base of the fuel tank doesn’t correspond, ‘712’.

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    Excellent standard of fabrication, evidenced by the ‘hidden bits’ like the burner tube installation in the burner mounting boss.

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    We’ve had discussion on CCS before on how many heatproof washers to install at the burner/spirit cup/burner riser joint.

    Manaslu go for two to ‘sandwich’ the spirit cup.

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    The photo of the burner riser shows the gauze filter inside.

    Here it is from below. Lead washer in place.

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    The Manaslu non-return valve (bottom) has full-width flats - usual NRV at top.

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    The NRV seal ‘pip’ is one of those all-in-one types without a brass carrier cup.

    B8D4F377-9608-482F-8A5B-2333451D043A.jpeg


    At top in that photo is a replacement pip, from (of all things) an Optimus Nova spares kit. The Manaslu’s was in good condition and I left it installed. The Manaslu NRV has a lead seal installed at the pump end cap, which is a good thing with less likelihood of it being difficult to remove when time comes to replace the NRV pip.

    044E9AF4-F24C-4D00-BAFB-E1D2E1BC165A.jpeg


    In THIS post and in THIS post too Ridge was concerned about the orange flames at the burner of his Manaslu. In the first of those posts I established it’s due to the oxidising effect of the burner flames on a stainless steel flame ring that in fact oxidises on getting red hot, the oxide colouring the flames.

    During a firing ...

    C6F39D8E-909F-4F3C-A0E5-3FC0D8602CB5.jpeg


    ... and the flame ring afterwards.

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    Flame ring with the oxide cleaned off.

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    Has the effect of the blue being restored to the flame.

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    Of course, it soon oxidises again, and the only sure solution is to replace the steel flame ring with a brass equivalent if the colour of the flames bother you.


    Fuel tank and burner details.

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    The stove’s a winning concept in my opinion, the compactness of a half-pint stove with the power of a one-pint one.

    John
     
  2. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    Great writeup, John. The burner makes a 96 a true hiking stove, rather than a wayside tea brewer.
     
  3. Marc

    Marc Subscriber

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    Fantastic work as usual, John. Great breakdown.

    Could the numbers on the burner and font be date codes? 609 being 9th month or week of '96 or '06?

    Perhaps an employee number for the one who built or did final QC inspection or approval on those components.
     
  4. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Could be. I’m heading to Chichester (UK) for a vacation in a month’s time and UK franchise dealer for Manaslu, Base Camp, is not far off in Littlehampton. I may pop in and have a chat with Mike there to see if he knows, or has a contact with Manaslu to get the lowdown.
     
  5. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

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    @presscall

    Great write up. :thumbup:

    I have one that it still unfired. The burner is stamped "309", and the tank "310". Mine was bought in Japan in 2013.

    I also have an unfired Manaslu 121 that I must post here in the Reference Gallery.

    Cheers

    Tony
     
  6. Marc

    Marc Subscriber

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    @presscall Good stuff sir, looking forward to hearing what you learn.
     
  7. MartyJ

    MartyJ Subscriber

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    I really enjoy your breakdowns sir. So complete and easy to understand. You deductions on the oxidation/yellow flame was a learning point. Thank you.
     
  8. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    @MartyJ
    Thanks Marty! I’m learning about a stove as I do it and visualise having a pal in tow with the same interest. I guess the ruse works.

    John
     
  9. Afterburner

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    Complete pictured documentation of Manaslu 96. Thank's for a jet interchangeability info @presscall. :thumbup:

    Manaslu (96) in one of the few classic type stoves that are still manufactured. They are very well made stoves! :clap: I have two; one with tin and one with black pouch. (@YOSH very kindly helped me to buy them when I visited Tokyo, どうもありがとうございます @YOSH :thumbup:) Both of them have a funnel, so maybe Base Camp has them if your stove has lost it.
     
  10. afoton

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  11. Rangie

    Rangie Subscriber

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    I like the filter gauze, it looks as if it is there purely to filter in this application, as opposed to the 1" long rolled-up gauzes used for heat transfer/pulsation damper in lipstick burners.

    It's a nice little outfit :thumbup:
    I went down the make-my-own route but its great to see quality brassware still being produced! :content:

    Alec.
     
  12. YOSH

    YOSH Subscriber

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    Hi @Afterburner

    No problem!
    I’m looking forward to meeting you in Tokyo again:)

    Yoshiya
     
  13. Afterburner

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    Hi @YOSH

    I am also waiting to meet you again! I hope that soon there will be a change to visit Japan again. Last week I was just across the sea in Korea at Seoul & Busan and I thought that it would be nice to take boat/ferry to Japan from Busan, but there was no time for it.
     
  14. YOSH

    YOSH Subscriber

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    Hi @Afterburner,

    I would like to see you in the cherry blossom season in Tokyo!
    It takes about 3 hours from Busan to Fukuoka by Ferry. And it takes about 1.5 hours from Fukuoka to Tokyo by airplane. But it will takes 2 hours from Busan to Narita by airplane.