Metal Work Help Requested

Discussion in 'Fettling Forum' started by BradB, Oct 6, 2019.

  1. BradB

    BradB United States Subscriber

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    29BD4F7C-8A69-44BD-BC52-142459314881.jpeg I recently have been working on a couple Coleman 550B stoves, but my question is not stove specific. On one of the stoves I did not sufficiently tighten the brass fuel/air tube to the valve body when I reassembled it. When I took it apart again the F/A tube stayed in the tank when I removed the valve. Long story short, to get it out I buggered up the F/A tube with a pliers. Now, it screws back together ok but it will not shut off. I can see why, looking inside the tube the surface is marred and the 005 o ring is not sealing fully. The question is how can I resurface the inside of the F/A tube? 95% of it is fine, there is just a tiny nick in the surface. I am guessing a drop of solder with a toothpick? I do have a lathe on my Shopsmith that I could possibly use to turn a smooth surface. I am a wood guy with no metal turning tools. This F/A tube is not available nor is the valve, so I would like to save it if I can. I did have a guy over on CCF offer a valve to me at a quite high price, but I am not that desperate. Any ideas welcome. Brad
     
  2. Marc

    Marc Subscriber

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    Solder might work for dimensional restoration, although a toothpick wouldn't be the tool to use.

    If a F/A tube from a lantern will work, I'll happily send you one.
     
  3. snwcmpr

    snwcmpr Subscriber

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    A proper lathe would be the right way to fix this, but ....

    If that area gets hot, most likely it does, then plain solder may not be the solution.
    You could try a little 'easy' silver solder paste. High enough temp and it is easier to work with.
    High temp JB Weld.

    If it does not get hot, you might be able to set a piece of flux/solder in the area, after cleaning and removing flammable o-rings, and heat it up with a torch. The solder might flow to fill the nick.

    You can sand it while mounted in the drill press or lathe.

    Or patience on a lower price from someone else.
     
  4. HercL4D2

    HercL4D2 Subscriber

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  5. BradB

    BradB United States Subscriber

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    Thanks for the suggestions. I had bought this silver 550B quite cheap in hopes of having a working “spare”. Even though this one smelled of RUG, I heated and shocked the generator and saved it. As I said earlier, then I buggered up the F/A tube. While looking for the F/A tube I found a new unfired copper one that had been banged up. The seller misassembled it to sell and I was the only bidder for under $10. In the selling pics it looked like the generator was ruined, and that was the case. But I also found a new generator/pump kit for less than the going rate, so I ended up with a new stove for about $30. But now I still have the old silver one that still needs the F/A tube. As I now have three of this model that I acquired through the years, all new unfired till I got my pyromaniac hands on them, this fourth one will be gifted to friend or family if I can get it going. I don’t know how hot it is there down in the tank, I think I will try the jb weld route combined with a lathing attempt. Brad
     
  6. BradB

    BradB United States Subscriber

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    As a follow up, the JB Weld extreme temperature repair worked. I dabbed some on the outside damaged threads and the inside gouge. On the outside threads I filed with the edge of a triangular saw file, then ran the thread through a steel nut to help “cut” the thread. On the inside I rolled up a small piece of sandpaper and sanded while turning the tube, held in a lathe. First medium, then fine sandpaper. The stove now turns off and regulates. Hope it holds up. Brad