MEVA Pragus 666

Discussion in 'Stove Forum' started by Robur, May 24, 2019.

  1. Robur Local Intranet

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    Hello guys,
    • what for a fuel should I use for this stove?
    • are there some instructions for using?

    many thanks
    Robur

    IMG_6469.JPG

    IMG_6470.JPG

    IMG_6473.JPG
     
  2. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    Brimstone.


    8]
     
  3. z1ulike

    z1ulike United States SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Alcohol is the fuel you should use.

    Ben
     
  4. Jeremy Belgrave-Lock

    Jeremy Belgrave-Lock United Kingdom Subscriber

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    @Robur

    I want one! What a lovely stove.

    Please can you show some flame shots when you have it running.

    Regards Jeremy
     
  5. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    @Robur
    Method of use is the simplest but your stove is missing a crucial component, a priming cup that should be screwed into position immediately under the burner mixing chamber where the single self-tapped screw hole for the fixing screw is visible.

    ‘Priming’ consists of releasing sufficient fuel into the priming cup by unscrewing the control valve a little, then screwing it shut and igniting the priming fuel charge.

    When the priming fuel is very nearly used up, opening the control valve will release vapourised fuel to the burner, and the gas will be ignited by the residue of the priming charge flame.

    Control the burner between maximum and simmer by slightly unscrewing the control anti-clockwise or screwing clockwise to reduce and shut down the flame.

    John
     
  6. Radler Switzerland

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    @presscall
    On the first picture it seems to me, the (very large) priming cup is visible.
    A very nice and old stove!

    Radler
     
  7. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    You’re right, I see it now. I merely saw its absence in the last photo where Robur had evidently removed it to photograph the underside of the burner.

    John
     
  8. Simes

    Simes Subscriber

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    Seems to be missing in the third pic for the photo shoot, the below shot. The Turm 38 has a larger than necessary priming pan in my opinion, size seems to be for cosmetic rather than practical reasons.

    Edit. Beat me to it John
     
  9. Radler Switzerland

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    @Simes
    Study where the fuel for priming comes from, where the valve is, and where the fuel flows to, when the valve is opened. Then you understand, why the cup has this size.

    @Robur
    This is a gravity operated stove. If the valve is open or leaking, all fuel can flow out on the table. As well, when the flames are blown out by the wind. This is a danger with this type of stove, so be aware of it.

    Best regards
    Radler
     
  10. gieorgijewski

    gieorgijewski Subscriber

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  11. Radler Switzerland

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    @gieorgijewski
    Great service! I expected, you will find something like this. :clap:

    Best Regards
    Radler
     
  12. Robur Local Intranet

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    Hello guys,

    many thanks for your great advices!!!
    And the scheme, even in chzech, wooow, great!!!
    At first I was terrified that is some important component is missing, but in fact the priming cup is here. I have it removed just to photograph the stove from the bottom.

    I will post here some photos after testing. Now I have just to buy some spirits.
    best regards and thanks again to you all!!
    Glad to know about you!
     
  13. Robur Local Intranet

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    IMG_6523.JPG

    IMG_6529.JPG

    it works perfect!
    Just one small problem, the leak on the fuel tank. I can use just the lower half of the tank and cannot transport the stove with the fuel in the tank.
     
  14. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    @Robur
    A soldered repair should be possible.
    • Remove the fuel tank
    • Remove the filler cap
    • Wash out the tank thoroughly with soap and water
    • Polish the area of the crack/split and apply flux
    • Use soft (what used to be lead) solder
    • Mount the tank in some way that it won’t move during soldering - you could screw it back onto the stove riser tube - and arrange the workpiece so that the area to repair is uppermost and accessible
    • Get some water wet tissues folded into strips and drape them all over the tank except for the area you’re working on. These ensure that the heat of the blowtorch doesn’t unsolder tank seams or mounting bosses
    • Use a blowtorch to heat the repair area and apply solder. It should flow into the crack and a little of the surrounding area
    • When the solder is molten I use thin strip of tinplate (a pressure stove pricker handle is ideal) to flick off excess solder
    Test the repair for leakage (fuel in the tank) and if the repair was successful, polish the repaired area and tank.

    John
     
  15. Simes

    Simes Subscriber

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    Great photos there @Robur, and great advice from John as usual.

    I would only add as we're unsure of your soldering skills that if you haven't done much for a while I would suggest a small test piece before trying the repair. The small 'pencil' blowtorches should be adequate and the heat controlled to a small area.