MSR XGK II Shaker Jet Stove, 2001

Discussion in 'MSR - Mountain Safety Research' started by SNOWGOOSE, Oct 17, 2011.

  1. SNOWGOOSE

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    Let us start with a flame shot from this 2001 MSR X-GK II shaker jet stove running on paraffin:

    1318879644-R0020338A_opt_1_.jpg

    This MSR X-GK II shaker jet stove manufactured in 2001 evolved from the Penberthy designed Model 9 stove for which he applied for a patent on April 26 1974.

    The Abstract from the original patent application states: ” Disclosed is a portable stove for burning various hydrocarbon fuels including a burner assembly, a fuel tank, a housing which carries an air pump and a fuel valve and which is releasably secured to the open neck of a fuel container, and a fuel tube which interconnects a burner assembly and the pump housing. The fuel tube locates the air pump, fuel valve and fuel tank remotely from the burner assembly for safety and ease of adjustment of the fuel valve. The air pump housing constitutes the closure for the fuel tank and an empty fuel tank is replaceable simply by unthreading it from the pump housing and threading thereto a full fuel tank. The fuel tube is releasably secured to the pump housing by a pivoted lever which prevents separating movement of the fuel tube and pump housing.”

    Aside from the flint starter and other, minor points,the shaker jet the MSR X-GK II is very similar to the original.

    Within the descriptive text of the original patent application is this: “Ready and quick assembly and disassembly of the stove is particularly important in the environment in which the present stove is contemplated for use, i.e., mountain climbing, wherein the stove unit necessarily must be broken down into compact elements for back-packing and must be capable of being disassembled and reassembled with minimal dexterity.”
    This description aptly describes all the models from the 9 to the current day MSR XGK Expedition.
    At the end of this piece I will give links to the patents for those that are interested and I intend putting pdf’s of those patents in the Stove Literature Reference Library.

    Before I get to the photographs of my MSR X-GK II stove here is the drawing of the original Model 9:

    1318879825-MSR_MODEL_9_opt.jpg

    And for comparison here is a drawing of the model that I have :

    1318879893-MSR_XGK_II_opt.jpg

    In the hiking and mountaineering literature one will read comments to the effect that the XGK is a loud stove. e.g. “The XGK has a roarer burner (and does it roar!)" Although I do not possess the means of measuring sound, my anecdotal evidence would suggest that the XGK is no louder than a Classic 1 pint roarer such as an Optimus 00, Primus 210 etc.

    In Harvey Penberthy Backpacker’s Stove patent application he said, and it is worth reiterating : “Ready and quick assembly and disassembly of the stove is particularly important in the environment in which the present stove is contemplated for use, i.e., mountain climbing”

    I would add that this sentiment is also one that every ski mountaineer or winter backpacker would endorse. For thirteen years in the eighties and nineties my MSR stove (not this model) enabled me to get a brew on with minimum fuss. When you are cold after a hard day skiing in demanding terrain, a simple to assembly stove is of paramount importance.

    The MSR X-GK II is a stove of few parts and can be assembled and disassembled with remarkable ease. Stripping this stove down to its component parts is child’s play. Only a screwdriver (or the MSR Jet & Cable Tool) is required to remove the jet. Other than that it all comes apart without tools.

    This stove, only weighing 260 grams without the pump together with the MSR Trillium base (70 grams) enabled the mountaineer to set up and melt snow for brews and cooking in the most demanding of environments providing on also used the aluminium heat reflector and windscreen – a mere 45 grams weight.

    However, For winter mountaineering , both for snow melting and for cooking, a far superior stove was conceived by Gunnar Finn, the Swedish mountaineer whose company, Kiruna Arctic Products produced what became to be known as the KAP ARCTIC. See the following post by Aktopp:

    https://classiccampstoves.com/threads/14736

    For those interested in what is probably the ultimate Kap Arctic see what ArcticFlame has achieved here:


    https://classiccampstoves.com/threads/16247


    Now, back to the MSR X-GK:

    Here is the stove:

    1318880064-R0020267A_opt.jpg

    The date is stamped into the aluminium mounting block, 0101 = January 2001:

    1318880140-R0020264A_opt.jpg

    A closer look at the burner unit and pan supports:

    1318880169-R0020270A_opt.jpg

    The stove has essentially five parts that can be disassembled for carrying ( I have removed the priming pad for this photo).

    1318880212-R0020280A_opt.jpg

    This photo shows essentially the same components with the addition of the folding MSR Trillium base:

    1318880244-R0020283A_opt.jpg

    Stove mounted on MSR Trillium base:

    1318880275-R0020285A_opt.jpg

    Here is the MSR XGK inside the simple but effective cocoon of aluminum windshield and heat reflector:

    1318880310-R0020292A_opt.jpg

    This XGK II is the “shaker Jet” model.
    The abstract from the patent states:

    “An apparatus and method for cleaning a fuel delivery system contained within a lightweight, portable, liquid fuel component stove comprising a weighted needle contained within a fuel transmission chamber wherein shaking the chamber causes a cleaning end of the weighted needle to move in and out of an orifice in the chamber, so that the orifice is cleaned and fuel may be effectively transmitted from a fuel source through the orifice and to a burner.”


    In the patent description we find the following statement:

    “It is common in the field of lightweight, portable, component, liquid fuel stoves suitable for backpacking, to have clogging problems with the orifice that delivers fuel from the fuel line or other fuel system to the burner. The clogging may be caused by a build up from the fuel itself, such as coke formation, or the clogging may be caused by dirt or other extraneous material in the fuel or environment.”

    And later we read:

    “The present invention is directed towards a weighted needle for cleaning the fuel orifice of a lightweight, portable, liquid fuel component stove. The use of such a cleaning needle in conjunction with a component stove is advantageous because the weighted needle is located within a chamber leading to the fuel orifice, and therefore removes the need for any external seals, cranks, or other secondary structures. Further, the burner assembly of the component stove can be detached from the fuel container either before or after cleaning. Cleaning is highly preferably performed by shaking the burner assembly when it is detached from the fuel container because the burner assembly is a more convenient size and weight for shaking than an entire stove, and this reduces the possibility of spilling fuel. Further, in order to obtain full cleaning of the orifice, it is often necessary to "rap" the burner assembly, upside-down, sharply on a solid surface. The "rap" thus generates enough velocity in the weighted needle to push through the carbon build-up. With a large appliance or a stove with an attached fuel container, it can be difficult to "rap" the burner assembly without damaging the appliance and/or causing fuel leakage. Further, with a lantern such a "rap" can easily cause the fragile mantle(s) to break.

    The use of the weighted needle for cleaning the fuel orifice is also particularly advantageous with the use of liquid fuels, as "dirty" liquid fuels are often the only fuels available in remote areas and foreign lands, thereby dramatically increasing the need to clean the fuel orifice. The weighted needle is further particularly advantageous for use with component stoves having a separated burner assembly and fuel tank because the weighted needle is typically maintained in a vertical chamber to take advantage of the effects of gravity to remove the needle from the cleaned orifice when not in use, and such a chamber is typically located below the burner itself. Thus, where the fuel container is located below the burner assembly, the burner assembly can become fairly tall and the stability of the stove can be reduced.”


    In my opinion the “shaker jet”, or more correctly the “weighted needle” is entirely superfluous. The “shaker” can NOT be used whilst the stove is in use! Much better to use a conventional “pricker”.

    Furthermore, the “shaker jets”, at the time of writing (October 17 2011) are £6.00 and the weighted needle is a further £3.50….whereas by substituting the non-shaker jet it will only cost £3.50 for the G jet (MSR part No 419250 and £3.20 for the K jet (MSR part No 419251).

    The “shaker “ jet is also a compromise, as the same jet the GK-jet (MSR part No 419266) is for petrol and paraffin. The other “shaker jet” for the XGK II is the X-jet (MSR part No 419267) which is used for diesel fuel.

    So, if you have a MSR XGK II shaker jet stove, throw away your shaker jet and needle and get a bunch of these non-shaker jets:

    1318880493-R0020258A_opt.jpg


    Some people have said that their “shaker jet XGK II” does not perform as well as their non-shaker jet model…..so….. just change the jet to the non-shaker type.

    All the component parts for the XGK II stove are available for sale separately in specialist climbing and mountaineering shops…not in your average walking/camping/outdoor shops. I’m referring here to parts availability in Great Britain in October 2011. I have no knowledge of part availability in other countries.

    The parts available are as follows:

    XGK Panwire Assembly (msr 319432)
    Older XGKs had swinging pan support arms. They are easily replaced with crossed panwires as on more recent models. (Not EX)

    XGK/XGK II Fuel Line Assembly (msr 419254)
    This is the rigid steel tube fuel line. Fits all XGK models except the EX. Includes cut cable, jet and shaker needle.

    XGK Cut Cable Shaker (msr 419255) Cut Cable means the wire cleaning cable that lives in the fuel line.This cable is 39cm long and about 4mm thick.

    XGK Flame Spreader (msr 419264)
    This item is identical to the DF Flame Spreader (msr 419804) and is what is available in GB.

    XGK Expedition GK-Jet (msr 419266)
    Petrol/Parafin Jet, shaker needle not included. This is the best jet for modern XGKs (except the new EX model) - fits all shaker jet models. All jets can be identified by the letters stamped in the top.

    XGK Expedition X-Jet (msr 419267)
    Diesel Jet, shaker needle not included.

    Shaker Needleweight Assembly (msr 419618)
    Fits all shaker stoves (can NOT be retro-fitted to older stoves without fitting a whole new fuel pipe assembly). Needle only, no jet.

    XGK G-Jet Non-Shaker (msr 419250)
    Petrol Jet for older non-shaker jet models.

    XGK K-Jet Non-Shaker (msr 419251)
    Parafin Jet for older non-shaker jet models

    XGK Priming Pad (msr 419223) This is the “correct” pad for this stove, the pad is square. I use the round priming pad, meant for the latest EX model: XGK EX Priming Pad (msr 417212) .

    Catch Arm (includes Retaining Ring) (msr 419220)
    This is the wire arm that holds the pump in place. Comes with retaining ring.

    The XGK stove was meant as a basic stove, easily assembled and disassembled and easy to maintain in the field. It was not meant for fancy cooking or simmering which it does poorly. One can “simmer”….sort of ….and I would NOT call this simmering.

    One can adjust the power via the fuel valve but you have to be careful when using the spreader plate as yellow tips to the flame will appear denoting incomplete combustion and thus higher CO.

    Much better to use a Gary Adams four hole cap where one can achieve phenomenal heat output AND a more adjustable flame via the valve on the pump. Here is a photo of the MSR XGK II shaker jet stove using the K jet with paraffin and utilising a Gary Adams Midi-Cap:

    1318880611-R0020324A_opt.jpg

    Much has been written within the CCS forums on the various pumps that have been supplied with the different model stoves. Prior to the 1980’s the pump shaft was metal. For collectors the type of pump may be important. I am not a collector, I am a stove user and for me there is only one game ion town and that is the current model, the MSR Duraseal pump and thaty is what I use.

    Here is a drawing of this pump showing its component parts:

    1318880653-MSR_DURASEAL_PUMP_opt.jpg

    In Great Britain, All the component parts for the Duraseal pump are available for sale separately in specialist climbing and mountaineering shops:

    Duraseal Pump Cup Washer Rubber (MSR Part 418823)
    This is the rubber washer as fitted to the new Duraseal Pump

    New Fuel Pump Control Valve Assembly (Standard) (msr 418803)
    For XGK and Whisperlite. This is for the new (Duraseal) pump.

    Duraseal Fuel Pump Control Valve O-Ring Red (DF & Std) (msr 418814)
    This is the control valve O-Ring for the new Duraseal pumps.
    The standard pump just requires this, but the Dragon Fly pump requires both this and the Flame Adjuster O Ring (418147).

    Fuel Pump Seal Duraseal (msr 418831)
    This is the ring that seals the end of the new Duraseal Pumps at the point where the pump screws onto the fuel bottle.

    Duraseal Fuel Pump Check Valve Assembly (DF & Std) (msr 418824) For modern Duraseal Pumps.
    There are two types – one has a “dome” shaped pip and the other is conventionally shaped. Either can be used.

    Fuel Pump Pick Up Tube with Filter (msr 418066)


    For those that may be interested the original model 9 stove invented by Harvey Penberthy the patent details are as follows:
    Patent number: 3900281
    Filing date: Apr 26, 1974
    Issue date: Aug 1, 1975

    Harvey Penberthy Backpacker’s Stove patent application with five drawings can be found here: http://www.google.com/patents?id=a8...Q6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=US Patent 3900281&f=false

    A descriptive abstract can be found here:

    http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-...&f=G&l=50&d=PALL&RefSrch=yes&Query=PN/3900281

    With regard to the adaptation of the shaker jet details are as follows:

    Patent number: 5513624
    Filing date: Jun 29, 1994
    Issue date: May 7, 1996

    The patent application together with three drawings can be found here:

    http://www.google.com/patents?id=tD...AEwADgK#v=onepage&q=US Patent 3900281&f=false

    A descriptive abstract can be found here:

    http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-...&f=G&l=50&d=PALL&RefSrch=yes&Query=PN/5513624
     
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  2. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner SotY Winner Subscriber

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    Well done Rob, that pretty much constitutes the definitive account of the XGK II in my book - especially for someone who declares himself to be a "... stove user, not a collector"!

    John
     
  3. SNOWGOOSE

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    :lol:
     
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  4. hikin_jim

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    Quite the compendium, Rob! Thank you for taking the time to pull all of that together.

    It still seems odd to me that MSR advises one to use the "G" jet for gasoline and kerosene and that the "K" jet should be used for diesel. :-k

    HJ
     
  5. SNOWGOOSE

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    The X jet MSR advise for diesel not the K jet....as there was no K jet for the XGK II Shaker model,not in Great Britain anyway.

    The "shaker" model XGK II were supplied with TWO jets the GK jet and the X jet in Great Britain.

    The older model XGK II that had the G jet and the K jet.

    Use the old G & K jets in the shaker model and throw away the needle!!!

    Cheers,

    Rob
     
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  6. hikin_jim

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    Thank you, Rob. Yes, you're right. On newer XGK models, there was no "K" jet. There is still a "K" jet on the Whisperlite Internationale, Whisperlite Universal, and I believe the Dragonfly.

    By the way, Penberthy normally went by his middle name. I didn't even know his first name was Harvey until I saw this post!

    HJ
     
  7. SNOWGOOSE

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    Hi HJ,

    Yes, I know there are many references to Harvey Larry Penberthy shortened to Larry Penberthy in the literature.

    Searching the literature, particularly his many patents, (and the stove was just one of many) his patent applications always had his name in the order Harry Larry Penberthy and that is why I referred to him that way.

    I didn’t start to use MSR stoves until 1984 and of course he was long gone from MSR then. REI bought MSR in 1981 as you will know.

    Cheers,

    Rob
     
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  8. hikin_jim

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    Penberthy was a very interesting man. An engineer by trade with a climber's avocation. He was extremely dissatisfied with the quality of the climbing gear available -- so he designed his own. His famous Model 9 stove of course, but also helmet, ice axes, carabiners, pickets, etc.

    But he designed not only climbing equipment. One of his most intriguing inventions is a method to encase radioactive waste in leaded glass!

    Penberthy was one of those rare men whose talents were quite broad.

    HJ
     
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  9. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Hi, Rob,

    FANTASTIC job in collecting and offering all that information here, Mate!! VERY well done, and my hat is off to you! :clap: :clap: :thumbup: :D :D Thanks, again, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc
     
  10. RonPH

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    Welcome back Doc, when did you get back?

    Ron
     
  11. wedgie

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    where do you order your spare's from in the uk?
     
  12. SNOWGOOSE

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    Wedgie asked "where do you order your spare's from in the uk?"

    There are several places..here is a good one with fast and reliable service: www.needlesports.com
     
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  13. teletim

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    What size pricker Rob?
     
  14. SNOWGOOSE

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    Hi Tim,

    The MSR pricker is 0.2mm

    Cheers,

    Rob