My Primus 8R

Discussion in 'Primus No:8R' started by janthenat, Feb 9, 2019.

  1. janthenat United States

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    I received my 8R from a coworker in Denver in 1993. I believe he purchased it new, and used it for years before generously passing it along to me. I’ve used it off and on since then. It has always been reliable and convenient. I’m hoping to pass it on to one of my sons someday... when I’m done with it of course.

    Guess I ought to clean it up sometime ;^)

    Any guess on the year based on the sticker? I have no idea.

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  2. OMC

    OMC Subscriber

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    welcome jan,
    You believe he purchased it new...
    That and, it seems to me, the parts are all original and good to mention the small "Primus" sticker :thumbup: (prior version Primus8R sticker was slightly larger, otherwise same).
    re: "Any guess on the year " ?
    It is c1971.
    Nice stove, i'm +1 on reliable & convenient.
    Oh btw, I know nowhere does ity say Optimus... FYI, it is a Primus 8R made by Optimus and aside from the label and knob it is identical to c1971 Optimus 8R.
    thanks for posting neighbor, omc
     
  3. Alan Erickson United States

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    Hello from New Mexico (an odd name for such a beautiful place since we are neither new nor Mexican),

    Your stove looks just like mine did when I bought it at a yard sale 20 years ago. The guy had two for sale: the as-new Primus 8R I bought for $5, and a beat-up, high-mileage 1980's Coleman pumper for $35. I passed on the second one having become familiar with it in my youth. I remember whispering, "I cannot believe this is five bucks" to my wife as I pulled out a five and handed it to him, and he said, "Just be real careful with that thing, man, you know how to light them?" Suddenly it was clear to me: priming a self-pressured stove was beyond his technical ability. He probably singed his bangs or pony tail in the 70's and never lit it since. Well...that's why Coleman has done so well over the years. Sure, the pump is almost certain to wear out, possibly atop a mountain, but it works just like the stove in his kitchen.
    I have owned a Svea123 and was able to assure him I knew how to light a fricken stove, and have been in love with the 8R ever since. I think the vintage we own (mine is also a '71) is the best; old-school
    quality with the "latest" features of built-in cleaning needle and burn-proof knob. If you've never committed the sin of leaving that cursed sardine can key on the valve while the stove is lit, you might not appreciate the clunky-looking knob, but trust me, it's a good thing.
    One of my favorite things, beyond the sustainability that is unlike anything sold today and probably put Primus and Optimus out of business, is how well they do at altitude. I don't know why, since alcohol stoves are nearly useless up here and my 2-stroke motors have all lost a noticeable amount of power compared to their sea-level selves. But the Primus never seemed to notice! In New England, 4,000 feet was a very tall mountain. We are at 5,500 and often go up another 1,000 from here. When we first got here, that 8R was the only kitchen we had, and it never let us down, percolating full-size coffee pots and boiling full-size pots of water in very reasonable ammounts of time and fuel consumption.
    My only regret is that the miles are starting to show. Eventually, the paint started to bubble off, and I stripped what was left and hit it with cheap, black stove paint. I miss the metallic blue that looked like a Thunderbird, and the stove paint hasn't lived up to its promises of heat resistance. Maybe it's the exposure to gas. Or maybe I should try again with Rustoleum. Either way, enjoy the blue paint and decal while it lasts.
    One last thing: remember the 90's? Or the theme song from "King of the Hill"? Primus is a pretty good band. It wouldn't surprise me if they liked camp cooking.
     
  4. Macaroon

    Macaroon United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Interesting and thoughtful post:thumbup:
    Welcome by the way!
     
  5. Alan Erickson United States

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    She's got some miles, but she's always ready to dance and has had NO surgery...

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  6. janthenat United States

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    Just to clarify, I’m a Joe not a Jan... not that there’s any way you could have known that. Maybe I should have used a different name when I signed up. ;^)
     
  7. janthenat United States

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    I just found a bottle of Brasso in my stash of paints and sundries... time to make this thing shine again.

    Any tips on cleanup?
     
  8. snwcmpr

    snwcmpr Subscriber

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    I would suggest that you NOT use Brasso. Brasso contains ammonia. Ammonia is not good to use on a brass pressure vessel. It can result in cracks.
    Autosol is said to be a good product. I myself do not polish.