Newbie questions (unfortunately)

Discussion in 'Stove Forum' started by Bob hastie, Oct 7, 2020.

  1. Bob hastie United Kingdom

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    Hi all, I'm sorry for the newbie questions im about to ask, I did have a search about on the forum with limited success
    I've got a primus no5 which I inherited from my dad, it's sat in an old biscuit tin in the shed for a few years now but I've got to a point where I have a use for it.
    Firstly the leather pump washer seems to be knackered, from what I've read in here it requires the large leather cup, is that correct?
    Is there any way of testing the nrv without the pump working?
    There were 2 odd shaped pieces of metal in the stove body, I'm assuming they were left over from manufacturing, or do they have a purpose I can't fathom (see pictures)
    Thanks in advance
    Bob
     

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  2. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

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    @Bob hastie

    Welcome. There’s no problem asking questions here.

    1. You’re pump leather looks ok to me, unless there’s a split that’s not shown in the photo. Soak it in neatsfoot oil, or engine oil if you don’t have the neatsfoot. Splay it a little and ease it back into the pump tube. A pump cup and other seals and washers can me ordered from The Fettlebox.

    2. Those odd bits of metal are odd - don’t look stove related to me.

    3. Without the pump, on a stove like this, it’s difficult to test the NRV properly.

    Cheers

    Tony
     
  3. nmp

    nmp United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    @Bob hastie I

    It looks to me as though someone has had a go at resoldering the riser tube into the tank judging by the blobs of solder around the riser, those bits in the tank could be solder that’s dripped down from there into the tank?
    Watch out in that area when you pressurise the tank for white smoke or a flame indicating a leak at the joint.
    Cheers Nick
     
  4. Bob hastie United Kingdom

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    Thanks @Tony Press
    I'll pop next door and beg a bit of neatsfoot from my horsey neighbour

    @nmp it does look a bit amateur now you mention it
    I'll test it with a spray of soapy water once I get the pump sorted. May need to do a bit of research into re-soldering them
     
  5. Robert Radcliffe

    Robert Radcliffe United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    @Bob hastie
    I'd strongly recommend replacing the fuel cap and NRV washers. To service the NRV would require investing in a removal tool or possibly making one.
    If you don't want to go that far then after soaking the pump leather as @Tony Press suggested pressurise the stove and search for leaks as @nmp wisely recommended.
     
  6. Bob hastie United Kingdom

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    @Robert Radcliffe
    Thanks for the advise
    I'll do a bit of research into nrv removal and servicing
     
  7. snwcmpr

    snwcmpr SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Welcome to CCS.
    Questions are welcome and pictures are loved.

    Just to state the obvious.
    You know this is a kerosene stove, paraffin, NOT petrol, gasoline, right?
     
  8. Bob hastie United Kingdom

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    @snwcmpr
    Thanks for the warning, and yes I do
    I used pressure paraffin stoves when camping as a kid, but that was 40 years ago now. The memory is about blurry on the details of using them.
    Fuel is one thing I've been researching tonight, living on a Scottish island means we don't always have access to buy what most people would consider commonplace. I think the easiest to obtain replacement for me will be 28 sec. heating oil
     
  9. snwcmpr

    snwcmpr SotM Winner Subscriber

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  10. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Hi @Bob hastie . 28 sec heating oil works just fine and is a lot cheaper then pre-packaged paraffin.

    Some pressure stove operating instructions to remind you:

    Stove Lighting instructions

    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
  11. Bob hastie United Kingdom

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    @kerophile
    Thanks, that's what I'd read last night, looks like I'll be begging a couple of pints from my neighbours oil tank.
    Btw, in an emergency does diesel work?
     
  12. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Only if it is a matter of life or death...

    It takes a lot of pre-heat to vaporise diesel in a standard burner, then incomplete combustion in use quickly chokes the burner with gum and carbon.

    And it Stinks....

    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
  13. Bob hastie United Kingdom

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    @kerophile
    Thanks for that, I'll steer clear of diesel I think
     
  14. aomb30

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    I don't believe a re-solder was attempted. The beading around the riser tube in your first picture suggests to me the stove has been over heated and solder in that location melted with a portion dripping into the tank where you found it.
     
  15. Bob hastie United Kingdom

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    @aomb30
    Interssting, I hadn't considered that, luckily there seems to be no air leaks anywhere.
    Out of interest, what could cause such an overheat? Just so I know what to avoid
     
  16. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

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    @Bob hastie

    Enclosing the stove in a box, tin or with a windscreen, and not allowing the escape of heat that will be reflected downwards from the pot is a common cause of melting solder at the riser joint in the tank.

    Cheers

    Tony
     
  17. Bob hastie United Kingdom

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    So after soaking the pump leather in light oil overnight I teased it out slightly and found it works fine.
    I pumped it a few times and do a leak test with some soapy water, all seemed fine.
    After adding a bit of kerosene I fired it up and all went perfectly, I always love it when something as old as this (1938) works so easily after not being used for a couple decade or more
    Thanks so much for all the comments and advise
     

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  18. ROBBO55

    ROBBO55 Subscriber

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    Congratulations @Bob hastie , the flame colour looks good :thumbup: . A nice piece of family history.