NRV Questions

Discussion in 'Stove Forum' started by FOGWOLF, Feb 19, 2020.

  1. FOGWOLF

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    Hello E.S.S. (Esteemed Stove Surgeons!)

    I have 3 Kero burners that I have been given over the years, and it time to get them going.

    1) Optimus No. 5 with a gimbal.

    2) Optimus 00

    3) Optimus 535 Twin burner.

    My Plan was to refurbish the NRVs, the pump cups, and the filler cap seals. Rinse the tanks with Acetone. Add fresh Kerosene, then pre-heat with meths. Light them up and run like hell for 10 minutes.

    I have a couple of questions..

    Doe that sound like a sound plan?
    Are the NRVs the same for all of these stoves, are they interchangeable?
    Is there a difference between Kerosene and Paraffin?

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

    Best Regards,
    FOGWOLF
     
  2. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    My advice would be to run like hell for only 5 minutes, then turn around and run back to see how they are doing.

    Welcome to CCS!

    There is no difference between Kerosene and Paraffin. Useful advice will be forthcoming, I do not doubt....
     
  3. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

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    Welcome, Mr Wolf

    That sounds like a rational plan.

    The NRVs are interchangeable. Be careful extracting them. Give them a soak in penetrating oil if they are stuck. Use a good tool. [There is plenty of discussion about NRV extraction on this site].

    Parts for the NRVs are available from The Fettlebox (link on this site).

    You will need a pricker to clear the jet in the nipple of each stove.

    Paraffin is British for kerosene.

    No need to run.


    Cheers

    Tony

    @FOGWOLF
     
  4. Ray123

    Ray123 Subscriber

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    If you rinse the tank with acetone you should do that before refurbishing the seals and nrv pips. Viton and acetone aren't very compatible.

    NRV's are interchangeable. You'll need a special wrench to get them out but then you can easily open them up and replace the rubber pip with a viton pip. If you Optimus stoves are newer models you'll also need some brass pip holders. Fettlebox can square you away. NRV kit.
     
  5. Simes

    Simes Subscriber

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    I'll have to look for the fettling rules list, but high on my list would be if it ain't broke you will if you try to fix it.

    Rinse the fount with fresh kero, you can pass this through a coffee filter if you want to use again, as above acetone will be a little too agressive for old seals.

    Poke a small.wire down into the NRV and see if there is free travel in the valve. Old bike spoke works. It won't prove the seal but may save some grief later.

    Now check the pump works. If the leather is a little dry an ivernight soak in light oil and a nice massage may breathe a little more life into it, or at least enough for a test run.

    Try a few stokes and you will hopefully feel the valve working and air entering the fount, at least a bit of pressure until the NRV spring gives.

    Poke the seal in the fill cap with something pointy to see if the seal needs replacing, if you still have a bit of give you may be in luck and can wait for seal kits to arrive while cooking.

    With your handy pricker ensure the nipple.is clear.

    You can now fill with a small amount of kero to test. Prime with Meths(ethanol) and off you go.

    At least that's the way I treat new to me stoves. A shakedown run can be entertaining so don't do this indoors or when you have witnesses.

    Pop a bit of kero in the fount
     
  6. Twoberth

    Twoberth United Kingdom Subscriber

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    I do exactly the same as Simes, except I deal with the pump leather first. I don’t soak it overnight, I just massage it for a few minutes with oil and then soak it until I need to put it back.

    So:
    Rinse tank - kerosene
    Pump leather -oil
    NRV - bike spoke
    Filler washer - awl
    Jet -pricker
    Pressure check - thumb over filler cap
    Leak check - water dunk.
    Test fire - outside
     
  7. FOGWOLF

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    Drs,

    Thanks for the advice!

    I had to have a go at the No. 5 when i got home from work, and a scout canoe trip planning meeting.

    Drained the tank oiled the cup an worked it a bit. Nrv stiff, so removed it.

    No washer! Installed New pip And a lead washer I had purchased from Fettlebox 4 years ago! Along with the nrv tool!!



    Added kerosine ,Filled primer with meths. Lit it ,and let it burn. (Outside) Tightened the vent screw opened the regulator to far left to clear the jet a few times, then back to just opened, and hit it with a spark. It fired right up with a blue flame out of the silent burner holes!!!

    Pumping was a bit stiff, will rebuild the nrv and see if that helps.

    One down, two to go!

    Will post pics soon!

    Thank you all for the advice , it was motivating, and much appreciated!
     
  8. Jim Lukowski United States

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    Just as an FYI, if you're reading paraffin on this site, I think it's safe to say that it's referencing kerosene. However, you're in the US and paraffin in the US is liquid candle wax. Although it'll burn, it's more for small wickie lanterns and not appropriate for a kerosene stove.
     
  9. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    I would say that 'paraffin' in the US is a wax which is solid and translucent-to-opaque white at room temperatures. One of its main uses historically was sealing jars of home-canned fruits and vegetables.

    It was an everyday feature of life when I was growing up, but probably is not so anymore with the decline in home canning.
     
  10. Jim Lukowski United States

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    @Ed Winskill

    Ed,

    You're not wrong, but I'm guessing you mean stuff like Gulf Wax which comes in bars. I'm talking about the lamp oil you can buy that won't soot or have an odor. Unfortunately, it's also called liquid paraffin. This stuff is harder to find, expensive compared to regular lamp oil, and is for small wick lanterns. It's the same stuff used in the disposable liquid candles.
     
  11. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    I have also never heard anything good about that lamp oil in our kero stoves.
     
  12. BradB

    BradB United States Subscriber

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    I use the lamp oil in my Dietz wick lanterns. It burns clean and with little odor. Even good k1 burns with odor in the Dietz lanterns. I would not use it in a pressure stove.