Ogonek - dates from 1988

Discussion in 'Russia' started by presscall, Dec 9, 2015.

  1. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner SotY Winner Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Messages:
    10,817
    Location:
    Lancashire, United Kingdom
    I have the instruction manual for this, in Russian, and there's a 1988 date stamp in it, so I'm supposing that's the date of manufacture.

    I'm most impressed with the quality and robustness of the parts - with one exception, which I'll explain in a moment

    image.jpg


    Here's the wick, a cotton gauze wound on a brass wire armature and shielded by a fine-mesh brass gauze sheath within the burner riser tube

    image.jpg


    I'm getting to the issue that wasn't quite right, concerning the safety release valve in the fuel filler cap

    image.jpg


    A combination of a coil-bound spring with the thickness of valve 'pip' installed meant that when the valve was assembled at the factory the valve action was immovable and the 'pip' was jammed hard against the valve seat, with this effect

    image.jpg


    Choice of a thinner material for the 'pip' restored safety release valve function

    image.jpg

    image.jpg

    image.jpg


    Control spindle and pricker pinion

    image.jpg


    Not graphite packing but what I can only describe as a tough vulcanised rubber, which evidently copes with the heat in this application. It makes a seal very well indeed and the packing nut doesn't need to be tightened as much as is the case with graphite to make a seal so the spindle turns very freely

    image.jpg


    Re-assembled and ready to fire up ...

    image.jpg


    ... once this component has been installed, a twin-walled heatshield having a stainless steel upper surface ...

    image.jpg


    ... And a mild steel plate reverse side, with what I assume is woven asbestos material sandwiched in-between

    image.jpg


    It simply slots into place on a raised lip inside the windshield, just below the pot rests

    image.jpg

    image.jpg


    Iani offered a translation HERE

    image.jpg


    I've an MSR Firefly, said to be one of the loudest stoves. This one comes close.

    image.jpg

    image.jpg


    It's capable of an excellent simmer nevertheless

    image.jpg


    The safety release valve fault which meant there was no working SRV was pretty bad, but with that rectified the Ogonek gets my vote as an excellent stove.

    John
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2015
  2. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2013
    Messages:
    7,728
    Location:
    Stinkpot Bay, Howden, Tasmania, Australia
    Very, very nice! :thumbup:
     
  3. Robert Bruce

    Robert Bruce SotM Winner Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2007
    Messages:
    1,591
    Location:
    Springrange NSW Australia
    What a unusual stove John, great restoration, we'll done.

    Cheers
    Rob
     
  4. shagratork

    shagratork United Kingdom Moderator, R.I.P. Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2005
    Messages:
    9,637
    Location:
    Durham, N.E. England
    A very nice, well made small stove.
    The main thing I find interesting on the stove is the excellent triple layered heat shield.
    I am also impressed with the burn and its simmering properties.
     
  5. gieorgijewski

    gieorgijewski Subscriber

    Online
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2013
    Messages:
    2,714
    Sometimes i am using two examples...
    And - i really dont need "to know what is inside".
    heatshield - is usual not neded to proper work
     
  6. Rangie

    Rangie Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2012
    Messages:
    1,625
    Location:
    Caithness, Far North of Scotland
    They are excellent stoves. They get up to power quickly and have a lovely simmer.

    No requirements for a mini-pump here, by gum it belts out the heat (better than a 123 I would say!)

    The heatshield is a good addition, i've not run tank temperature checks with/without the shield yet but I bet it makes a heck of a difference on full-pelt.

    Alec.
     
  7. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner SotY Winner Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Messages:
    10,817
    Location:
    Lancashire, United Kingdom
    @gieorgijewski
    Sorry if I offended you. It's true, some people are squeamish to see 'innards'.

    Personally, I find it helps to service a stove if I dismantle it , at least to some extent ...

    In the case of this Oganek I'd not have found the 'SRV that wasn't' if I hadn't. I'm rather glad I did, but if I picture a stove dismantled here on CCS again, Gieorgi, I'll give you due warning first.

    John
     
  8. gieorgijewski

    gieorgijewski Subscriber

    Online
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2013
    Messages:
    2,714
    its misunderstanding
    :)
    ...- i really dont need "to know what is inside" - to use them, anytime @ everywhere...
    Its mean - material and construction - is "just for normal use".
    Or - I never need to dismounting them, because they allways working.

    Russians clone - was mostly good - i never see perforated steel tank. Shmel pump oring makes me nervous - but I can made them.
    From my country perspective - they are passe because they are "made in CCCP" - but for me - they are too good, too cheap, too many examples.
    Its a silly questions - how many Shmell 4 is enaugh to have in collection - 2 - 3 ? I have 4.
    Please forgive me my poor language. I cant construct more complicated sentences - but i'am trying.

    -----------
    In PT-2 - heatshield - in "my climat" - not african - is the first "not needed parts"
    but it is not important problem.
    I know story - from Russia - how PT-2 was systematicaly naked - owner left only burner and use two stones as mess stand.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2015
  9. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner SotY Winner Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Messages:
    10,817
    Location:
    Lancashire, United Kingdom
    I see, no my misunderstanding. I thought you disapproved but you mean they're so reliable they don't need to be dismantled. Well, maybe, but that SRV needed to be fixed, for safety's sake.

    Besides, some of us take an interest in seeing the details of construction and assembly.

    Box and instructions, the instructions showing a schematic of parts. References to that date (of manufacture?) of 1988.

    image.jpg

    image.jpg

    image.jpg

    image.jpg

    image.jpg

    John
     
  10. Rangie

    Rangie Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2012
    Messages:
    1,625
    Location:
    Caithness, Far North of Scotland
    Hi John @presscall , one thing strikes me with your Ogonek, where does your control spindle store when its packed up? :-k

    Mine is missing the spindle and spanner, I assumed that the clip was to hold an 8R-esque control key (I use an 8R one..).

    Idle thoughts.... :content:

    Alec.
     
  11. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner SotY Winner Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Messages:
    10,817
    Location:
    Lancashire, United Kingdom
    @Rangie
    It doesn't stow elegantly! The clip in the lid is for the spanner (wrench).

    image.jpeg

    John
     
  12. Bratok_xxl Russian Federation

    Offline
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2011
    Messages:
    191
    Location:
    Russia, Karelia, Petrozavodsk
    Very nice !!!! +1 in Ogonek Team =)
     
  13. threedots New Zealand

    Offline
    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2006
    Messages:
    793
    Thanks John.
    I really enjoy reading your topics. Very informative and with great photos.:thumbup::thumbup:
     
  14. Canuman

    Canuman Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2016
    Messages:
    497
    From what I understand, although my Russian is hardly perfect, one of the labels says "Price: eight rubles." That would have been a fair chunk of change when the exchange between the ruble and dollar was fixed at one to one. When I was in Russia in the 1990s, the exchange rate was 30 rubles to the dollar, and an average family in the provinces might make 2500 rubles a year, so the "Primus Touristika" still wasn't cheap. Now, eight rubles is under ten cents US.

    Russians love camping and the outdoors, and I've hardly ever met one that wasn't a mad fettlemeister. They had to be. Some of the Russian goods were horrible, and others were surprisingly good. It depended if you were on the Monday morning or Friday afternoon part of the supply chain, and your position in line. Russians looked at everything as a sort of raw parts kit that could be made better with polishing or machining, usually lubricated by a few bottles of vodka or "samagon" and a lot of conversation that could wander off into art, poetry, or literature at any moment.

    Fun stuff, and durable gear. They rarely built anything lightweight.
     
  15. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark SotM Winner Subscriber

    Online
    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2004
    Messages:
    18,197
    @presscall ,Good Morning, John,

    Thank you, for your excellent report on this Russian stove!! As you know, I just got one, too, and it was somewhat damaged in shipping. I will work on that later. Too busy right now. I have a question about the dating of these stoves. The top lids on all of these seem to have what, to my uneducated/non-Russian reading eyes, looks like a date. Near the end of the very long number stamped on the lid, it reads "....- 1974/300" I see others have similar numbers, some with the same number as mine, and some with other numbers. But, all of them appear to be dates, to me.

    On the very tattered box of my NT-2, in the bottom right corner of the area where you show a date, mine reads, "20 - 03", whilst yours reads "03 - 88". Does this mean that my stove was manufactured in March of 2000? Still interested in the "date-like" numbers that appear on the lid of these robust stoves. By the way, had my stove NOT been made so robustly, it would have been completely destroyed in shipping, as you have seen!! Thankfully, the double steel heat shield, and the strong fuel tank, kept damage to the windscreen, only!!

    When you have time, please share your thoughts on dating these fun little stoves. I look forward to hearing what you, and hopefully, some of our Russian friends have to say. Thanks, again, and God Bless, as always!

    Every Good Wish,
    Mark
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2016
  16. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner SotY Winner Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Messages:
    10,817
    Location:
    Lancashire, United Kingdom
    @Doc Mark
    Hi Mark

    In his write-up in the Stove Ref Gallery of his Ogonek the stovie formerly known as Iani thanked George @kerophile and George's daughter (who is fluent in Russian) for this translation of the lid text:-

    PT-2 Ogonyok (Small Flame)
    Pricelist 107-09-1974/300
    [Made in] Orgeyev
    Price 8 rubles
    Article MOLD-709
    PRIMUS TOURIST

    In his Stove Ref Gallery write-up on the Ogonek @Bratok_xxl spoke of typically erratic date printing in the instruction manual, though in the case of his it was transposed numbers for his 1981 year of manufacture stove to give it an 1891 vintage! For your year 2000 stove there's no plausible alternative arrangement to the Millenium date, but I'm still perplexed because I'd not expected such a late year of manufacture for the model - but maybe so?

    More input from @Bratok_xxl and the very knowledgeable @gieorgijewski would be appreciated on this dating issue!

    Tough luck on the Ogonek's rough landing. It couldn't have fared worse if it had been sent by Soyuz rocket. I know you've the knowhow and skills to get that windscreen back into shape. Speaking of the Soyuz, the pocket rocket that the Ogonek is won't fail to put a smile on your face when you fire it up.

    Do svidaniya, Mark

    John
     
  17. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark SotM Winner Subscriber

    Online
    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2004
    Messages:
    18,197
    @presscall , Hey, John!

    Many thanks for your comments. I had seen that link but still wondered about the other thing that "looked" like a date, too. I'm posting a photo of the box and date code from my own stove, and I hope that is OK with you.

    NT-2 box March 2000?.jpg

    The "03" had torn off, but as the parts fit together, including the box printing, I'm pretty sure that's how it goes.

    Up against the clock today, so I'll have to check back in a day, or so. Thank you, again, for always being willing to plug in the various puzzle pieces that make up information, and share them here, John!! Talk soon, and thanks, again! God Bless!

    Do svidaniya, to you, too, my Friend!!
     
  18. Bratok_xxl Russian Federation

    Offline
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2011
    Messages:
    191
    Location:
    Russia, Karelia, Petrozavodsk
    I think box is cut-off on date-stamp line. Manufacture date is 20 - 03 -88. Instruction printed and stamped on 02-88.
     
  19. gieorgijewski

    gieorgijewski Subscriber

    Online
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2013
    Messages:
    2,714
    power - 1,9 kW
    tank capacity 0,3 l
    max power - time of burning - 70 min
    medium power -time of burning - 170 min
     
  20. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner SotY Winner Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Messages:
    10,817
    Location:
    Lancashire, United Kingdom