Old camp stove found under shed

Discussion in 'Fettling Forum' started by Clyde Boyd, Oct 30, 2018.

  1. JP2

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  2. Clyde Boyd

    Clyde Boyd United Kingdom Subscriber

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    JP, yes the new burner comes with the jet. Really not sure how much I am going to clean the No.5 yet. Now that I have a nice new burner, i think if I could get a set of nice new legs, maybe I would go for the whole polish, brass was meant to shine after all. If I can't get new legs, then maybe I'll just use my old burner,with the new caps, try and fab a new leg. Really wish I could make contact with "loco7stove", he really does some fantastic work.
     
  3. JP2

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    Hi, you can bring back the old burner like new again if you want. My last buy is an Optimus 210, 1933 coming from PERU and she was black on puctures which was nice and I wanted to keep it that way but when I received it , I have had to go for the big job because everything were smelling very strong even after I wash it. Finally now the stove look like new with some scratches that show her age.
    For the legs, the other day READING through the forum, I have seen a guy that was making new leg with 3, 4 screws on a table. The technique he was using was because he has a old leg as demonstrator so he could position his screws accordingly and then it was a kind of easy. Yesterday I did look for it but I couldn't find out but I am stubborn so I will go back and find it. Hi Hi. I will let you know When I will find out where it is.
    Here pictures of the before and after of the burner that was smelling bag to show you an option you may have to fix your Dad' stove. The inside of the burner is the most important.
    Here we go, BEFORE & AFTER
    20181111_083850~2.png IMG_20181110_170226.jpg

    Have a good day
     
  4. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom Subscriber

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  5. JP2

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    WOW, that is much more than what I was looking for.

    Thank Kerophile
     
  6. Clyde Boyd

    Clyde Boyd United Kingdom Subscriber

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    @JP2 , @kerophile, Man, that is some great information. A great project for my off time. Looks like I am well on my way to my first stove restoration. Thanks guys. I really appreciate all the help. I will keep you posted as I proceed. :D/[-o<
     
  7. Clyde Boyd

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    Hey guys, Well with the help of all you guys on here, @JP2, @Rangie and @kerophile I have made the NRV removal tool, removed the NRV, cleaned the tank with auto motor degreaser using 8 or 9 small ball bearings in the tank to aid in the cleaning process. Fabricated new legs from 3/16" stainless steel round stock using a jig someone pointed me to on here and buffed the old stove. I ordered a washer set from Fettlebox but as of yet I have not received them so for now I have to hold of on trying to light the stove. I didn't get the legs soldered on yet, that will be for my next time off. Thanks everyone for getting me this far.

    NRV tool 1/2" round stock. A little large, but fit the pump opening almost perfectly.

    IMG_0918.JPG


    Jig for bending the legs.
    IMG_0908.JPG


    Bottom of tank after polishing
    IMG_0897.JPG


    Stove after polishing.
    IMG_0910.JPG

    IMG_0916.JPG

    IMG_0914.JPG

    IMG_0917.JPG

    IMG_0915.JPG
     
  8. shagratork

    shagratork United Kingdom Moderator Subscriber

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    @Clyde Boyd

    It is always good to hear such a story as yours followed with a great set of photos.
    It is what makes CCS the number one stove site in the world!
     
  9. kerophile

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    Hi @Clyde Boyd Great work and your stove is looking good.

    I think you may have problems if you try to soft solder stainless steel legs to the brass tank. The stainless steel has a corrosion resistant “passive” film on its surface and the solder will likely not “wet” it.

    You might consider adding tubular brass feet to the tank to make it a collapsible model, where the legs fit into the tubular feet:

    https://classiccampstoves.com/threads/1911-primus-no-100-resurrection.28205/#post-287827


    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
  10. Clyde Boyd

    Clyde Boyd United Kingdom Subscriber

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    @kerophile, Well, I didn't think of that now did I, no biggie, just pick up some 3/16" mild steel stock when I get back home. Didn't take me long to bend the legs. Most of my day was taken up making the jig. Thanks for the insight, that could have gotten a little messy. lol. This is why I post on this forum. There is so much experience and knowledge and everyone is always there to help. Thanks again. I will keep you guys posted.
    C
     
  11. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom Subscriber

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    @Clyde Boyd you came to the right place.

     
  12. JP2

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    Hi
    Well I didn't thing about that neither but by your lack of knowledge and mine, I did learn something for the rest of my like, SO
    Thank you @kerophile
    On the other hand Clyde, with your nice set up the first time, you are probably happy of your results which is quit nice to see. Well done
     
  13. Clyde Boyd

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    @JP2 I must say I was quite pleased with the results. I chose stainless cause I figured I wouldn't have to worry about it tarnishing. It was a lot of fooling around getting that in stainless. There was a $35.00 min materials charge at the metal shop where I purchased it. I could have gotten the mild steel round stock at Princess Auto for a fraction of that price. Again no big deal, always find a use for S.S. lol. I have come this s far now, I'll figure something out. Welder by trade, unfortunately, the only soldering I have done has been copper pipes and a little seam leading on an old car I restored but I do have access to a lot of experience in different trades. Anyway, can't do anything for a while now, back off shore until Feb 4th, then it's around the Bay, have som winter work to do on the cottage.
    Thanks for all the support.
     
  14. Simes

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    Clyde, it may be worthwhile looking at soldering while you're at it. Fluxes have advanced as have solders in the intervening years. If you can make a success of SS it would be something everyone here would love to hear. Mild steel is clearly easier to attach and wet but another solution would be handy if available. It's getting the SD to take the solder in the first place would be the trick.
     
  15. Marc

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    Grind an area off the SS legs and run a bead of mild steel to solder to?

    Beautiful work!
     
  16. Simes

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    Nice thinking @Marc.

    ps SD should read SS...
     
  17. kerophile

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  18. Wim

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    At work we used to solder stainless gauze onto stainless frames and filter housings. Normal 40/60 solder was used, different liquid flux.

    Best regards,

    Wim
     
  19. Clyde Boyd

    Clyde Boyd United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Simes, I think that will happen anyway, i usually listen to others advice, but end up having to find out for myself. I have tig welded brass to mild steel before, but not being sure how thick the walls of the tank is I wouldn't want to try it on this precious piece of history. I have lots of options, I have also considered running a thin layer of over the area to be soldered with a bronze welding rod. This may be easier to tin than the S.S. This is just another challenge that requires a solution. Lots of advise on here and I will try them all until get something that I am comfortable will work before I actually try it on stove.
    C
     
  20. Clyde Boyd

    Clyde Boyd United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Thanks Marc. As I mentioned to Simes, all of these Ideas are great and I'm sure we can get something to work. @kerophile has offered up a couple of good links which i have read. I would like to avoid the replacement of the legs with copper support feet simply because I would like to keep the stove as original as possible.
    C