Optimus 22 Performance

Discussion in 'Stove Forum' started by SimonFoxxx, May 25, 2019.

  1. SimonFoxxx

    SimonFoxxx Subscriber

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    Hiya Stove People,

    I bought an Optimus 22 recently (please see entry under Gallery), and found it to be in good shape. I replaced the NRV pip, and ran it for abot 25 minutes, both burners.

    I notice that a fair amount of soot collects on the interior of the flame rings. Is this normal for a 22 roarer burner, or does it reflect the quality of the kerosene, or is it a burner problem?

    One litre of water boils in 7 mins 30 secs, so the burners seem to be hot enough. I would be grateful for any comments. Thanking you.
    Cheers
    Simon Foxxx
     
  2. Simes

    Simes Subscriber

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    The test would be deposits on the pan base, if they're clean then it would suggest decent combustion.

    Possible culprit may be slightly enlarged jets and the vapour stream being a bit over rich. It's something that I have noticed occasionally but which ones it affects I can't remember, I'll find out one of these days.
     
  3. snwcmpr

    snwcmpr Subscriber

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    Do you get the same results turning the flame down? I wonder if you are supplying too much fuel.
     
  4. Ray123

    Ray123 Subscriber

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    A flame shot would help. Enlarged jets or too much fuel will show flames with yellow tips.

    Maybe it is just a flame ring problem. I have a steel flame ring that soots up where brass rings do not. You mention in your gallery post that your flame rings were chromed by a previous owner. I'm not an expert on the outgassing of chromium metals but feel swapping flame rings would be a good start point.
    If things are still sooty I'd run a few tanks of good quality kero before tearing anything apart. We don't know the life of these stoves before we get them or what fuels were stored in them for extended periods. It's always best to start with the fundamentals; good fuel, clean tank, good pressure with no leaks etc.

    Ray
     
  5. SimonFoxxx

    SimonFoxxx Subscriber

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    Good advice people, the flames look clean, as did the base of the kettle after the boil test..
    I will try running it more and try the best quality kerosene I can find. I am told the best is Jet A1, otherwise known as turbine fuel.
    Cheers
    Simon Foxxx
     
  6. snwcmpr

    snwcmpr Subscriber

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    Jet A1 has additives for preventing ice. @Tony Press says Jet A is not available. He checked everywhere.
     
  7. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

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    In NZ jet A1 will be the best. Diggers blue is pretty good but more expensive.

    Cheers

    Tony
     
  8. Garth

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    Both mine are prone to soot on fllame rings when run at low heat though pan bases arent affected im picking that running cheap kero probably doesnt help ive not tried to improve them as my original has fairly distorted burners probably from dads attempts at melting lead with it my 111/7 isnt the cleanest either but still get s the job done if they get worse ill look at new jets
     
  9. Garth

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    I laugh at folk who complain about the weight of these my father was a keen deerstalker/ hunter and used to carry my red one in his backpack on most trips - manyin my home town borrowed it too its definitely earned its keep over the years
     
  10. Simes

    Simes Subscriber

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    Thanks @Ray123, steel rings are prone to sooting. A handy reminder.
     
  11. SimonFoxxx

    SimonFoxxx Subscriber

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    000_0016.jpg See photos attached to this post. i have an idea it is the chromed flame rings that makes the difference. The fuel burning here is 50/50 kerosene and petrol, Intuitively, you would expect white gasoline to burn cleaner. it seems to make no difference. The flame is clean, i.e. no yellow tips, but you can see the glowing carbon deposits.

    Cheers
    Simon Foxxx 000_0015.jpg View attachment 214831 View attachment 214831
     
  12. threedots New Zealand

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    Hello @SimonFoxxx
    With those type of pot supports, the right hand side does tend to soot more so than the left side.
    The one I had did the same(even with new jets fitted).
    You will notice that the flame pattern hits the pot support more on the right side because the top of the burner directs the flame onto the closest part of the support(only on that side).
    Cheers, John