Optimus 22

Discussion in 'Optimus No:22 (all variants)' started by BernieDawg, Feb 18, 2010.

  1. nzmike

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    That 22 is damn impressive! I had one, fixed it, wasnt so keen on it and sold it. Everybody raved about them, but truth to tell, I like my plain jane 111 way more. Yes I know, 2 111's is a 22 but it just never really did it for me.

    Did I mention that 22 is seriously impressive?
     
  2. toonsgt

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    A carbide lamp, Ron? Nice! Does it work?

    Mike
     
  3. happybrahma

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    Which silent burners are those? Particularly, the left handed one?

    Or are those roarer burners with add-on caps?
     
  4. BernieDawg Banned

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    Take a surplus 111T burner. Disassemble feed tubes and base section. Turn 180 degrees and reassemble.
    Voila - Left-handed silent burner.
    Easy-peasy. :lol:

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  5. happybrahma

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    So simple, although I would have never guessed!

    Given the availability, I'd call it a "donor" burner, not a surplus :)

    By disassemble, do you you mean just pull it apart, or are those soldered?

    If soldered, what kind of solder would be good for re-assembly.
     
  6. BernieDawg Banned

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    Well, you have resurrected a thread over four years old. Surplus burners were available once upon a time on the stove trading markets of the world. So, you can call it what you like, but your doing so speaks to your newness to the subject.
    Those joints are brazed at temperatures far exceeding those used for solder. You can research the subject with reading via Googling "brazing", and/or "silver brazing". Disassembly involves high temperatures and skilled work by a competent technician. Extensive research, learning, lots of practice and skill development are mandatory. Classes at a certified institution are advised. This is not the stuff for newbies or amateurs - sorry.
    No "solder" is involved. Brazing is done with different materials and metal alloys. Soldering is a different process. Again, Google research can be very instructive.
    Good luck!
     
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  7. happybrahma

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    Also, this (plus an extra hole in the case and windshield), sounds great trick for making a left-handed 111t. Add another 111t, and you've got a poor man's silent 22t.


    -Steve
     
  8. snwcmpr

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    Really nice work Gary.
    Ken in NC
     
  9. happybrahma

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    Silver braze then, like a 56% silver braze/solder. Melts around 650c. Yikes! Bronze melts around 900c, which isn't that far away. I also wouldn't want to accidentally un-solder the rest of the burner while while trying to get it apart.

    Definitely would require much practice on brass parts before making any such attempt. Too bad such solder/braze is so expensive. Thanks for the warning.
     
  10. BernieDawg Banned

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    :lol:
    Master fettling wisdom:
    A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.

    If wishes were horses... beggars would ride.

    Collecting rare items is not for the impoverished.

    Life is what you make of it.

    TANSTAAFL
     
  11. snwcmpr

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    Well said, Gary.
    I finally have my oxy-acetylene torch kit assembled. No, not inexpensive. The company gave me a discount for my military service, but still an expense. Time was taken to learn some safety procedures. As it turns out, i had to take the kit back, and they noticed the threads on the acetylene tank I got were faulty. I would not have known that
    My stove hobby (addiction) is not for profit, but for the joy of seeing an item 60 to 100 years old come to life. And I figure some of these need the kind of care and attention masters, like Gary and others too many to name here, have given them.
    I can only hope to continue this care.

    Ken in NC
     
  12. BernieDawg Banned

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    Thanks, Ken, for all your supportive thoughts.

    Faulty threads on an acetylene tank is a scary thing (to me at least). I'm glad you were able to get that taken care of before bad things happened. :thumbup: