Optimus 8

Discussion in 'Optimus No:8 (version prior to the 8R)' started by BernieDawg, Oct 5, 2012.

  1. BernieDawg Banned

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    I enjoyed seeing the post by whitegas of his very early Optimus 8.

    Internal Link

    Somehow, it seemed familiar. :-k Why sure enough, there is one of those right here in ye olde dawg house. :D

    Pictures are below. But, first, a note. These things are really not something you want to add to your collection. No matter what anyone says about them, it's best just to pass them by and let other people buy them. These are not the stoves you are looking for. Move along, move along. :whistle: (Is the Jedi mind trick working?)

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    These early Optimus 8's do not have a wick. The fuel supply pipe is set at the bottom of the tank and allows for complete draining of the tank under pressure. The pipe/tank joint looks to be more fragile than the later designs and probably more difficult to assemble correctly. (It would be harder for *me* to build, anyway.) I would theorize that production costs and robustness contributed to the change to a higher connection requiring the wick in later models. The spirit pan is oddly tiny. It will get the stove up and running. Double-priming speeds things up, however.

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    The different design safety release valve cap.

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    No notch in the heat shield because of the low fuel feed position.

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    Burning.

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    The ledge in the burner bell supports the silent cap. Here a BD, but will also work with a #4200.

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    Cheers,
    Gary
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 1, 2015
  2. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark Subscriber

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    Dang Dawg!!

    When I clicked on this post, I REALLY wanted to add an earlier Optimus 8 than I already have, to my collection!! Now, for some strange reason, I seem no longer to have a yearning for one of these, and in fact, feel quite strongly that I must complete this post, and "move along, move along"!!!! :shock: :shock: :content: :content: :-s :-k :-s :-k :D :D

    Lovely stove, Gary, and one of these days, if I ever "feel like it" again, then I'll get one, too!! I like the bottom feed fuel line, and the rather abrupt edges on the case, compared to a regular 8R. Thanks, a bunch, for the great report and photos, Mate!! Well done! :clap: :clap: :D Take care, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc (who must now go and pack all of his stoves and send them to you...... for some odd.... unexplained...... reason........ I MUST MOVE ALONG!) ;) ;) :lol: :lol:
     
  3. hikerduane

    hikerduane Subscriber

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    Gary, I notice on mine that is not quite as old as yours, the hinges seem a whole lot heavier duty. Nice stove.
    Duane
     
  4. Big BTU

    Big BTU Subscriber

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    Nice Optimus 8 Gary! :mrgreen: You know you have too many stoves when you can't quite recall if you have one or not... :lol:
     
  5. islandpiper

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    I like this feature the best. This stove seems to have a well dressed coffee stirring hand built in to the end of the fuel tank. I wonder if it might also be pressed into duty as a fueling assistant or match holder? piper
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    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2015
  6. Chef BC

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    Good day to you Gary!
    Wonder if there is a way; aside from substituting the tank cap, to expedite pressurizing with a midi pump? :-k 8-[
    Chef
     
  7. SMolson

    SMolson Subscriber

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    I 2nd what Chef suggested. I've used my Opti midi-pump and associated fuel cap to prime my Opti 8s and it works fine with a single prime. I don't bother using the pump afterwards once she's running though, too unbalanced, risky and cumbersome.

    One of my early Opti 8 is no wick and what appears to be a soldered tube, not screwed/bolted in for easy access/replacement.

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    Love those nickel-plated fuel tanks/stoves.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2015
  8. DAVE GIBSON

    DAVE GIBSON Subscriber

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    When I see fine stoves like that I ask myself why would they bother to change anything? Why not just keep making those?
     
  9. geeves

    geeves New Zealand Subscriber

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    Although it isn't really the wicks job it does restrict fuel flow. Imagine what would happen to this stove if the jet started to leak mid use. Until you got to the regulator it would be emptying its fuel as fast as tank pressure allows. The word conflagration comes to mind.
     
  10. BernieDawg Banned

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    I don't have a problem at all with double priming. I would never sully this fine old stove with a pressure cap. Its fine just the way it is. If I wanted a pump and pressure cap I'd use an 8R with a pressure cap - a more proper combo. If I wanted to prime this perfectly lovely old 8 faster, I'd put it inside my jacket or shirt for a bit so it could warm the fuel and build some pressure.

    What's the big hurry anyway? I think you fellers are really missing the point of this stuff. When on the trail or the river I reckon I'm out there to relax, not be in a big hurry. :lol:

    Geeves... I have no idea what you are talking about. A wick only acts to conduct fuel to the burner from a part of the tank that would not conduct fuel. No wick is needed in this stove. It most certainly does not restrict fuel flow! :doh: Wicks do not act as "flame arresters" or safety devices in any way. That erroneous notion has already been dispensed with in a marvelous post by Presscall elsewhere on this forum. Wicks for safety is a myth perpetrated by those who are afraid of petrol as fuel. Those individuals should stick to kerosene and stop spreading fear based on faulty physics and over active imaginations. [-X

    A big happy stovie shout out to those who had something positive and complimentary to say! That's the good ol' CCS spirit! :thumbup: :D/
     
  11. Chef BC

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    Gary, you are right; forgive my impetuousness, :oops: even I get caught up in the "git it dunn" "bundle" for immediate satisfaction. Trouble is I came on this scene too late and have never owned a superb stove like this, am still learning though. All of you stovies that have beautiful stoves like Gary's, might want to sleep with them under your pillow at night! 8-[ Meanwhile, the next 8R I come across, will use it to drive fence posts or use as a skipping stone. :^o I will just quietly move along now. :doh: :-$ :-$
    Chef
     
  12. BernieDawg Banned

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    :lol: :lol:

    Aw, Chef. I guess maybe that's a wee bit of sarcasm? ;) Well played! :clap: Yeah, I guess maybe I came across as a bit "high'n'mighty" on that, huh? Sorry. :oops:

    The thing is, from my perspective, I get a fair amount of email from folks searching for missing parts off their treasured stove. Most stoves on eBay are missing parts. Most of the really collectible stoves have parts that cannot likely be found again. And, all because a former owner swapped, or lost, or played around with the original.

    I'm just saying that these unique and rare ones ought (in my opinion) to be kept together in one original piece. I might have the intention to put the original rare and unique fuel cap back on this stove after a swap for a pressure cap. But, if I drown on my next river adventure or get hit by a bus just down the street, my spouse would be stuck disposing of my collection and have no clue the cap was incorrect. Thus, another bodged stove shows up in the marketplace never to be reunited with it's proper gear. It's my feeling a collector has a responsibility to properly care for their charges. I'll die before the stove does and it will be someone else's stove someday. It's why I post the photos here at CCS, the Wikipedia of stovedom - recording the correct stove before something bad happens to it.

    And, for what it's worth, the stove in question was purchased just within the last 18 months, not long ago in some mythical "time-of-plentiful-and-cheap-stoves". They are out there for those who search diligently and are willing to pay what they are worth. It's not a matter of showing up late to the party, I think. It's more a matter of being willing to pay the door charge. ;)

    With regard to double-priming... an alternative to double-priming was taught to me by a stove pal who I consider to be the greatest living expert on small self-pressurizing stoves. Use an accessory spirit pan! Here's a photo of the pan that this kind gent sent me, complete with mythical dolphin-fish engraving, on my aluminum Optimus 8:
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    Should the stove be sold on without my involvement, everything is still original and correct but with the addition of a curious pan for the next owner to figure out. I can always swap the pan to the 8 I started the thread with should I desire. Tin can lids can serve the same, though less classy, function

    As to the pressure cap and pump use... I like them a lot, but restrict them to the ubiquitous 8R's. These 8R's are still as common as flies, so I reckon no big deal what one does to those little rascals. At least for the time being. It's good to have a few spare pump sets around to fit on 8R's or refit on 199's as one encounters them.
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    The pump set drawer.

    I hope we're clearer on everything now and you aren't still annoyed with me. :thumbup: :content:

    Cheers,
    Gary
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2015
  13. SMolson

    SMolson Subscriber

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    Gary - I use the midipump/supporting fuel cap on these old Opti 8's and other similarly dainty (e.g. small volume) Primus/Optimus priming cup/welled stoves: 99, 71, 80, etc when in the field.
    It helps cut back on the amount of meth/spirit required on trips to help get them going, especially in cold, below 0 weather. When at home under more 'controlled' conditions it's a different story. I don't bother 'jacketing' them for warmth - in my experience it's not that efficient once removed and exposed to the environment. I agree though, I don't like the look of the pump or the off-colored cap on such cute nickel-plated stoves. But I'm not too concerned with looks, primarily it's efficiency and fuel (spirit) saving functionality when out there with a limited supply to begin with.
     
  14. SMolson

    SMolson Subscriber

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    Sorry - it's not the Primus 71 but the Radius 42 I had also used it with. THe 71 is not compatible with the midipump/pump cap.
     
  15. Rick b

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    Great post and BD, a very nice 8 you have have gotten. Very clever idea using the accessory spirit pan. Thanks.
     
  16. BernieDawg Banned

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    Rick B, Thanks! And, +4 BernieDawg Happy Points to you for a lovely reply. :content:

    SMolson.... I think you rather missed my point concerning use of the rare ones, but whatever. Further, I felt you might have had a point about the low temperature stove operation until I realized your 0 temp is my 32 deg F temp. That doesn't seem that cold to me. Maybe you are doing something wrong. :-k

    And... concerning your statements above on the Primus 71, it has been pointed out to me via mail from a quite knowledgeable stove aficionado:



    I did the waltz myself in the SRG and concur with the knowledgeable collector's well-researched data. There are plenty of later 71's in the SRG that clearly show the larger fuel cap. There is so much good information right here at CCS that so few seem to take the effort of researching. So, -10 BernieDawg Happy Points to you for failing to do the research about the 71 history in the SRG and posting your opinions as "facts" here in this thread. [-X :? :lol:

    Now that the "stove Wikipedia" is set right (in this thread only, mind you)...

    Cheers :D/ ,
    Gary