Optimus Hiker +

Discussion in 'Stove Forum' started by kerry460, Jan 1, 2017.

  1. kerry460

    kerry460 Australia R.I.P. Subscriber

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    G,,day .
    i have got the rusty tank hiker + going , i am still hoping to get a brass tank as i wonder how long before rust forms again .
    i cleaned the tank with nuts and shellite . the used a derusting liquid .

    after tightening the loose NRV as has been discussed .
    it is burning great until the rust comes back .

    the soot on the big pot is not from this burn .
    i let it burn for over an hour with the big pot on it, no overheating problems .
    cheers
    kerry 100_2377.JPG 100_2377.JPG P1000020.JPG P1000040.JPG P1000041.JPG
     
  2. hikerduane

    hikerduane Subscriber

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    Pretty amazing run. Can you rinse the tank with kero or a light oil between uses?
    Duane
     
  3. kerry460

    kerry460 Australia R.I.P. Subscriber

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    the last 1 hour burn was jet a , but that is an option ,
    not prefered , a brass tank is the best .
    then it will basically be a modern 111 .
    which i love .

    kerry
     
  4. cmb56

    cmb56 Sweden Subscriber

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    @kerry460
    Kerry,
    Have you concider to use a cathodic zinc treatment of the inside of the tank?
    I am not sure if the zinc will handle kerosene, but I guess so.
    After you have removed the rust inside and dryed the tank you fill some of this zinc inside and splash around so the whole inside will be covered and then you pour out the rest and let dry.
    The oxygene will have it difficult to oxidize the iron.

    This cathodic zinc will be found in spray bottles.

    This metode is very useful to preserve old metal spirit bottles that always rust from the inside when spirit is left in the bottle.
    For those who do not know, spirit take up water over time so the bottles rust.

    Michael
     
  5. ArchMc

    ArchMc SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Detach all the brass fittings, clean tank, rinse inside with phosphoric acid, reassemble. No more rust and a protective coating. What derusting liquid did you use?

    I like 111s better too, but you have a Hiker+ and no replacement tank. It's burning really well.

    ....Arch

    edit: somehow I didn't post this earlier. I haven't heard of the cathodic zinc treatment mentioned by @cmb56. That might also be a possibility.
     
  6. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

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  7. Normo

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    Well done Kerry!!

    Norm
     
  8. kerry460

    kerry460 Australia R.I.P. Subscriber

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    the zinc is an idea , i will wait to see if i get a brass tank .
    Arch . it is late and i cant remember .
    Tony and Norm , thanks .

    kerry
     
  9. kerry460

    kerry460 Australia R.I.P. Subscriber

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    @ArchMc the rust converter is a phosphoric acid type

    kerry
     
  10. ArchMc

    ArchMc SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Fantastic! So any part of the tank that was rusted is now covered by a layer of iron phosphate, especially since you removed the loose flakes by shaking a bunch of nuts and Shellite around inside first. Unless this tank was already nearly rusted through, I'm betting it will last a good long time if taken care of. Even if you want to replace it with a brass tank, it would probably be worth rinsing with CF, closing off the openings, and saving it as a spare.

    ....Arch
     
  11. kerry460

    kerry460 Australia R.I.P. Subscriber

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    Arch , i agree .
    i still have the option of coating the inside with an epoxy .
    i am waiting to see about the brass tank .
    kerry
     
  12. ArchMc

    ArchMc SotM Winner Subscriber

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    One thing: Is the pump housing (inside the tank) brass? I don't know what phosphoric acid does to brass, but I imagine that it's not good. If you treated the tank with the brass pump housing inside, rinsing it out well with fuel is probably the only thing you can do. Maybe @kerophile knows the longer term effects of phosphoric acid on brass.

    ....Arch
     
  13. kerry460

    kerry460 Australia R.I.P. Subscriber

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    interesting thought , i had not thought of that .
    @kerophile can you please add some information to this
    the pump tube , filler tube and fuel delivery pipe are all brass .

    cheers

    kerry
     
  14. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Nothing is simple, but here are a few observations:

    1. Phosphoric acid at quite high concentrations can be used to remove rust and provide a rust-resisting phosphate 'conversion coating' on steel surfaces.

    2. Soft drinks like Coca Cola contain a weak solution of Phosphoric acid and will remove tarnish from brass coins or small items if immersed in the liquid overnight. Higher concentrations of Phosphoric acid will remove brass tarnish very rapidly and will then dissove the underlying metal.

    3. In the metal object is under stress (including internal stresses) the attack can be far more severe and selective. In a worse case scenario stress-corroaion cracking can occur and the metal fall apart.

    4. If you have two or more metals connected together and immersed in an acid solution you will get galvanic corrosion, where one metal/alloy in the couple is preferentially dissolved in the solution.

    From the above you can see that there is no definitive answer to your implied question. However, here are some pointers:

    If you want to treat the steel tank with phosphoric acid or proprietary mixes, dismantle it first, so the you do not have dis-similar metal couples.

    Follow the instructions.

    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
  15. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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  16. kerry460

    kerry460 Australia R.I.P. Subscriber

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    thanks for the info.
    i have already treated the tank , and removal of the brass bits would not be practical .
    so i will just have to hope .

    kerry