Optimus No. 0 mid-late 1920s

Discussion in 'Optimus No:0' started by kerophile, Dec 10, 2006.

  1. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Hi, I thought I would share some photos of a stove I have been working on today.

    This is a rather rare stove I think; an Optimus No. 0 from the mid to late 1920s.

    The Optimus No. 0 is a 1.5 pint paraffin stove with fixed legs, which shares the same burner as an Optimus 00, 1 pint stove.

    1355060289-DSCN0039_edited-2.jpg

    1355060299-DSCN0040_edited-2.jpg

    The spirit cup has a dimple, again as shown for the 1929 stove. By 1939 it had been replaced with the more familiar "modern" version.

    1355060306-DSCN0041_edited-1.jpg

    The engraving on this stove is still sharp and clear despite its 70 plus years age.

    1355060314-DSCN0042.jpg 1355060325-DSCN0044-3.jpg 1355060332-DSCN0045.jpg

    The filler cap is an early type and is shown in the 1929 catalogue/ spare parts listing.

    1355060340-DSCN0048_edited-1.jpg
    The pump size of the Optimus 0 is the same as on the smaller 00 stove.

    Has anyone else seen one of these stoves?

    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
  2. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark Subscriber

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    Hello, George,

    As always, your stove fettling skills, and the wonderful photographs of your work, are simply stunning!!! My hat is off to you, Sir, for sharing what is very clearly a love of what you do with your stoves!!! =D> =D> =D> =D> TOP notch stove, Kerophile!! Thanks, very much, for sharing it with us! Take care, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc Mark
     
  3. DAVE GIBSON

    DAVE GIBSON Subscriber

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    WONDERFUL
    that really shows the deference between collectors and enthusiasts...
    researched and brought back to showroom quality..top notch photos--was that
    a seamless background sheet you used???..i noticed the pot stands were still
    somewhat tarnished..will you at some point polish those???
     
  4. barrabruce

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    =P~ One of these days I'm gunna find me some polish and a little lacquer.

    Whats the dimple supsed to do in the priming ring if anything????

    Another lesson lernt.
     
  5. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    G'day Bruce. I think the dimple in the spirit cup is there so that when essentially all the spirit is burnt away in the rest of the "doughnut", there is still spirit, and a localised flame at the dimple.
    This flame can be directed upwards, using a shroud tube, to ignite the burner at the higher level, once pressure is applied to the tank, and paraffin vapour starts coming out the jet. This was called the Auto-igniter I believe.

    See the items in this attached link to the 1929 Optimus catalogue:

    http://

    This means that you don't need to have a match handy, and in the case of a silent burner you are much less likely to get the dreaded "underburn", where vapour ignites at the jet rather than at the apertures of the outer burner cup

    Later, Primus developed their own tubular "Igniter", which has an asbestos wick within its expanded base, and does not therefore need the dimple in the spirit cup.

    Thats's what I believe anyway.

    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 1, 2015
  6. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Hi Doc and Dave. Thanks for the kind comments, they are much appreciated.
    I used a folding " soft light studio" on the dining room table to take the images. The sort of thing shown in the attached link, although I do not have the lighting set-up they show:

    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Photo-Studio-...34QQihZ011QQcategoryZ3860QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

    Because the brass is highly polished I used the "Museum" setting on the camera and the exposures were very long... a quarter or one half second. This helps to eliminate glare and give a deeper colour to the brass. Unfortunately it makes the legs look like shit! They look a lot better with the naked eye.

    The legs on this stove had rust on them when I received it but there was little metal loss. I removed the loose rust and treated the steel with Phosphoric acid solution to neutralise the rust by turning it into a phospate-containing layer. This looks dark, and a bit patchy but I will do no more at this stage. I could take the legs back to bare shiny metal but I would then need to protect them in some way to prevent later rust formation.

    Originally the legs would have been tinned with solder to allow them to be easily attached to the tank and give them a degree of corrosion protection. They have lost this layer during their 70+ years life and for me to re-tin them would require me to remove them from the stove, tin them, and then re-solder them back onto the tank. I would not feel confident in doing this.

    My friend "Exeter Yak" has dome some development work on tinning stove legs but the proximity of legs to the bottom seam of the tank means that you have to be very careful when soldering in this area. if you want a non-leaking tank.

    I think I will stop at this stage of restoration, which is conservative, and if techniques develop in future, leg improvement will still be a possibility.

    Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 1, 2015
  7. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark Subscriber

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    Good Morning, Kerophile,

    Thanks, very much, for your photo/lighting tips! Interestingly enough, I am headed down the mountain tomorrow, before I pick up Sweet Bride at the airport, to buy just such a setup as yours! We need it for photographing her jewelry work, and of course, I just "might" use it for my stoves, watches, guns, and who knows what else!!! ;) 8) :lol: May I ask your advice on the tent size, George? The standard size table top tents that I've seen are 20" squares. But, I've been giving thought to getting the next biggest one, which is 28" square. Any thoughts about that? The setup that offers that size tent, also comes with three lights, on stands, and two backgrounds, white and black. I know you can buy other color backgrounds and will probably do so. I was thinking the larger tent size might offer us the chance to use it for other than small things. Or, do you think that a 20" tent will be big enough? Many thanks for your suggestions. And, by the way, any and all praise sent your way has been earned through your hard work, skill, and sharing!!! Thanks, always, for that Kerophile!! Take care, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc Mark
     
  8. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Hi Doc, I should say first of all that I am not a photograpy expert, and am only using the camera as a tool for capturing the images.

    The portable "studio" I use only cost me US$ 45 from a UK Supplier called Maplin, when I bought it about 18 months ago. Here is the link:

    http://www.kingbest.com.tw/

    The product code is WSB 501. The "studio" is a small, cubic, tent-like structure of only 16 inches side, with the back wall and base providing the coloured, seamless, back-drop.

    The two sides and the roof of the cube are are made from a white, light- diffusing, translucent, fabric. The front is of course open to allow for photograghy.

    For storage the whole assembly folds flat into a self contained black folio- type case about three-quarter inch thick. This case has a couple of straps to allow a small camera tripod to be attached for carrying.

    I have found this arrangement adequate for my purpose and certainly suitable for stoves up to 2 pint tank capacity. For bigger stoves I wait for the Spring-time and photograph them out-doors.

    I have never used more than Natural light, the room lights, or built-in camera flash. However I am sure that dedicated lighting would give many more options. I have one double -sided back-cloth offering blue or silver. It would be nice to have a wider choice as it is amazing what a difference the back-drop colour can make to the appearance of an item.

    Good Luck with you purchase. I am sure you will have lots of fun experimenting with the set-up.

    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
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  9. Sketch R.I.P.

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    Doc,

    I own a light tent also. The bigger the better. You can always photograph small things in a large tent, but you cannot photograph large things in a small tent.

    I did not buy a dedicated lighting setup with my tent. I use several methods of lighting including a bounce flash inside of the tent. Extra lighting directed from the outside of the tent can elicit the sort of look you are after. If the extra lighting setup isn't too expensive, go for it. Often, a manufacturer has put a great deal of thought into lighting. Jewelry, as you know, can be a difficult thing to photograph. A light tent will help in a big way. Good luck and be sure to show us some of your photos once you've taken some and become acquainted with your new photo tool!
     
  10. igh371

    igh371 SotM Winner Subscriber

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    @kerophile Hi George, I'm going to suggest pushing the production date of this marvelous stove of yours back to 1930/1 at the very very latest. The reason for this is information I've discovered in some more recently available catalogues while trawling through them trying to work out how put a rough date onto a slightly later example of an Optimus '0' (which I will now add to the gallery). I have found that the 1929 catalogue is the last to show the sail-type filler cap being used for the '0'. The illustration of the whole stove wasn't updated to show the new plainer filler cap until 1934, but the parts lists in the 1932 and 1933 catalogues make it clear that the change of filler cap design had already taken place by then. :thumbup:
    Best wishes,
    Ian.
     
  11. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Hi Ian @igh371 thanks for the information and knowledge. I just realised that the original post dates back to 2006. We certainly have many more catalogues available on CCS since then. Perhaps I should revise the title date to mid to late 1920s?

    What date would you put on this example?

    https://classiccampstoves.com/threads/optimus-no-0-c1939.23862/

    Best Regards,
    George.
     
  12. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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  13. igh371

    igh371 SotM Winner Subscriber

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    @kerophile, "thanks for the information and knowledge" - I can't claim any great knowledge here, just applying and passing on newly available information. However, on the basis of what can now be seen in those more recently available catalogues from the early 1930s there doesn't appear to be any reason to question the dating of that "c.1939" Optimus '0' gallery example. On the other hand, for the same reasons discussed above, the production date of the "1920-30s" No.4 can probably be narrowed down more closely to simply '1920s'. In fact pinning down the dating of the change from the 'sail'-type filler cap to the plainer form to between 1930-2 can probably be applied fruitfully to assisting the dating of many other Optimus stoves. But catalogues and parts lists from 1930 and 1931 may yet surface which will make it possible to date the year of the change even more precisely, we can but hope:thumbup:
    Ian.