Optimus ranger 10 - how to use safe?

Discussion in 'Stove Forum' started by OptimusprimeNorway, Jan 22, 2021.

  1. OptimusprimeNorway Norway

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    I have a pair of Optimus ranger 10. I have only tested one once because I was scared. I filled the tank with lighter fluid because this fluid is about the same as the kerosene sold at a higher price. At least that is what I have been told here in Norway. When I preheated the stove, I heard it start to boil inside the tank. I have never experienced this with other stoves I have used this on.

    I waited until the preheater had almost turned off and turned on the burner. I thought maybe the pressure would be going down. Eventually, lighter fluid began to spray from the safety valve on the fuel cap. It also boiled more inside the tank. I closed the burner again and left the stove until it had cooled down. It was incredibly scary. What can I do to avoid this? Ranger 10 does not have a heat shield such as 8R. Can it help to put on such a shield? Maybe I need to use biodiesel instead of lighter fluid? or the kerosene?

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    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 22, 2021
  2. Rangie

    Rangie Subscriber

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    This stove gets very hot in use. I would never advocate the use of white gas in it.
    Stick to Kerosene, my R10 loves it!

    Alec.
     
  3. Fettler United States

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    "Lighter Fluid" is Naphtha, practically identical to Coleman Fuel, and is Not Kerosene.
     
  4. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    Exactly. Here in the US lighter fluid is basically Coleman. Smells the same, too. Don't know Norway, but I very much doubt lighters there are fueled with kerosene.
     
  5. OptimusprimeNorway Norway

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    Here is content from data sheets on Norwegian blåtind kerosene:
    Hydrocarbons, C11-C14, n-alkanes, isoalkanes, cyclic, <2% aromatics 100%

    Here is the content of Coop lighter fluid that I often use:
    Hydrocarbons, C10-C13, n-alkanes, isoalkanes, cyclic, <2% aromatics.

    I'm not a chemist, but it looks pretty much the same to me. I do not know what they mean by Hydrocarbons marked with C followed by numbers, but the kerosene goes from C11-C14, and the lighter fluid I use goes from C-10 to C-13. Otherwise it looks exactly the same
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2021
  6. z1ulike

    z1ulike United States SotM Winner Subscriber

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    It depends on what type of lighter fluid you're using. The kind you start charcoal with is essentially the same as kerosene. The kind that you put in your Zippo cigarette lighter is essentially the same as gasoline or Coleman fuel.

    If you can't figure out the problem with your Ranger 10s. I'll be glad to take those defective stoves off your hands. With me, the giving never stops. :D/

    Ben
     
  7. OptimusprimeNorway Norway

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    It is lighter fluid for charcoal yes.

    :lol:
     
  8. Fettler United States

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    Ah, yes. A key difference in language terminology! "Lighter Fluid" in Anglo-American always means Zippo or Ronsonal fluid, for cigarette lighters.

    "Charcoal Lighter fluid" would mean something copletely different, for outdoor grills. It would be something very close to Kerosene, if not identical.
     
  9. OptimusprimeNorway Norway

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    Got it now. :) We say lighter gas, not lighter fluid about what we fill the zippo with, etc.
     
  10. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    I don't have one of those stoves, but I've perceived boiling fuel before. It does get hot.
     
  11. hikerduane

    hikerduane Subscriber

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    Maybe leave on the shelf. They will get pretty hot, fuel boils, may need a rag or glove to loosen the fuel cap when shutting down to release pressure.
    Duane
     
  12. OptimusprimeNorway Norway

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    I have not tested, but the tank and box look the same as the 8R. If it is the same tank and box as on the 8R stove, it should not be impossible to use a shield from an 8R to test. The reason it gets so hot is probably because there is no heat shield on it. Since the Ranger 10 is made to be able to use diesel, a heat shield probably does not work so well.
     
  13. Spiritburner

    Spiritburner Admin SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Heat shield could be a good idea. When I had one I tried my best to make it blow the valve as I'd read how 'dangerous' these were. I could only get it to blow if I used a really big pan that totally overhung the tank. Even then it was only a candle flame.
     
  14. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark SotM Winner Subscriber

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    @OptimusprimeNorway ,

    NO worries about the boiling fuel, as long as it's kerosene!! Mine does that, too, and it's "normal" for this little stove. I would never use diesel unless it was a real emergency! Tried it when doing some testing, and it was, pretty much, a smoky, smelly mess! Made the food taste "tainted", too. Kerosene is readily available, and not that expensive.

    As for a heat shield, I do not think one would fit in the case. If you think about how the proper windscreen for the #10 fits the burner, you'll easily see that a heat shield for the stove won't work.

    DSCN1787.jpg

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    And, as noted above, it's certainly not needed for this little powerhouse!! You'll get used to the boiling fuel, and pretty soon, won't even notice it! Have fun with it, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc
     
  15. OptimusprimeNorway Norway

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    Thanks for the great advice. Now I gained a little more confidence so that I will dare to try it again. One thing that is also important is maintenance. Many people are not so good at maintaining the safety valve in the tank cap, so I will take a check. I have bought parts for this if needed. I do not think there is anything wrong with it since it triggered as it should with too high pressure. I will try with regular kerosene next time. It has about 10 degrees Celsius (50 ° F) higher flash point compared to charcoal lighter fluid . Maybe it helps a little. Do I really need to use the small pump? Since it gets so hot fast inside maybe it's better not to use it and let the pressure build up itself? On my Svea 123R there is no pump.
     
  16. hikerduane

    hikerduane Subscriber

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    I've not tried w/o pumping, may have a weak flame to start, but you are trying to push a heavier fuel than petrol thru a smaller jet. Recommendations are to pump it up per instructions.
    Duane
     
  17. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark SotM Winner Subscriber

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    @OptimusprimeNorway ,

    You are most welcome, Sir! Glad I could offer some meager help. As to pumping, yes, I agree with @hikerduane. Follow the proper directions, for best performance with your little stove. Don't over-pump, just follow the directions, and it should run a treat, and not overheat! Works for me, anyway. If I recall, Optimus had problems with that stove, NOT because the stove was poorly designed, but because far too many people were not reading and following the directions, and used improper fuels in them. Hence, their hyperbolic reputation for blowing the SRV! Used properly, you should have no problems, whatsoever. Great little stove!! Good luck, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc
     
  18. Blueflame111

    Blueflame111 United States Subscriber

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    I agree with @Doc Mark. The boiling sound inside is completely normal. I just had both of my 111T stoves running in the last few days, both are running on kerosene. When the stove is finished preheating you start to hear a dripping sound inside the tank. I believe this might be is what you are referencing when you say boiling. Completely normal and means you are read to light it up most of the time in my experience.
     
  19. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    Now and then lately, looking back in the old CCS1 archive just posted lately by Ross, I recently saw an old thread about boiling kerosene in small stoves.

    Well-known phenomenon. In small stoves, kero readily gets very hot, even boiling, and sustains self-pressurization to a considerable degree. Not a problem.
     
  20. z1ulike

    z1ulike United States SotM Winner Subscriber

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    I don't think you're hearing boiling kerosene. Kerosene boils between about 150 and 300 °C (300–575 °F) which is quite hot. Even if it did get that hot the kerosene wouldn't boil because it's confined in the tank. Liquid in a closed system won't boil because the pressure inside the tank equals the vapor pressure of the heated liquid. That's how pressure cookers work.

    Ben