Overheating Phoebus 725

Discussion in 'Stove Forum' started by bark2much, Aug 16, 2008.

  1. bark2much

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    I am wondering, if my 725 is overheating, or it is normal for a 725 to run this hot.

    When the priming is done, I open the valve, and the stove is already nearing the full speed.
    1218858800-012.JPG

    First, the 725 jumps to the max speed too quickly, compared to my other Pheonix copies.
    Phoenixes reach the max speed in good time.
    1219077299-015_fixed.jpg

    Secondly, The fuel tank gets really hot, so when the stove is shut off, and reopned about 30 seconds later, this is what I get:
    1218859074-023.JPG

    It eventually settles down a bit, but it runs pretty hot and the flame is unusually tall. If you look at the bottom of the picture, you can see the gas leaking a little and caught fire under the burner. It will need to be tightened a bit.

    Here is the afterglow:
    1218859206-032.JPG

    If you have experienced the similar trait of overheating in Phoebus 725, please let me know. As it stands, I have to limit its use to a cold climate.
     

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    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2015
  2. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark Subscriber

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    Hey, B2M,

    I've had more than a few Phoebus 725's, and to a stove, they tend to run very hot, indeed! In fact, they only seem to have one speed: Nuclear Smelter!!! :shock: :shock: ;) :lol: :lol: I actually like those stoves, quite a bit, but not for regular cooking duties. I have tended to use mine for melting snow, and for boiling water, lots and lots of water! For those duties, the 725 really shines! And, yes, the steel tank gets VERY hot, indeed!! Sounds like your's is just being a regular old 725, to me. Take care, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc
     
  3. bajabum

    bajabum R.I.P.

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    Damn, now i need a smoke... :lol: :lol: :lol:
     
  4. the priest

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    Wow!!!!! :shock: :shock: :shock:

    Talk about a perfect cold weather stove!!!!
     
  5. bark2much

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    Well, I'll tell you what: it was a very hot and steamy session! To boil a kettle full of water, that is!

    Thanks, Doc, now I can rest easy.

    Edit: I intended for the second picture to be different from the first, but for some reason the identical pictures were uploaded, and now I cannot edit into the initial post. I'll just let it be.
     
  6. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark Subscriber

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    :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: Hey, I could be wrong, but that's been my experience, and all told, I've probably owned a dozen Phoebus 725's, over the years, and all of them have been exactly like yours. I've given many of them away, or traded them, and am down to a measly 3 or 4 of them, now. It's poor I am, that's for sure!!! ;) ;) :lol: :lol: Take care, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc

    P.S. One thought on priming the 725, and also the 625, for that matter: I have found that they prime better, and more reliably, with METHS, and not Coleman fuel. Since it works so well for me, that's all I use for priming both stoves, now, and have for years. Have fun with your's and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2015
  7. bark2much

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    Edit: the correct picture is posted now.
     
  8. Mikespike

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    Hi guys,
    I also have made the experience that the 725s get very hot. So far mine have not had problems from that, steel tank and viton gaskets.

    What was discussed recently in the german Pelam forum is that the silent burner cap can fit onto the 725 making it a silent burner. Nice idea. I tried it out and found that the flame is easier to regulate. The stove still gets equally hot though.

    I attach a picture of this 725 with 625 burner cap

    Kind regards
    Michael

    1219355741-Phoebus_725_Leisebrenner.jpg
     

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    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2015
  9. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark Subscriber

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    Hello, Michael,

    Hey, that's a neat idea, swapping the silent cap from a 625, to a 725!! I might have to give that a try, just for fun! Thanks, very much, for the idea, and also the neat photo, too! Welcome to CCS, too! Take care, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc
     
  10. Andrew61

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    Hi, I am just new to this forum it is very interesting. I have the Phoebus 725 knock off (or should that be clone) the Sun Power Camping Stove C-747. It gets very hot to, it seems virtually identical to the 725 but the filler cap is slightly different although mine could be missing the screw thing on top, anyway why I raise this is there is often a small yellow flame emanating from the hole at the top of the cap I have wondered if this is dangerous or just doing what it was designed to do by safely venting excess pressure.
    Andrew.
     
  11. bark2much

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    If the fuel cap is letting out tiny bit of gas vapor, then it is time that you check for the hardness of the seal. The rubber may have hardened, and it is not able to maintain the perfect seal.
     
  12. bark2much

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    Hi, Gary,
    The plate on the fuel tank does not really touch, except on the raised part on the edge. The major portion of the heat is transfered through the burner stem and mesh stuff inside.

    I find that Original Phoebus gets hotter than the knockoff. As a matter of fact, I seem to like the knockoff better!
     
  13. Andrew61

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    The fuel is leaking from the hole at the top of the cap and not from around the side. The next time I fire it up I'll photograph it.
    Andrew.
     
  14. Bom Bom Bom Bom

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    Hi Andrew, As well at the seal around the bottom of the cap, there is also a safety pressure valve within the cap. This valve will contain a seal. This is the seal B2M will be referring to.